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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all
I'm buying Used R1200RT in Aust
Advertised RRP Price range ~
$19000 2015 Dealer
$17000 2014 "
$15000 2014 "
$14000 2010 Private
All ridden less than 60,000kms, no real differences except one 2014 has BMW Sat Nav

Is the extra $5, for 5 year newer bike worth blowing the budget over ?

Other comments on model differences appreciated

I don't like GPS units myself, what's opinion of riders? Distraction or convenient?

I will be a long term owner, starting with day trips, occasional pillions, building to longer rides then Bucket list ride solo round Australia

(Ignoring differences between Private & Dealer sales)

Thx
 

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Hi all
I'm buying Used R1200RT in Aust
Advertised RRP Price range ~
$19000 2015 Dealer
$17000 2014 "
$15000 2014 "
$14000 2010 Private
All ridden less than 60,000kms, no real differences except one 2014 has BMW Sat Nav

Is the extra $5, for 5 year newer bike worth blowing the budget over ?

Other comments on model differences appreciated

I don't like GPS units myself, what's opinion of riders? Distraction or convenient?

I will be a long term owner, starting with day trips, occasional pillions, building to longer rides then Bucket list ride solo round Australia

(Ignoring differences between Private & Dealer sales)

Thx
I would go with the latest but $19K for 2015 is way out in the left field, my friend is selling his 2019 R1250RT, 719 option with 22K miles and asking $17.5 for it

Tony

Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk
 

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Is the extra $5, for 5 year newer bike worth blowing the budget over ?
Well, that depends on you and your circumstances. General advice is to get the newest bike you can afford. Considering the current range starts at $42 k, the '15 model doesn't seem that bad. The 2010 model is a different bike to the other 3, it's a cam-head while the others are the water cooled versions. I would discard the '10 unless it has very low mileage and see what the two '14 bikes need done.

Services are expensive, unless you do them yourself. That is one thing to check as regular service work (by owner or a dealer) makes a difference to the bike's longevity. These things can go to 2-300 k with no issues as long as the maintenance was kept up. If you plan to hang on to the bike for a few years at least.

What condition are the tyres? Likely they need replacing if not for ware, than age. Looking at $500 fitted for a pair at least.

Any of these bikes come with top box? The genuine BMW items cost in access of $2000. Any other extras? Like aftermarket seat and suspension? What about bling? The 719 option is the factory BMW shiny stuff, very expensive to buy.

These bikes are designed to do big miles. Unless you have photographic memory, stanav is a necessity. A factory satnav option used to be around $1500 all included so this definitely adds to the value.

If you need to discuss this stuff in person, I am happy for you to give me a ring, there is a lot to consider.

Good luck making the choice :)

$19K for 2015 is way out in the left field
The Australian used bike market has got out of hand. People are asking absolutely ridiculous amount for second hand bikes. Since I bought my '21 RT the prices gone up by 2 to 3 thousand over here.
 

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I paid 14k for my 2014 RT with 40k, 2 years ago. The only thing it didn't come with was the keyless ignition and the extra lights. The cams had just been replaced. I am very happy with it. Love the GPS, it is the nav5. Extra brake light in the top box. I do my own servicing. Easier than the 2002 R1150RT, I had.
 

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2018 R1200RT
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Hi all
I'm buying Used R1200RT in Aust
Advertised RRP Price range ~
$19000 2015 Dealer
$17000 2014 "
$15000 2014 "
$14000 2010 Private
All ridden less than 60,000kms, no real differences except one 2014 has BMW Sat Nav

Is the extra $5, for 5 year newer bike worth blowing the budget over ?

Other comments on model differences appreciated

I don't like GPS units myself, what's opinion of riders? Distraction or convenient?

I will be a long term owner, starting with day trips, occasional pillions, building to longer rides then Bucket list ride solo round Australia

(Ignoring differences between Private & Dealer sales)

Thx
I was looking, trying to figure out where you lived, when your fellow Aussie's answered that for me (as well as the context of your post). So, we're talking the Australian dollar, in the Aussie market. The reason I was wondering is because those numbers you cited, sting. I paid $15K (USD) last fall, and was probably mid-market on my purchase, i.e. there were some private party bikes in the $13K to $14K range, and I got a 49L top cased added into the deal, so technically I only paid $13,900 for mine with 11,500 miles (just had the 12K mile service - 20K to you, by the dealer). So, that's my frame of reference. Seems like you folks down under are getting stung pretty badly on prices; my regrets.

