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So I've had my 2001 LT for about a year now. I absolutely love it. I have always been comfortable on long-distance rides, and even though many say in town driving is too difficult, I have not ever had that problem. I have used this forum and Kirk's videos to do upgrades to the headlight, the dash lights, and to get recommendations for changing tires etc. THANK YOU! The bike now has 60,000 miles on it and I am getting ready to take it down for the winter. I'm pretty handy with a wrench and I knew I wanted to do several maintenance things, and take the Tupperware off (Brake pads, fuel filter, radiator flush, brake flush, final drive fluid change, etc), but now it seems that I may need to replace my front shock and spring. It looks like the faring is hitting the top of the fender with hard stops and bumps, and there seems to be a leak in the front brake lines and some oil collecting on the center stand (can't tell where that is coming from yet) When I start totaling up the cost of doing all of this, especially replacing the brake lines, shocks and springs, I could almost buy another motorcycle or at least a good down payment on a much newer RT. Cruise control doesn't work and the radio doesn't work but otherwise the bike functions great. So two questions. One- is this bike getting too old and too many miles on it to be spending that kind of money, should I cut and run? Two-are there some budget friendly replacements for brake lines and springs? Just in what I have done so far, the prices for shocks and springs, and the other maintenance that I'm planning to do this winter is going to cost me as much as I paid for the bike in the first place. Any advice is appreciated.
 

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You have reached the point that happens with every vehicle. Is it worth fixing and keeping in working order or is that becoming too expensive? I hate this decision. Then, there is the nagging question of what will break next and require more money. Over the last two years, I have spent too much money getting a car ready for my son to take to college - might should have just sold it and purchased something newer with that money and the money I used to make repairs. This summer, I fixed up our other car and then, took it to get detailed and sold it. Of course, I now have another used car that I have spent money on to bring it up to my standards with some more work to be done.

To avoid more work on your next bike, I would think you need enough money to buy something 2-3 years old at the most. If you get a 2008 RT, you will probably have some work to do on it. Many people spend all their money on getting a used vehicle only to need more money to do some repairs or upgrades or at the least flushing fluids.

Good Luck with the decision! I will be making the same decision at some point with my LT as I plan to run it into the ground over the next decade - doing the routine maintenance and praying the catastrophic doesn't happen.
 

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So I've had my 2001 LT for about a year now. I absolutely love it. I have always been comfortable on long-distance rides, and even though many say in town driving is too difficult, I have not ever had that problem. I have used this forum and Kirk's videos to do upgrades to the headlight, the dash lights, and to get recommendations for changing tires etc. THANK YOU! The bike now has 60,000 miles on it and I am getting ready to take it down for the winter. I'm pretty handy with a wrench and I knew I wanted to do several maintenance things, and take the Tupperware off (Brake pads, fuel filter, radiator flush, brake flush, final drive fluid change, etc), but now it seems that I may need to replace my front shock and spring. It looks like the faring is hitting the top of the fender with hard stops and bumps, and there seems to be a leak in the front brake lines and some oil collecting on the center stand (can't tell where that is coming from yet) When I start totaling up the cost of doing all of this, especially replacing the brake lines, shocks and springs, I could almost buy another motorcycle or at least a good down payment on a much newer RT. Cruise control doesn't work and the radio doesn't work but otherwise the bike functions great. So two questions. One- is this bike getting too old and too many miles on it to be spending that kind of money, should I cut and run? Two-are there some budget friendly replacements for brake lines and springs? Just in what I have done so far, the prices for shocks and springs, and the other maintenance that I'm planning to do this winter is going to cost me as much as I paid for the bike in the first place. Any advice is appreciated.
If you still have the stock rubber lines then yes, there is a better replacement than OEM. Spiegler makes an LT set with everything you need and it is less than buying all the individual lines from the dealer. Finding a distributor may get you a better set than direct I have heard. The distributor sets often include new banjo bolts where the direct set doesn't. Either way, they are far above the original line quality.

