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I have Bridgestone B23 tyres front and rear on my RT. I also ride with no side panniers and a 28 litre top box. I weigh 200 pounds. What tyre pressures do you recommend for front and rear. Also if I do fully load all panniers without a pillion what should the PSI be increased to. The manual for my bike has listed front at 32 and rear at 36 but talking to a few RT owners they seem to be running much higher than this. All opinions gratefully received, thanks Richard.
 

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36 psi front, 42 psi rear,
 
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I don't mean to hijack the thread, just wanted some more info. I have been putting 38-39 front, and 42 rear since reading a lot of posts here that recommended those pressures. I just put a set of Michelin PR 3's on last week, and put in the same pressure. I noticed that the bike seemed a little "squirmy" when coming up behind transport or other vehicles that disturbed the air a lot when following them. I am wondering if the pressure is too high on front wheel causing it to have this issue. I am thinking maybe higher pressure makes the front wheel to have less contact with the road causing this "squirmy" feel. It was like the front wheel couldn't decide which way it wanted to go. I see Jeff Dean recommends a lower pressure and I really respect his knowledgeable posts, so I think he may have addressed my problem, I just wanted some more feedback.
 

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I tried the factory recommended 32/36 with the OEM Bridgestones and got pretty poor mileage and unimpressive handling. First set of PR2s was about when I joined this forum and settled on 36/40 per the consensus here (no doubt heavily influenced by Mr. Dean). Much better, crisper handling. I ran that for both sets of PR2s. Got a set of PR3s a couple of months ago and set them at the same pressures. For some reason I bumped them up to 38/42 and find even better handling without being squirrelly. I've tried higher but the ride seemed to get harsh without any corresponding increase in handling quality. So I've settled on 38/42, but I do allow them to drift downwards a couple of psi before I break out the compressor.

BTW, that's single rider, dark side of 200 lbs and kinda dumpy, with panniers.

JayJay
 

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The BMW tech at the dealership here in Dallas told me 36/42 regardless of load, all the time. Rode the twisties all the way to MOA and it's the best it has ever handled (some credit to the brand new PR2's). 2K miles and no noticeable wear.
 

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skydiver, once you get about 1k miles on the tires that squirming might go away. If not, then you might try changing psi in two lbs increments and see if it changes. Good luck.
 

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patsmith said:
skydiver, once you get about 1k miles on the tires that squirming might go away. If not, then you might try changing psi in two lbs increments and see if it changes. Good luck.
+1

The stuff they use for the mould release hangs on a bit and make things feel slick now and then. After the tires are scuffed-up a bit, you'll notice a good difference.

FWIW,
 

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four12 said:
The stock answer should be "whatever is indicated on the sidewall of the tyre, in accordance with the manufacture's specifications."

NEVER NEVER NEVER

The ONLY thing indicated on a tire sidewall is the MAXIMUM permitted inflation pressure. This is seldom or never the manufacturer's running recommendation.
 

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lkchris said:
NEVER NEVER NEVER

The ONLY thing indicated on a tire sidewall is the MAXIMUM permitted inflation pressure. This is seldom or never the manufacturer's running recommendation.
I agree. Only the max.
The bike manufacturers tend to recommend lower pressures, but I spoke to the Michelin rep at a dealer open house and he confirmed that higher is better. I'm also running 38/42 and like it with the new PR3s. They're new (about 400 miles) and the handling is fine. I weigh 185 and usually only have a top box on the bike, one up.
 

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Yes Yes Yes. The maximum on the side of the tire is the maximum amount of air that the tire can ever hold. Not not not what you should be riding at, and that is true on any tire, including your car, truck or motorcycle.
I cannot understand why that mis information persists.
The recommended tire pressure for almost any vehicle is ON THE VEHICLE. On your bike it will be on a sticker near the rear wheel. On your car on a panel around a door or on the glove box.
Also it may be in the glove box book. Not the repair manual.
The glove box book is also known as the owners manual and is not the repair manual.
On my RT I usually shoot for 36 and 41. I think that's what's on my book or sticker.
Oh, here it is. Single rider, cold tire: 31.9 and 36.3.
Rider, passenger and/or load, cold tire: 36.3 and 42.1
dc
 

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lkchris said:
NEVER NEVER NEVER

The ONLY thing indicated on a tire sidewall is the MAXIMUM permitted inflation pressure. This is seldom or never the manufacturer's running recommendation.
+1

The tire manufacturer has no idea what bikes the tires will be fitted to, so they list the maximum safe pressure for any application. Just as my compressor has a label reading "125 lb max" on it, that doesn't mean that's the correct pressure for every particular application.

The motorcycle manufacturers do extensive testing of the factory-fitted tires and have the best idea of the correct pressures when installed on their bikes.
 

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I run 40/40.
 

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skydiver said:
I don't mean to hijack the thread, just wanted some more info. I have been putting 38-39 front, and 42 rear since reading a lot of posts here that recommended those pressures. I just put a set of Michelin PR 3's on last week, and put in the same pressure. I noticed that the bike seemed a little "squirmy" when coming up behind transport or other vehicles that disturbed the air a lot when following them. I am wondering if the pressure is too high on front wheel causing it to have this issue. I am thinking maybe higher pressure makes the front wheel to have less contact with the road causing this "squirmy" feel. It was like the front wheel couldn't decide which way it wanted to go. I see Jeff Dean recommends a lower pressure and I really respect his knowledgeable posts, so I think he may have addressed my problem, I just wanted some more feedback.
When I first got my PR3s they felt unstable to me when in the straight vertical, whether riding os stopped. At some point this feeling went away. I think the center tread needs to be flattened out with mileage. It is a harder compound than the side treads.

I just follow the mfgr recommendation for pressure.
 

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Look under the seat. There is a sticker that tells you. When in doubt, look there.

That's all I have ever gone by and no issues thus far. I have run Conti Road Attacks and Metzlers (don't remember the model name).
 
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I get the owner's manual stating pressures, I get the sticker under the seat with recommended tire pressures.

What I don't get is how they know what tire I'm running. I would think that would make a difference.

bob
 
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