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With the LT my touring has increased dramatically and I find myself riding at night more. So, I now understand what all of the complaints about the OEM headlight are about. I was thinking of putting lights under the tip over wings, but then again I like them under the front cowling. I know this is a personal preference decision, but which one gives better road lighting? Also, the more I seriously look at the lighting options the more confused I become. PIAA 1100X lights seem to be popular, but I notice there is also a 1100X Powersport, the 0004 model and several others. I admit to not knowing what HID lighting even is. Will a headlight replacement bulb really make that much of a difference? Bottom line is I want to light up the road, be seen better in the daylight, with lights that look nice on the bike and not spend a ton of money. Other than that, everything is going just fine.
 

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A HID headlight makes a HUGE improvement over stock.

Find someone locally who has HID and PIAA 1100's and compare at night. The PIAAs can only be used as a high beam suppliment as they will blind on coming vehicles. A HID low beam may do the same unless you have it pointed all of the way down. I have never had anyone flash their lights at me with my HID.

Once you see them, you will buy the HIDs.

Just be aware, HID's refits are illegal in the US. IMHO, I would rather see and not wreck.
 

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HID is not just a replacement bulb. There should be a ballast and a starter. It will make an unbelievable difference. I chose the MOTO Lights that fit on the forks, they light up the road right in front of the bike.

I would suggest the HID first and then decide how much more light you will need. The HID will make enough difference by itself. although the Moto Lights will give you some visibility with other motorist. Although I think lightning would not get some peoples attention.
 

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I have preached against HID lighting for some time now...but only because I feel that one needs supplemental lighting FIRST, before installing an HID kit. Once you have something else in place, then you can consider an HID replacement kit. The price of HID kits are finally coming down too. Glad I waited. I will be ordering a kit within the next few weeks (months?)...you know, when I get around to it. Perhaps a winter project. In northeast Ohio, I need a few of those.

I am a Motolight fan, but obviously PIAA makes some pretty good stuff. IMHO, the wider you can place the lights, the more visible you are AND the better they lamps will light the road. I have two sets of Motolights, and the outer pair gives me more visibility all around.






Motolights are NOT cheap...but the quality is top notch. And I simply can't say enough about the company. A class act!

As far as what HID is...basically it's a complete replacement for you H7 and/or H4 lamps. Kinda think of them as fluorescent bulbs on Mega-Steroids! You can read about it by clicking HERE.

And to answer your question about replacing your stock lamps with aftermarket. IMHO, some aftermarket bulbs may make your light look whiter, but NOT brighter. I purchased a Silvania SilverStar and compared it to my brother's LT with the OEM bulb...no difference as far as lighting up the road. Just looked a little whiter, like I've already stated.

Good luck. You have every reason to be VERY confused.
 

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Brian,
I bought the under the mirror brackets and hella Micro's(non hid) From Raffy and I'm very pleased with them. Its nice to get the lights up higher.
 

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Then you were "preaching" about something you had no experience with. Not a good thing to do, as you develop no credibility. After doing a lot of lighting mods on my bike, and riding it a LOT at night for 4 years, I am solidly in the camp of "HID FIRST", then other additional lighting. Mainly because I feel it is more important to actually see at night than have the additional "to be seen" lighting for daylight, which is also important. (If one does not ride at night, then that has to be taken into account). I also noticed that after adding the HID low beam, I had far fewer people "surprised" by my existence when lane splitting than I did with stock lighting. If I get another bike when I get moved to TN I am going to really miss lane splitting!

When you get your HID, you may switch camps too. :D
 

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I agree with Mr. Shealey on this one. If the basic lighting isn't good enough and there's an upgrade path, fix that first (via HID in this case). Once you have the base issue resolved, then, if needed, adding other lighting for enhanced visibility, wider light patterns at nights (watch for those horned rats ;) ), fog, etc., is the logical next step.
 

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Seems the highway patrol likes the moto light because they are highly effective at being spotted in the daytime. Motorists are complaining about the HID lights being too bright or more likely they are just aimed too high. There is a consideration to ban the HIDs. Probably due the 'screw them we'll blind them' attitude 'some' motorcyclists have about others in general. The moto lights do help with night light, and I can see moto lights in the brightest sun for the added visibility and the add in being able to see at night. HIDs are probable better than sliced bread for seeing at night, but be considerate of fellow motorist or they are gonna be out of here.
 