Shocks are a tough pill to swallow if you are going to buy new. You could go with a set of Hyper Pro springs and keep your old shocks or if you think it is done, you could buy a gently used one pretty cheap on Ebay and still do the springs for less than a new after market shock. Shocks dampen on the up swing so it is possible that the spring has collapsed in length some and is allowing the front to sag some if it is compressing far enough to hit the fender.

Take a good look and find where the oil is leaking from. Drilling the weep hole in the bell housing may not be a bad idea to keep oil from pooling inside. The seals are not all that expensive but there is a good bit of labor in getting to them. Seal driver sets are available to borrow for the cost of return postage.

60K on that bike is nothing. If you like it, go ahead and put the time and parts into it as long as you plan on keeping it. I made that decision already so I am in the middle of purchasing new shocks for close to 2G but then I plan on keeping it for several more years and it is much less than buying a newer bike that my pillion probably won't like as much ;) Slowly working on renewing things that definitely deteriorate with age like the rubber parts, hoses and fuel lines.

The decision is definitely yours to keep her going or to cut and run but there may be people close to you willing to help with the labor if you have to dig deeper into it to replace seals for the leak. Definitely not too old with only 60K on the dial but is it too old for you? Not the least expensive bike to own but by now, I know what I have and would be comfortable riding it anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You are exactly right Jim. Like I said, I don't mind turning wrenches but at this point I am worried that if I bite the bullet and spend the money on these parts on this older bike, how much longer before something else fails? I have been searching the classifieds, online shopping, and eBay but it seems that used shocks and springs have as many or more miles on them than mine. Then I am back to the same situation.

I did find a 2013 RT 90th anniversary edition that I thought about but it had over 40k on the clock and was still over 12k. I am more of a under 6k-8k buyer with my current situation so you make a good point. At least I know what I have now. Thanks for the input!
 

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If you like your LT, and you'd like to keep her for awhile...

Look here
front shock unit K1200 rs lt gt 1998 to 2005 & R1200r rs 2005 -on build to order | eBay

And here
https://spieglerusa.com/brakes/brake-lines-accessories-tools/cycle-brake-line-kits/make/bmw/model/k-1200-lt/position/front-+-rear.html

For around 600 bucks you could fix most of your issues.

The cruise control can sometimes be fixed fairly easily.
Drill a drain hole in the clutch housing & keep an eye on the leak........
All the other stuff is normal m/c maintenance.

(and who needs a radio on a motorcycle?)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you still have the stock rubber lines then yes, there is a better replacement than OEM. Spiegler makes an LT set with everything you need and it is less than buying all the individual lines from the dealer. Finding a distributor may get you a better set than direct I have heard. The distributor sets often include new banjo bolts where the direct set doesn't. Either way, they are far above the original line quality.

Shocks are a tough pill to swallow if you are going to buy new. You could go with a set of Hyper Pro springs and keep your old shocks or if you think it is done, you could buy a gently used one pretty cheap on Ebay and still do the springs for less than a new after market shock. Shocks dampen on the up swing so it is possible that the spring has collapsed in length some and is allowing the front to sag some if it is compressing far enough to hit the fender.

Take a good look and find where the oil is leaking from. Drilling the weep hole in the bell housing may not be a bad idea to keep oil from pooling inside. The seals are not all that expensive but there is a good bit of labor in getting to them. Seal driver sets are available to borrow for the cost of return postage.

60K on that bike is nothing. If you like it, go ahead and put the time and parts into it as long as you plan on keeping it. I made that decision already so I am in the middle of purchasing new shocks for close to 2G but then I plan on keeping it for several more years and it is much less than buying a newer bike that my pillion probably won't like as much ;) Slowly working on renewing things that definitely deteriorate with age like the rubber parts, hoses and fuel lines.

