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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a warning today - broad daylight - from an Okla HP for running the Darla lights with the yellow lens covers mounted on the engine crash bars. He said it was illegal except during fog per the Feds. Been running them for a while & they work, especially in traffic. anyone help me out with this?
 

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I was just through OK with my Clearwater lights and yellow lens on one, and clear cover on the other. Guess they missed me. I use it for visibility in the daytime, and purposely one clear/one yellow. Never had an issue with LEO

Warning is better than a ticket
 

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Legal in Arizona. Check your state statues. Vary from state to state.

I carry Arizona's statute with me whenever I ride (see image).

Your officer claimed it was a federal regulation. Ask him, politely, if he could give you the CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) citation. If you get it, post it here. If he doesn't have it, it may not exist.
 

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Yup, from what I can tell they are also illegal in CA, but I see people with the all over the place. Even see people that have them setup to flash with their hazards. Just gives them a reason to pull you over I suppose, although it takes 2 seconds to make them white :D
 

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Legal in California. I also don't buy his Federal law deal either. Federal vehicle equipment law is meant for vehicle manufacturers. Aftermarket accessories etc are usually left up to the states to regulate.
 

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Legal in California. I also don't buy his Federal law deal either. Federal vehicle equipment law is meant for vehicle manufacturers. Aftermarket accessories etc are usually left up to the states to regulate.
The problem is that some states incorporate Federal regs into their own regulations, in effect saying that is it illegal to modify vehicles beyond what Federal law allows. For example, Massachusetts in 540 CMR 22.04 says:

The Federal Regulations, 49 CFR part 571.108, as enacted and from time to time amended, are
herein incorporated by reference as the regulations of the Registry of Motor Vehicles governing the
standards for the construction and performance of headlamps and other lighting equipment for the
purposes of complying with the provisions of M.G.L. c. 90.
And then in 22.07 they specifically prohibit you from adding your own lighting that doesn't comply:

22.07: Mounting and Display of other Aftermarket Lighting
No person shall mount or display any lighting device which does not comply with Federal Motor
Vehicle Safety Regulations, 49 CFR Part 571, unless specifically allowed by M.G.L. c. 90, §7. Such
prohibited devices shall include, but not be limited to, neon undercarriage lighting.
I'd bet most states are the same.

As far as I have checked, Massachusetts does not limit the number of lights allowed to be simultaneously illuminated, and specifically allows forward-facing lights to be amber. But I"m sure other states regulate them differently.

The whole reason the lighting aftermarket exists while being almost 100% "illegal" is the concept of "enforcement discretion." Lots of things are illegal. Local, state, and federal law enforcement has broad discretion to enforce or overlook certain things in order to prioritize their limited resources and maintain order. That's why police don't write a ticket for every single vehicle speeding on a highway. Most officers probably overlook the illegal lighting on motorcycles because there's just not that many of us and it's not really that annoying to most people. Sometimes though they decide to point out something they don't like. It's always been illegal - they just only notice it occasionally. It's a reasonable price to pay for increased conspicuity. I'd rather pay a ticket than a hospital or funeral bill.
 

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Got a warning today - broad daylight - from an Okla HP for running the Darla lights with the yellow lens covers mounted on the engine crash bars. He said it was illegal except during fog per the Feds. Been running them for a while & they work, especially in traffic. anyone help me out with this?
From what I can see it's an OK thing, not "federal." Specifically, Oklahoma Statutes Title 47: Motor Vehicles, §47-12-217. Auxiliary, fog, and off-road lamps. It says,

D. 1. A motor vehicle may be equipped with not to exceed two front fog lamps or two rear fog lamps which shall only be used when visibility, as described in paragraphs 3 and 4 of subsection A of this section, is limited to one-half (1/2) mile or less.
However, "driving" lights are permitted:

E. A motor vehicle may be equipped with not to exceed two auxiliary driving lamps mounted at a height of more than forty-two (42) inches from the ground. The auxiliary driving lamps may be used with lower beam headlamps or switch controlled in conjunction with the headlamps and may be used, at the discretion of the driver, with either low or high beam headlamps.
So my guess is that the officer considered low-mounted, yellow lights to be fog lamps, which can't be on during the day.

Good luck!
 

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Legal or not, who wants lights all over their bikes that attract police? My mission has always been to avoid them. Kind of a no brainer.:grin:
Lights make a huge difference in your visibility to cars, especially when splitting. My old bike had the Denali D4 LED pods mounted off set to the main headlight, so up high. My RT has the Clearwater Darla lights mounted down low on the forks. The difference between visibility is huge, people just don't see me when compared to my old bike. I've had more people pulling out on me in the past week than I have in the past year on my old bike. I want to get the mirror mounted lights, but since I already have Clearwater I'll have to go with the Krista.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
On the warning ticket it specifically states "Amber lamps used as auxiliary driving lamps."

I'm just curious - will probably call OKC tomorrow and find out what their reality is. Read some of the statues and they appear to say that amber lights are permitted. Maybe I'm wrong - we'll see.
 

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I run my 2.5” PIAA LEDs all the time. Mounted down low off engine guards and adjusted, so as not to be offensive. I installed yellow film over those lenses. Yellow provides better contrast on road, especially in wet/foggy weather. I also think the yellow is more noticeable to other drivers and is less offensive than white under similar conditions. I have yet to be stopped running the yellow lights in NC, VA, GA, TN, TX, AR and OK..
 

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Well, I have had no problem so far with running my Ericas with yellow covers. Cars really can see me. But if worse comes to worst, I will replace the yellow covers with clear covers and turn off the small BMW auxilliary lights.
 

