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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it me, or it is downright impossible to go fit a gauge or an air pump down there, unless you crawl on all four. And even then. I can't believe BMW had the flash of genius to put the valve dead in the middle of the rim. If you have a pump or a gauge that require a straight fit in, like the ones with a dial and a rubber hose, you're doomed. And of course, you either have the can on the left side, or the brake disc on the right to complicate things further.

Someone has a trick to share with me?

Thank you.
 

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I want to find the engineer responsible and cause things happen to him that will provide me with a lifetime of schadenfreude.

You know, the valve could have gone between the spokes instead of offset in the arch, where there would have been almost unlimited access to it.

I find it easier to do from the can side, as the disc makes it very hard to get any sort of chuck on. Hell, it's even hard to use a tire gauge to check the pressure from the right side. The problem is, doing it from the right side is natural for a right hander. The challenge becomes doing on your hands and knees as a left handed operation. Let's throw in some gravel to dig into your knees and maybe some desert temperatures so salty water will run into your eyes, blinding you so you can't see the gauge should you be so fortunate as to get the friggin' thing on there with your left hand. Of course, the reading will be meaningless because three psi escaped as you struggled to get the gauge to seal on the valve anyway....

Stupid bastiches.

I can regale you with stories about why my forefathers lost the war.

Tom
 

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12R12RT said:
I want to find the engineer responsible and cause things happen to him that will provide me with a lifetime of schadenfreude.

You know, the valve could have gone between the spokes instead of offset in the arch, where there would have been almost unlimited access to it.

I find it easier to do from the can side, as the disc makes it very hard to get any sort of chuck on. Hell, it's even hard to use a tire gauge to check the pressure from the right side. The problem is, doing it from the right side is natural for a right hander. The challenge becomes doing on your hands and knees as a left handed operation. Let's throw in some gravel to dig into your knees and maybe some desert temperatures so salty water will run into your eyes, blinding you so you can't see the gauge should you be so fortunate as to get the friggin' thing on there with your left hand. Of course, the reading will be meaningless because three psi escaped as you struggled to get the gauge to seal on the valve anyway....

Stupid bastiches.

I can regale you with stories about why my forefathers lost the war.

Tom

Nice rant!

I heard a rumor that the guy who designed the rear wheel tire valve was the same guy in charge of RT seat design. Someones son in law maybe?
 

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Hear what you are saying.....a painful/impossible task checking the rear wheel tyre pressure (if away from home, where the compressor is) . If only the engineer that designed the front wheel had met his co-worker designing the rear wheel :confused: .................bliss. :)

From the very deep south
Speedybrother
 

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jrhSeattle said:
Nice rant!

I heard a rumor that the guy who designed the rear wheel tire valve was the same guy in charge of RT seat design. Someones son in law maybe?
Naw - it was the one that designed the headlight bulb mount.

JayJay
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
AntRT said:
Here's how I do it, from the right side of the bike and a piece of cake:

$30 home Depot



About $20 most online stores.

If it works from the right side, are you're saying this angled gauge fits between the brake disc and the valve stem? That would be great. Thanks.
 

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Hammam said:
If it works from the right side, are you're saying this angled gauge fits between the brake disc and the valve stem? That would be great. Thanks.
Right side of the bike (rear brake pedal side) The gauge fits just fine between the disc and the stem. Not a ton of room but still easy to check pressure.
 

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JayJay said:
Naw - it was the one that designed the headlight bulb mount.

JayJay
Yeah, that's the guy.......has one really narrow hand with really long fingers and sticky pads on the ends of the fingers like a tree frog............tone deaf with a big rear end...............yeah, that guy! :histerica

Maybe he'll retire before they complete the design on the water cooled RT. We can hope.
 

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speedybrother said:
Hear what you are saying.....a painful/impossible task checking the rear wheel tyre pressure (if away from home, where the compressor is) . If only the engineer that designed the front wheel had met his co-worker designing the rear wheel :confused: .................bliss. :)

I might add to the post: most engineers will ALWAYS go the most effective, and correct method to sort out a problem like this. The problem is, the BEANCOUNTERS and design folks get hold of it and the simple, effective, way is gone. Everytime, trust me, I fight this battle myself. Of course, on your next tire change, get a right angle,metal, stem. Also much safer at speed--if you do speed--centrifugal force will have a lesser effect on the Schrader valve.
Who ever approved the stock seat should be forced to ride it out through an entire tank of gas; we could all get together and send him a set of custom made crutches!
 
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