The decision is definitely yours to keep her going or to cut and run but there may be people close to you willing to help with the labor if you have to dig deeper into it to replace seals for the leak. Definitely not too old with only 60K on the dial but is it too old for you? Not the least expensive bike to own but by now, I know what I have and would be comfortable riding it anywhere.
I have looked at the Spiegler LT set, and had almost pulled the trigger before the shock/spring issue cropped up. I did find it cheaper going through a distributer at $250, so that is still a consideration. And you are right, shocks are a tough pill to swallow. I keep hoping someone on here is parting out a bike with some "gently used" springs/shocks. I have looked on ebay but it seems everything i find has more miles on it than what I have, making me think I'm trading out for the same possible issue.

I need to do some more research on the weep hole. Not sure what that is. I'm sure there are some threads about it.

I guess it is just a lot at one time, and had me nervous with the age and mileage especially with the final drive failure you hear so much about (although I have not seen any issues with mine). Maybe I'll keep trolling here and ebay for shocks/springs. I definitely can't afford to go new at the 2K price. I enjoy the bike so the age only is an issue when it comes to replacing these high priced parts.

Thanks for the input!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If you like your LT, and you'd like to keep her for awhile...

Look here
front shock unit K1200 rs lt gt 1998 to 2005 & R1200r rs 2005 -on build to order | eBay

And here
https://spieglerusa.com/brakes/brake-lines-accessories-tools/cycle-brake-line-kits/make/bmw/model/k-1200-lt/position/front-+-rear.html

For around 600 bucks you could fix most of your issues.

The cruise control can sometimes be fixed fairly easily.
Drill a drain hole in the clutch housing & keep an eye on the leak........
All the other stuff is normal m/c maintenance.

(and who needs a radio on a motorcycle?)
I do like my LT, and I would like to keep her, I guess I just got some sticker shock when looking for parts. The radio never really worried me (although it does bug me a little when something doesn't work). I would like to get the cruise fixed, although I've never had that on any bike. Thanks for the links. I had found the Spieglar line sets, but that is a cheaper new shock/spring than I have seen. I was looking $700-$1100 just for these in my searches. Even just the spring switch for front and back was going to be $600.

Maybe I just need to do some more digging...like you say this might not be as expensive as I first thought.
 

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I do like my LT, and I would like to keep her, I guess I just got some sticker shock when looking for parts. The radio never really worried me (although it does bug me a little when something doesn't work). I would like to get the cruise fixed, although I've never had that on any bike. Thanks for the links. I had found the Spieglar line sets, but that is a cheaper new shock/spring than I have seen. I was looking $700-$1100 just for these in my searches. Even just the spring switch for front and back was going to be $600.

Maybe I just need to do some more digging...like you say this might not be as expensive as I first thought.
You have to know how to find things for the LT that don't come from the dealer or ask on the forum like you are not if you are capable of doing it yourself like the springs for the LT from HyperPro. Last I saw they were around 239.00 for the front/rear pair and you can also buy just front or rear. Prices below are from a post in 2011 but they can't be much more than that now. Caution must be used when replacing springs as they can cause severe bodily harm if not done properly with the correct tools.

Fork Springs BMW K 1200 LT 99> SP-BM12-SSN002 $119.95

Shock Springs BMW K 1200 LT 99> SP-BM12-SSB002 $119.95

Combi-Kit BMW K 1200 LT 99> SP-BM12-SSL002 $239.95


Cruise is often just a maladjusted throttle cable or a switch. Many try and remove all play from the throttle but that compresses the cruise kill switch and the cruise will not engage. Folks here can walk you through some checks to see if it is an easy fix.

My radio also only works sporadically so I just ignore it and use an MP3 player over my headset.
 

