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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You know the story: cheap RTP turns into an expensive project getting it set up for a pillion.
I picked up this 09 with 35k miles on it from an elderly gentleman who was tired of dropping it in the parking lot. Good thing RTPs have GREAT crash bars!

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It came with a binder and folder of info. Unfortunately the tires were worn badly due to improper inflation and poor suspension. I noticed immediately that the rear wallowed badly. Preload didn’t help either not sure what was up but YSS front and rear suspension are already on the way from Ted Porters.

In the meantime I sourced a passenger seat and grab handles but couldn’t find a rear seat latch. I messaged 5 sellers and they either didn’t have one or wouldnot break up a lock set to sell it to me even after I suggested nobody needs a seat latch when replacing a lock set.

I noticed the G650 seat latch was an unusual trifecta of cheap, readily available and seemingly would fit. I took a chance and here’s the result:

It bolts right up and works. However you have to rig something to allow it to release if you cover the area that they removed on the tail section to fit the relay gang and radio trunk box.

The trunk/radio pack has a latch that won’t work but the lock and cable above the license plate could.

I figured I’d give it a shot and worst case scenario I’d loop some picture hanging wire around the handle and send it out a drilled hole in the wheel well.

I really wanted the key and latch to work though so I remove me the cable from the trunk latch. I then took a 1/4” P-clamp and removed the rubber insulation. Then I notched the clamp with a hack saw to allow an e-clip (if that’s the correct term) to drop into the recess of the ferrule end. This will prevent the cable housing from moving in the clamp.

Wood Bumper Automotive exterior Rim Gas

What I mean by e-clip is pictured below (obviously the wrong size!)
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I then cut off one side of the release handle and drilled through the handle to accept a cotter pin shouldered by a couple of stainless washers.

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Wood Gas Wire Cable Heat-shrink tubing

Note below the line of pull. It’s important that the cable sit lower than the pivot as just pulling horizontally will not lead to enough travel in the latch.
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Btw I did all of this with the plastic tail section next to me on the work bench. I removed the two torx screws for the lock but couldn’t get it to come off the tail section. Theres likely a way if I had googled it just didn’t seem vital.

The next step was choosing a spot for the p-clamp. If I did it again I’d have cut the handle on the left side and cut the other end of the p clamp for the e clip to suit as putting it on the right interfered with the TPMS module plug on my bike. To correct I put a small stainless nut under the single screw in the module mount. This also gave a little more room for the wires to fit under and allowed me to line up the relays along the back wall wires down to keep any water out.
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The handle isn’t cracked, it’s just the lighting. I left one end long just in case there was ever any issue I could hook a wire hanger over it and release the seat.

I also used a star washer (the kind used to make a quick ground connection under a ring terminal) to keep the p clamp from pivoting. I used an m6 stainless bolt with a nylock up top. It won’t ever seize up if it got some corrosion but tightens down well due to the slop in the threads on nylock nuts. That said I drilled a very close tolerance to the bolt to prevent any water making it way into the tail section. I also put a vacuum cap over the cotterpin legs/left side of release handle to prevent any abuse if a harness wire somehow wanders free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I managed to remove part of the radio or service vehicle harness too. Lots of clipping zip ties and unwinding some tape yielded this:

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Gas Art Pattern Circle Twig

I think I cut one wire along the way that was clearly not part of the rest of the bike. Everything else in this harness was carefully unplugged. The great thing was this bike was never set up for police duty. The story goes that the original owner was a bicycle race course referee and this was a sort of chase vehicle as evidenced by the US Cycling Motoref decals I’d say it’s true. I understand the RTP gearing is desirable as you can putt along without frying the clutch or split at a moments notice. I digress… point being there was nothing hacked out of the bike and it didn’t have a gazillion odd wires hanging around (only half a gazillion) or holes in the bodywork for lights and such.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I removed the auxiliary battery mostly to get the glove box storage but it has heft as well. It weighs 14 lbs for those curious and to my understanding only begins charging after 3500 rpm if the main battery is topped up. The issue is it doesn’t really serve any purpose. You can’t start the bike with it, it’s specifically to run a police radio or accessories like emergency lights when stopped/bike not running. On my bike nothing was hooked up to it aside from the charging connections so out it came. I debated keeping it for an emergency jump but it just seemed unnecessary. I plan to cap and wrap the leads as trying to chase it back in the harness just means more unwrapping of tape to figure out where it goes. I’ll leave the charging relay plugged in too unless someone here thinks I ought to disconnect it.

I might even remove the speakers up front to shave some weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Replaced my headlights (H11) with LED. Man those plugs sure get brittle with age/heat. Two cracked while unplugging the bulbs. Heat shrink to the rescue just in case they happen to rub up against anything.

Also, what a PITA clipping them in. Found a pencil with a hacksaw notch helped tremendously.
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Those headlight connectors are known to get brittle and virtually fall apart at your fingertips. I replaced mine with a short ceramic connector. You can just slide each bare blade into the bulb terminal. Many have with no issues.
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Those headlight connectors are known to get brittle and virtually fall apart at your fingertips. I replaced mine with a short ceramic connector. You can just slide each bare blade into the bulb terminal. Many have with no issues. View attachment 178262
I debated directly connecting mine as well since the LED lights have a pigtail already. How did you insulate the connection?
 

