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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone ever measure the torque on this nut after the final process of 60 Degrees after 50nm? Would be interesting to hear what it was, my angle meter may have slipped a few degrees and it could be useful information.

I don't think it moved enough for a re-try but I did accidentally order 2 clutch housing nuts. So should I sweat it?
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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You really don't need an angle meter as 60 degrees is one flat of the nut, but of course you need to mark it after the 50 Nm. Don't sweat it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah I should have marked just in case, it's a tight space doing this on the floor alone. Pretty darn close I'm sure, angle meter did not fall off of there or anything, the position just shifted slightly could not have moved more than 4-5 degrees if at all.

Doubt it could come flying off there over a few degrees as that nut stretches on there. I think 40-50 degrees over 50nm is pretty darn tight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Figured if I knew the final torque after 60 Degrees it would be easy to double check it.

I'm a bit of a perfectionist, gearbox is going together and back in tomorrow then hope to never see this again for at least 100k.
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Trouble with checking a torque value is you can only do it if the bolt or nut is moving, hitting the torque value without movement is meaningless. Your only takeaway is it is a least that but know way to know if it is more than that. Over torque is as bad as under torque.
 
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The nut is also single use with slits in it that compress during the tightening and the additional 60 degrees. I know some have reused that nut but they would have no idea what it was torqued to or if the 60 degrees on a used nut was tighter than designed as there is no crush factor. You might damage the shaft threads and that would be bad.
 

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Anyone ever measure the torque on this nut after the final process of 60 Degrees after 50nm? Would be interesting to hear what it was, my angle meter may have slipped a few degrees and it could be useful information.

I don't think it moved enough for a re-try but I did accidentally order 2 clutch housing nuts. So should I sweat it?
There is no way to accurately measure the torque on the nut as static friction is often 20% or so higher than dynamic friction so the “break out” torque value really isn’t a reliable indication of the original torque on the nut.

If you think you are within 10 degrees of the specified 60, I would not lose sleep over it as that is likely close to being in the normal range of variation of torque wrenches anyway. If you think you are off more than 10 degrees, I’d give strong consideration to removing the nut and installing a new one.
 
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