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So I've had my 2001 LT for about a year now. I absolutely love it. I have always been comfortable on long-distance rides, and even though many say in town driving is too difficult, I have not ever had that problem. I have used this forum and Kirk's videos to do upgrades to the headlight, the dash lights, and to get recommendations for changing tires etc. THANK YOU! The bike now has 60,000 miles on it and I am getting ready to take it down for the winter. I'm pretty handy with a wrench and I knew I wanted to do several maintenance things, and take the Tupperware off (Brake pads, fuel filter, radiator flush, brake flush, final drive fluid change, etc), but now it seems that I may need to replace my front shock and spring. It looks like the faring is hitting the top of the fender with hard stops and bumps, and there seems to be a leak in the front brake lines and some oil collecting on the center stand (can't tell where that is coming from yet) When I start totaling up the cost of doing all of this, especially replacing the brake lines, shocks and springs, I could almost buy another motorcycle or at least a good down payment on a much newer RT. Cruise control doesn't work and the radio doesn't work but otherwise the bike functions great. So two questions. One- is this bike getting too old and too many miles on it to be spending that kind of money, should I cut and run? Two-are there some budget friendly replacements for brake lines and springs? Just in what I have done so far, the prices for shocks and springs, and the other maintenance that I'm planning to do this winter is going to cost me as much as I paid for the bike in the first place. Any advice is appreciated.
In purely economic terms, unless you have a real lemon, it is almost always cheaper to fix what you have.

And I don't believe in making my analyse by looking backward. I don't look at repair costs compared to "what it's worth." I look at the cost I avoid. I had a Chevy truck I kept for 20 years. After about 10 years, it needed about one major repair a year. Differential rebuilds, u-joints, brakes, water pump, etc. that cost $800-1200 each time. When the trucks value dropped below $5,000, my wife always asked why I put so much money into "that old truck." I always replied that if it lasted two more months, I had my money back as a new truck was about $500/month payment. And the truck ran well and never left me stranded as I fixed things before they broke in most cases.

So, I look at repairs in the context of what a newer vehicle costs. Now, if the issue really isn't enonomics, but simply that one wants a newer vehicle with newer technology and features, then that is a completely different situation.
 

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I have looked at the Spiegler LT set, and had almost pulled the trigger before the shock/spring issue cropped up. I did find it cheaper going through a distributer at $250, so that is still a consideration. And you are right, shocks are a tough pill to swallow. I keep hoping someone on here is parting out a bike with some "gently used" springs/shocks. I have looked on ebay but it seems everything i find has more miles on it than what I have, making me think I'm trading out for the same possible issue.

I need to do some more research on the weep hole. Not sure what that is. I'm sure there are some threads about it.

I guess it is just a lot at one time, and had me nervous with the age and mileage especially with the final drive failure you hear so much about (although I have not seen any issues with mine). Maybe I'll keep trolling here and ebay for shocks/springs. I definitely can't afford to go new at the 2K price. I enjoy the bike so the age only is an issue when it comes to replacing these high priced parts.

Thanks for the input!!!
There are 2 weep holes that can be drilled. The one you would be immediately interested in requires no disassembly. It is simply a small hole drilled in the bottom of the clutch bellhouising. the clutch is dry so no issue with drilling a hole there. What this does is allow any oil leaking from the rear main seal to find a way out rather than collect in the bottom of the housing. It can hold a good bit and if enough collects, it can contaminate your clutch and ruin your day pretty much. the signs you have of leaks may well be the rear main seal as the other leaks can do in the clutch as they leak directly into it. a 1/8 in hole is usually sufficient to allow any oil to drain and you can get a good idea on how much is leaking. See the attached picture for where to drill the hole. Keep in mind the clutch is also in that space so don't ram the drill all the way in. Once through the case, you are done. and you can drill it directly from underneath.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You have to know how to find things for the LT that don't come from the dealer or ask on the forum like you are not if you are capable of doing it yourself like the springs for the LT from HyperPro. Last I saw they were around 239.00 for the front/rear pair and you can also buy just front or rear. Prices below are from a post in 2011 but they can't be much more than that now. Caution must be used when replacing springs as they can cause severe bodily harm if not done properly with the correct tools.

Fork Springs BMW K 1200 LT 99> SP-BM12-SSN002 $119.95

Shock Springs BMW K 1200 LT 99> SP-BM12-SSB002 $119.95

Combi-Kit BMW K 1200 LT 99> SP-BM12-SSL002 $239.95


Cruise is often just a maladjusted throttle cable or a switch. Many try and remove all play from the throttle but that compresses the cruise kill switch and the cruise will not engage. Folks here can walk you through some checks to see if it is an easy fix.