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On the warning ticket it specifically states "Amber lamps used as auxiliary driving lamps."

I'm just curious - will probably call OKC tomorrow and find out what their reality is. Read some of the statues and they appear to say that amber lights are permitted. Maybe I'm wrong - we'll see.
Those clearwater lens covers don't look amber to me... They're more of a neon green.

I see LOE in cars and on bikes all the time in Southern California and have never had a problem related to my clearwater lights (Ericas with clear covers, Darlas with the tinted covers).
 

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Legal in California. I also don't buy his Federal law deal either. Federal vehicle equipment law is meant for vehicle manufacturers. Aftermarket accessories etc are usually left up to the states to regulate.
Actually illegal in CA after doing some digging.
ARTICLE 15. Light Restrictions and Mounting
25950.
This section applies to the color of lamps and to any reflector exhibiting or reflecting perceptible light of 0.05 candela or more per foot-candle of incident illumination. Unless provided otherwise, the color of lamps and reflectors upon a vehicle shall be as follows:
(a) The emitted light from all lamps and the reflected light from all reflectors, visible from in front of a vehicle, shall be white or yellow, except as follows:
The exceptions are basically defining rear color vs side coloring and emergency vehicles. Only thing that "might" be able to get away with is the "foglights":
(2) The color of foglamps described in Section 24403 may be in the color spectrum from white to yellow.

So technically if you had fork or maybe low mounted crash bar lights you could get away with the covers in California. But having the mirror mounts or the ones that mount below the headlights would be too high to be in regulation to "foglamps"..

Also interesting to note, in CA there are regulations as to the output of spot lamps.. They cannot exceed 32 standard candlepower or 30 watts. So that basically means anything over 402.24 lums is illegal on the street. So every aftermarket spot lamp lol
 

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It seems to me that vehicular "foglights" are by definition designed to be mounted low to the ground with a beam that's sharply cut horizontally, below the sightline of oncoming drivers. Any other "forward-facing" lights with a scattered/dazzling beam should be illegal except as highbeams and only at night.

Whether I'm riding or I'm driving a car it truly irritates me that some motorcyclists believe their daylight "conspicuity" justifies searing the eyeballs of all oncoming drivers and blasting rearview mirrors with blinding candlepower. That a few states' laws actually permit it is amazing to me.
 

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Simple go to a school at night, with a tape measure and a piece of chalk, and do this:

"5.1 - Suggested Aiming MethodStep One: With someone sitting on the bike and holding it upright on level ground, position the vehicle 25 feet from a flat and vertical wall. Be sure the wall is large enough that both beams can be projected onto the wall. A garage door is a great place to perform this procedure.Step Two: Measure the distance from the ground to the center of the light pods (H)Step Three: Using tape, make a horizontal line that is 2 inches lower than the previous measurement from the ground to the center of the lights (H-2”).Step Four: Loosen the mounting and hinge bolts then aim each light so that the center of the hot spot aligns with the tape line on the wall. The lights should be aimed equidistant left and right from center line of the vehicle. Step Five: Once final adjustments are made to the lights, tighten the mounting and hinge bolts.Congratulations! The DENALI LED Light Kit has been successfully installed! Enjoy! Refer to Figures 6 & 7 for detailed instructions for installing optional DENALI Light Kit accessories. To view a full list of accessories please visit WWW.DENALIELECTRONICS.COM"

What I did and I dont get blinked off :grin:
 

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Whether I'm riding or I'm driving a car it truly irritates me that some motorcyclists believe their daylight "conspicuity" justifies searing the eyeballs of all oncoming drivers and blasting rearview mirrors with blinding candlepower. That a few states' laws actually permit it is amazing to me.
Preach brutha!

Don't even get me started on those Gold Wingers (and others) and their headlight modulators. How some people have so little consideration for others just makes me crazy.
 

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Simple go to a school at night, with a tape measure and a piece of chalk, and do this:

"5.1 - Suggested Aiming MethodStep One: With someone sitting on the bike and holding it upright on level ground, position the vehicle 25 feet from a flat and vertical wall. Be sure the wall is large enough that both beams can be projected onto the wall. A garage door is a great place to perform this procedure.Step Two: Measure the distance from the ground to the center of the light pods (H)Step Three: Using tape, make a horizontal line that is 2 inches lower than the previous measurement from the ground to the center of the lights (H-2”).Step Four: Loosen the mounting and hinge bolts then aim each light so that the center of the hot spot aligns with the tape line on the wall. The lights should be aimed equidistant left and right from center line of the vehicle. Step Five: Once final adjustments are made to the lights, tighten the mounting and hinge bolts.Congratulations! The DENALI LED Light Kit has been successfully installed! Enjoy! Refer to Figures 6 & 7 for detailed instructions for installing optional DENALI Light Kit accessories. To view a full list of accessories please visit WWW.DENALIELECTRONICS.COM"

What I did and I dont get blinked off :grin:
100% agree.. I had the Denali D4's on my old bike, ran them all the time and never once had a person flash their high beams at me. You can have the lums without being a nuance to other drivers by blinding them. Now if I hit the high beams..... Well that is another story all together, holy cow those Denali D4's were bright!!!

As for the modulating headlights.... I mean, in CA they are 100% legal, some people hate them, other people love them. I personally only see a small hand full of people with those equipped every year, super rare to see.
 

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My friend and I run Clearwater Darla's with the yellow covers on them and no one has ever bothered us in Nevada or California. Any good LEO would want you to be highly visible as to avoid a car turning left in front of you or any other incident.
I would assume the OK. HP was bored and needed something to do. It happens all the time in smaller Nevada towns. They just want to look at your bike.
 
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