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I debated directly connecting mine as well since the LED lights have a pigtail already. How did you insulate the connection?
I just plugged it in to my short replacement harrness. I don't recall if I used the OEM pins or crimped on insulated ones. Its been a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Time for some new tires while I’m at it.
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The zip tie method was way easier. Nearly knocked my teeth out with pry bars and tire levers. A cut up plastic detergent bottle protected the rim but only needed a little coaxing with the lever in one spot going on. Lots of soapy water too. Coming off I did use a rubber mallet too. Harbor Freight zip ties weren’t the strongest but most lasted through both front and rear tire changes off/on as I released the lock tab with a small common screwdriver.

Full disclosure: Bead breaker made it easier but I could have used C clamps to get the old beads broke as well.

Used the bubble balancer for the rear due to the oversized hub.

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Front on a harbor freight spin balancer. If you buy one, check the bearings before you leave the store. I butchered two packages to make one good kit. I think they’re on closeout now too.
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Seating the tires went quick even with the valve cores in. Mind your fingers kids.

Another while you’re in there job- new tpms batteries. I held the top contact down with a pick until the hot glue set then I added a blob on top so the zip tie would really compress the whole thing.
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A dremel made it easier but I messed up the front one. Got one on Amazon. Hopefully the programming with the gs-911 goes well, the number is a lot shorter on the new one. Hope it won’t be an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Rear brakes looked sad. Inspection reveals clean pucks (if a little corroded at perimeters), but rusty guide pins, 1 pitted kinda bad.
Wire wheel and some Emory cloth, greased with caliper grease and the news pads should last a long while now.
Note the anti-seize on the hub and pad retainer pin (not pictured).
Bicycle part Gas Auto part Rim Metal

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oh yeah- also changed the final drive oil, fill and drain plug o-ring and crush washer, and of course inspected the drive shaft and free play. A little ease of movement and a little tighter outside the normal range of motion of the knuckle but should be alright. I’ve read it can do that in 25k and this bike is only at 34. Fingers crossed. Re-greased the spines with moly too.
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Sorry the pics are out of order. Computer says no.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
so I broke my own rule about not cutting into the harness. In my defense these wires up front were all ending in unused plugs which were capped. I trimmed the wires at unequal lengths and then twisted the whole lot. This is to prevent any contact even though none tested as having voltage with the key on or off. Actually there’s one and I set it aside. Red with a white stripe and 12v w key on. Could come in handy.
I then shrink tubed the lot, squeezed some dielectric grease in the end to prevent any future corrosive arcing, put a cap on that and then shrink tubed the cap, wrapped it in Tesa cloth tape and zip tied it olongapo the harness in an upward and forward angle. It would be damn near impossible for water to get in or anything to contact a wire in the bundle. Looks like mostly grounds anyway. Of course all along the way I would reconnect the fuel tank and make sure she ran, all functions worked and no error codes shown in the gs-911.
Laborious? You bet. Now I know why RTPs sell cheap (besides the usual fears of wear/tear).
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
New alternator belt…

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right one is new, left (green) is old.

I think you can disregard the numbers on the photo below. The correct belt numbers are on the box.
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grit in the old belt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Clutch fluid (Magura Blood) was purchased but service history shows it was recently changed along with the rest so I left it alone.
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Got some nice led marker lights to replace the old filament style bulbs. HUGE difference.
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guess which is LED…
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Note that the circuit board is not protected seemingly. If they corrode I’ll report back in this thread. Might smear a little dielectric on the not lighted portion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Found a broken windshield bracket. I thought the windscreen seemed a touch floppy. It’s not the supporting/pivot arm that broke, but the bracket they attach to that in turn bolts to the windshield. Broke in a way the split above and below the pivot (actually diagonally such that the pivot pin held it together).



What follows is likely an obtuse explanation of me saving $147.

I went to two welders.
The first one would attempt a repair but said it might blow apart (being possibly pot metal) if it’s not aluminum. But they’d do it for $60 if they could.
The second said it seemed too heavy to be aluminum which I agreed and said he wouldn’t want to attempt it. He also scraped at it with a razor just like the first guy but along the break. Dude I might need to mess with JB Weld don’t do that!!

So yeah brought it home, noted where the pivoting arm swings on the other side with some tape and then bolted the two halves together through the pivot arm hole with thin copper crush washers stacked between to hold the two halves in alignment. I then drilled them both to accept a small bolt in the area where the pivoting arm does not reach.

I first attempted to bolt them together but the material the second welder removed allowed the two halves to collapse too close together and on an angle with the center bolt removed even with filed washers and bushings stacked between the halves on the two bolts I had drilled holes for.

Instead I removed the spacers from those fixing bolts which were getting in the way of the windshield arm even though I filed/ground them considerably, put a bead of JB weld (5 min set, 1 hr cure variety) between the two halves of the fracture and bolted it back up through the center support (bolt and copper washers stacked in the pivot hole).

I let it cure 30-40 min then removed the center support in the pivot hole and scraped away extra material while still a touch soft to clearance room for the pivot arm as noted in part by the Delrin washer mark inside the bracket and aided by the other arm which as mentioned earlier I marked with foil tape the extent of swing on the arm.

On the outside I had to get creative with either a filed aluminum bushing or barring that, JB Weld to create a flat spot for the washer and nut to perch. All of that was worked out long the way but shown here:
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Foil tape to mark where the pivot arm travels.
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It should hold. I used blue loctite on the nuts too. Heck it even seemed to hold albeit a touch floppy with only the mating surfaces of the break, the pivot and the windshield screws prior to the repair so I’m hopeful!
 

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