My radio also only works sporadically so I just ignore it and use an MP3 player over my headset.
Thanks Gordon. I have done several searches for this same part number for the combo kit and the only thing I could find was on ebay, and it was about $270. But I was a little concerned about, like you said, changing them myself could be dangerous. I'm not usually gunshy of doing something I've never done before, but my father always taught me there is usually a "right tool" for the job. If you don't have one get it or take it to someone who has it. I saw Kirks design in the video, but wonder if the expense would be justified since I may never use it again. I dunno. After doing the cruise control sensor test, it looks like the sensor on the footbrake may be the culprit. Figured I would mess with that when/if I took all the tupperware off.

I'm starting to feel better and get encouraged that doing the fixes is the way to go. Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
...

So, I look at repairs in the context of what a newer vehicle costs. Now, if the issue really isn't enonomics, but simply that one wants a newer vehicle with newer technology and features, then that is a completely different situation.
True. This is my first BMW, and after calculating the repair and replacement parts costs over the past year and what needed to be done this winter, I thought it may be my last. That being said, some of the guys are helping me find ways around the high costs (which for me is a big issue, and yes it is economics). It would have almost been cheaper to make a payment, but once it is done, hopefully I'll get another couple of years with just maintenance costs. This is definitely helping me see your point of view. The BMW dealer is not much help here and I don't know of anyone else around my neck of the woods with an LT.
 

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Thanks Gordon. I have done several searches for this same part number for the combo kit and the only thing I could find was on ebay, and it was about $270. But I was a little concerned about, like you said, changing them myself could be dangerous. I'm not usually gunshy of doing something I've never done before, but my father always taught me there is usually a "right tool" for the job. If you don't have one get it or take it to someone who has it. I saw Kirks design in the video, but wonder if the expense would be justified since I may never use it again. I dunno. After doing the cruise control sensor test, it looks like the sensor on the footbrake may be the culprit. Figured I would mess with that when/if I took all the tupperware off.

I'm starting to feel better and get encouraged that doing the fixes is the way to go. Thanks again!
I think Kirk has lent that tool out in the past so it would be worth a PM to see if he would again. Also, auto machine shops might do it for a few dollars locally so checking that avenue also. Being the off season, Kirk may just do it for you if you paid the postage for the shock and spring shipping. Being the off season you could stand the bike being apart for a week or so during shipping. It may be worth asking as I can't speak for him but if I had the tool, I would be happy to do it for you but that is one I haven't made yet as I went the total shock route.

Just a note on the foot brake. Some have adjusted it so tight trying to get faster response that it never allows fluid to flow back into the reservoir and that can cause the rear brake to lock up and possibly catch fire with heavy breaking and the fluid expands from heating up and cascades. It may just need to be loosened up a little.

Good luck
 
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The local suspension shop changed my springs after I removed them 40 bucks. I reused my old shocks the height came up nicely but it still wobbles a bit hard into corners, due to my old shocks.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
The local suspension shop changed my springs after I removed them 40 bucks. I reused my old shocks the height came up nicely but it still wobbles a bit hard into corners, due to my old shocks.
I may try that. Just to try and ease my mind I went to the closest BMW dealer today and test drove some newer bikes. I like mine better. I guess I just need to keep working through this. I'm pretty sure I'll be happier.
 