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I am pretty sure MOST of the complaints are "Those darned blue lights", which are mostly blue coated halogen bulbs installed as a fashion statement, not true HID (or those silly 6000 degree plus HID's). HID is no worse than halogen if aimed properly, and in a lens/reflector system that does not scatter the light. There are a pretty high percentage of factory HIDs on the road now, and those are not a problem for oncoming drivers. Fortunately, the LT lens/reflector still has a very nice, sharp top cut-off of the low beam when converted, and if aimed properly does not bother oncoming drivers. With over three years of heavy riding, with a lot of it at night, I was never flashed by an oncoming driver. I aimed my low beam so that it was below the normal trunk lip and side view mirrors of cars in front of me.
 

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I thought I would chime here and relay my experience this morning at 7 AM.

A car almost (close call) pulled out in front off me in an intersection. After I successfully avoided him by using the other lane he follwed me as pulled into the next service station and said sorry. NIce of him, but what was interesting was that he mentioned my one light blended into the car behind me giving giving him a false impression of my bike being further back.

My though is that having driving lights lower, or spaced differently than a car would help. I do not have HID's just the OEM Light.

I would wonder if a single HID would help in this case, but I sure Aux lights would.
 

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I'm with David -- both posts! :)

A properly-aimed, 4100K HID is *not* a problem -- I don't get flashed, and the drivers around DC are not known for politeness!


Sorry, Joe -- it's not often I will say this, but you are completely off the mark about the order to proceed for improved *lighting* (i.e., improving what *you* can see). HID first, HID first, HID first! By far the single most effective way to increase lighting for low-beam operation.

If, however, the objective is to increase *visibility* (what *they* see), then you're right -- go with mutliple lights and make a rolling light display.

Me, I wanted both, so I did the HID and a pair of 1100X's under the nose at the same time, just as soon as the new bike made it into the garage.
 

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Mark -- Perhaps I failed to make my case . . . and obviously, please feel free to correct me if my perception is wrong. I have truly grown to appreciate the output of HIDs. Just trying to be smart about it. (Hard to believe, I know.)

Say for instance all you do to a stock LT is the low-beam/high-beam HID conversion. Then you're on a trip and you lose your HID low beam, for whatever reason (the relay, the ballast, the bulb, etc.). You're pretty much S.O.L., IMO. Maybe I'm wrong here. You tell me. Until the bulbs and components are readily available at auto parts store...I believe that running both an HID low AND high-beam without supplemental lighting is risky business.

My low-beam SilverStar burned out when I was heading to Seattle. I survived on my Motolights ALONE, part way. Then I realized that I could run my stock high-beam and adjust the light all the way down. This is the main reason I have finally decided that I am going to convert to an HID low-beam. I'll keep my stock high-beam for flashing cagers, and if I should ever need a backup low-beam.
 

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messenger13 said:
Say for instance all you do to a stock LT is the low-beam/high-beam HID conversion. Then you're on a trip and you lose your HID low beam, for whatever reason (the relay, the ballast, the bulb, etc.). You're pretty much S.O.L., IMO. Maybe I'm wrong here. You tell me. Until the bulbs and components are readily available at auto parts store...I believe that running both an HID low AND high-beam without supplemental lighting is risky business.
Definitely *not* SOL. On the road failures are no problem -- as part of the HID install, you just shove the low beam socket off to the side of the headlight housing. If the HID dies, pop the housing cover, remove the HID bulb, drop a stock halogen bulb, and plug it in.

IMO, reliability is less of an issue with the HID than a stock halogen; it's rare you ever hear of a failure which was not due to a poor installation (bad connection, relay installed where it can take in water, etc.). Reports of failures of the components themselves are *very* rare. Given the relative lives of the bulbs, you're far more likely to burn out a conventional incandescent bulb.

Besides, if you're *really* still concerned, before a long trip you can just toss the stock halogen into your bags before you leave (so you don't have to find an auto parts store that stocks an H7, which you'll have to do if the stock H7 dies).
 

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I do a buttload of night riding thanks to my job. I like Joe's approach with aux lights first. I have PIAA 1100XXs on brackets under the fairing (below and either side of the high beam). The PIAAs are awesome and do quite the job. I will next do an HID low beam, again for the same reason that Joe mentions - to keep high beam cage-flash capability and to fill in what little area the PIAAs don't light.
 

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On an 05 if the low beam goes, you can easily lower the aim of the high beam or swap back to a Halogen bulb.

In addition, HID's should last longer than the bike.

The HID is the ONLY thing that I have added to the bike that I would not give up. They are that good. Once again, do a side by side comparison, this will sell you.
 

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I didn't need "sold" on HID...just had reservations and/or other considerations. I am ready to move forward now. I'm just glad I have my Motolights still. Love the look, and I love the triangulation.
 

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I would love to see the look on your face the first time you ride with the HID low beam at night. May be hard to get your helmet off until the smile subsides. Kinda like riding an LT the first time. :D
 
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