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Would like some input on dielectric grease use on electrical connections.

On snap together electrical connections; I was planning to use QD electronics cleaner. I've read where many people also use dielectric grease. Any experience if this is good practice.

I use dielectric grease on battery connections but I smear it on the outside after I have connected everthing together. I also use it on spark plug boots to seal out moisture.

Any input is appreciated.

Thank you!

Mike
 

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MMcGuire said:
....On snap together electrical connections; I was planning to use QD electronics cleaner. I've read where many people also use dielectric grease. Any experience if this is good practice......
Yes to both.

Spray with electronics cleaner, removes corrosion/oxidation from contacts, decreases resistance/increases conductivity.

Then slobber some dielectric grease on the connectors and plug 'em back together, keeps moisture out.

I've thought this was a good practice and am unaware of any down side to it. It reduces the risk of intermittent/flakey electronics.
 

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It's good and bad, depends how you use it.
Use it sparingly and apply to the male pins only.
Do not pack the connector with it, it can create enough hydraulic pressure when assembled to damage the pins, push them out, or blow out the connector seals.
It is not designed as waterproofing, that's the job of the connector seals.
There have been several TSB's regarding the improper use of dielectric grease, less is more.
It is also called low temp grease.

Do not use it on O2 sensors, some reference air through the harness and connector, it can block this vent.
 

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MMcGuire said:
Would like some input on dielectric grease use on electrical connections.

On snap together electrical connections; I was planning to use QD electronics cleaner. I've read where many people also use dielectric grease. Any experience if this is good practice.

I use dielectric grease on battery connections but I smear it on the outside after I have connected everthing together. I also use it on spark plug boots to seal out moisture.

Any input is appreciated.

Thank you!

Mike
I use it every time I take a connection apart. Fill the mating side of the connectors full and then assemble and let the grease get pushed through the back of the connectors where the wires come out. I don't recommend putting grease in from the wire exit side as that can trap moisture in the connector in a pocket where it will condense and cause corrosion in colder weather. Let the grease work its way out from the inside.
 

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New2rt said:
It's good and bad, depends how you use it.
Use it sparingly and apply to the male pins only.
Do not pack the connector with it, it can create enough hydraulic pressure when assembled to damage the pins, push them out, or blow out the connector seals.
It is not designed as waterproofing, that's the job of the connector seals.
There have been several TSB's regarding the improper use of dielectric grease, less is more.
It is also called low temp grease.

Do not use it on O2 sensors, some reference air through the harness and connector, it can block this vent.
I agree if you are using weatherpack or similar connectors. BMW uses some of these, but many connectors are of the unsealed variety and you want to pack them full of grease and let the hydraulic pressure force the grease out the backside of the connectors.
 

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Every time I take a connector apart, I apply dielectric grease before reassembly.
 

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Always always always use it on the incandescent light bulbs. Keeps them electrically intact and makes them easy to change.

Dielectric grease? Gooooood stuff!

Loren
 
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