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So I've had my 2001 LT for about a year now. I absolutely love it. I have always been comfortable on long-distance rides, and even though many say in town driving is too difficult, I have not ever had that problem. I have used this forum and Kirk's videos to do upgrades to the headlight, the dash lights, and to get recommendations for changing tires etc. THANK YOU! The bike now has 60,000 miles on it and I am getting ready to take it down for the winter. I'm pretty handy with a wrench and I knew I wanted to do several maintenance things, and take the Tupperware off (Brake pads, fuel filter, radiator flush, brake flush, final drive fluid change, etc), but now it seems that I may need to replace my front shock and spring. It looks like the faring is hitting the top of the fender with hard stops and bumps, and there seems to be a leak in the front brake lines and some oil collecting on the center stand (can't tell where that is coming from yet) When I start totaling up the cost of doing all of this, especially replacing the brake lines, shocks and springs, I could almost buy another motorcycle or at least a good down payment on a much newer RT. Cruise control doesn't work and the radio doesn't work but otherwise the bike functions great. So two questions. One- is this bike getting too old and too many miles on it to be spending that kind of money, should I cut and run? Two-are there some budget friendly replacements for brake lines and springs? Just in what I have done so far, the prices for shocks and springs, and the other maintenance that I'm planning to do this winter is going to cost me as much as I paid for the bike in the first place. Any advice is appreciated.
Think how much a new K1600GTL costs. You can put a lot of money into your LT and still come out ahead
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So went test riding yesterday....Yeah I knew I couldn't afford the K1600GTL, and they didn't have a used one, so I tested out a 2013 90th anniversary RT, a 2013 1200GSA, and a 2008 K1200GT. None of them rode as good as my LT as far as comfort. I didn't like the boxer engine on either of the RT or GSA. It seemed to run really rough compared to the LT, but I guess it is all in what you are used to. I guess I could have farkled and accessorized them up for my riding style, but in the end as I said, neither was as comfortable plus as David said, I can fix what I have much cheaper, and come out ahead.

So now that I am committing to keeping the old girl, its time to get down to business. I am shopping the best deals on brake lines, pads, springs etc. Any pointers here are appreciated too. I notice that the 24K maintenance kit from beemer boneyard has replacement o-rings for fuel lines and a transmission and final drive crush ring set. Do you guys change those, or is it cheaper to buy the just individual parts in this kit and leave off things you don't change? Keep in mind I'm at 60K on the odo. Any advice?
 

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Think how much a new K1600GTL costs. You can put a lot of money into your LT and still come out ahead
That is a big part of my analysis. And the fact that I have rented a GTL and GTLE for two different two week rides, and I come back and still like my LT better.
:smile:
 
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So went test riding yesterday....Yeah I knew I couldn't afford the K1600GTL, and they didn't have a used one, so I tested out a 2013 90th anniversary RT, a 2013 1200GSA, and a 2008 K1200GT. None of them rode as good as my LT as far as comfort. I didn't like the boxer engine on either of the RT or GSA. It seemed to run really rough compared to the LT, but I guess it is all in what you are used to. I guess I could have farkled and accessorized them up for my riding style, but in the end as I said, neither was as comfortable plus as David said, I can fix what I have much cheaper, and come out ahead.

So now that I am committing to keeping the old girl, its time to get down to business. I am shopping the best deals on brake lines, pads, springs etc. Any pointers here are appreciated too. I notice that the 24K maintenance kit from beemer boneyard has replacement o-rings for fuel lines and a transmission and final drive crush ring set. Do you guys change those, or is it cheaper to buy the just individual parts in this kit and leave off things you don't change? Keep in mind I'm at 60K on the odo. Any advice?
I try and keep most of those things on hand, extra crush washers and o-rings etc just in case. I have bought the individual parts from multiple places but not the BBY kit yet. It should beat hands down any cost from the dealer for that list of parts though. I bought the Mahle OC91 filter on Amazon for 12.46 and dealer filter is 20.31, fuel filter for 13.98, dealer 38.91 just as an example. I usually get my crush rings from the local dealer and buy several at a time as they are cheap. The kit is not a bad deal on that list of parts. Take the 4 main parts, air, oil, plugs and fuel filter and you are already at 167.74 for those 4 parts with no oil, washers or o-rings. Many people do the kits because it is a good deal. Doing your own maintenance, you will use all the parts in the kit even if you don't use them every time and it never hurts to have o-rings or crush rings as spares.
 

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That is a big part of my analysis. And the fact that I have rented a GTL and GTLE for two different two week rides, and I come back and still like my LT better.
:smile:
Me too. I test road a GTL with my girlfriend. While I liked the performance of the GTL better, the LT was undoubtedly more comfortable for the pillion and I did not see enough of a difference to buy the GTL prior to riding the LT into the ground.
 
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