Now to specifics:

  1. They're all good bikes, both the Camheads (i.e. 2010 to 2013) to early Wetheads, and which one you chose depends on your budget, as much as anything.
  2. A 2010 bike is over 10 years old, and a 2014, at least eight years old. Back when vehicle costs and expenses were a bit "different", my rule of thumb was that rubber degraded or became unreliable within about four years. That meant that I'd routinely replace ignition components (including things like rotor and cap, plug wires) and hoses every four years, to maintain the "like new" reliability of the vehicle. With modern materials and technology, it's not quite that bad, but still, you're going to have to consider going through the bike and looking for aged parts that may need replacing, if you want to rely on the bike for more than a city commute vehicle. For example, the HES on my 2003 era R1150RT-P was notorious for degrading, and when I opened it up to inspect it, sure enough, all the wire insulation was crumbling and cracking, an unplanned roadside outage just waiting to happen, so I rebuilt the HES assembly using aircraft rated wire. That's an extreme example, just to explain, that when you buy an older bike, even a bike with BMW's engineering reputation, it really IS an OLDER bike. (You get what you pay for, as the saying goes). All that is assuming that you're at low mileage to begin with.
  3. Inevitably, new BMW models have quirks and sometimes, minor defects, that are fixed in newer models. For that reason, when I buy a used BMW (i.e. have never been one who could afford a new one), I try to buy the later if not latest year in the model run. In my case, I bought the last model year Wethead, a 2018, in part for that reason ("Premium" model, i.e. all the factory add-ons, so I wouldn't have to figure out what I wanted, or what I missed out on😁). If I were buying a Camhead, 2013 would be my natural "golden point", in lieu of any specific information to the contrary (e.g. the 2004 RT was a kludgy combination of technology between 2003 and the new 2005 Hexhead models). I avoided the 2014 model like the plague, for exactly that reason. BMW, in fact, had a buy-back program of 2014 for a while, to placate dissatisfied early Wethead owners, and I found one or two of those during my search last year, which were, in fact, direct BMW buybacks that had been sitting in a BMW warehouse for 3 to 4 years. Most likely, all the recalls and fixes were in place (you can research the early 2014 bugs on your own), and any 2014 you're looking at is fine, but still ... not for my money.
  4. The 2017-2018 Wetheads had a notable transmission upgrade, over the older Wetheads. BMW's transmissions have always had their "tractor" reputations, so any improvement to their transmission was a positive reason for me to shop the 2017-2018. Plus, prices in the US on 2017's (2018's for resale were more difficult to find last fall, 2019+ R1250RT's were non-existent!) were not much higher than 2015-2016's.
  5. Regarding the NAV6. MOST if not all USA delivered Wetheads had Nav prep included, so I'm assuming by "navigation" your talking about the actual NAV6 unit is included, not the Nav prep. (BTW, there's a forum member on bmwrt.com who's advertising a NAV6 for $450 USD, a screaming deal if it's still available and he'll ship to AU.) So, first, many BMW riders are unhappy about the NAV6, so do your research, and buyer beware. Second, "many of us" (how many? who's "us"?🙄) have instead adopted the ZUMO XT plus some method of installing it into the NAV6 cradle (my preferred is an Italian company's bracket called "E-nav XT", which enables my ZUMO to install just like the NAV6, with only BMW's wonderwheel functionality missing, which I wouldn't use anyhow). So, don't pay too much extra for the NAV6. I wouldn't be on a bike without one (but the USA is not OZ), but I wouldn't pay BMW's premium for buggy GPS technology, and there are less expensive alternatives (i.e. Zumo XT was $400 USD on sale last year, and the E-Nav bracket, about $80 USD delivered).
  6. Your local Australian market. If those options are all the bikes that are realistically (and affordably) available to you, then pick the one you can afford, and go have some fun. In the USA, I have no problem flying into another state, buying a bike, and riding it home, if the bike and the deal are right. I'm not sure how that compares to OZ. I'm in Northern Idaho, and BMW dealers are fewer and further between. (In fact, I recently discovered that there's a BMW dealer just 30 minutes away that I had no idea about Even then, one local BMW dealer may have ONE used RT in stock, and it can be higher mileage, high priced, the wrong year, wrong color, etc. Buying within a USA nationwide market gives me a better chance to find and buy what I want.)
Good luck with your search, and most of all, RIDE SAFE (ATGATT - all the gear all the time) and put some miles (or Kilometers) on that thing! 🍻👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
WOW !!!
All great advice
Exactly what I was hoping for.. Very informative & sharing forum
Thanks to all for your thoughts

I will be buying in late June. End-of-financial-year in Aust is June 30th, so hoping dealers will be super keen to sell one more bike & offer a great deal ??

Scott9999 Yes Aussies get ripped off on everything from imported white goods, CD/DVDs, Netflix, Apple downloads, even mobile phones & plans cost more Downunder & that's before AUST to USA $ conversion makes imports cost more or tech companies dumping old, obsolete models that o/s markets would not accept

Hati Great advice again, thnx
BTW I am a Cartographer, have previously worked editing SatNav datasets, happen to have a photographic memory for maps, plus I don't like being restricted to using proprietary systems. Open source & Freeware is the way to go. SatNav is more an obstacle to negotiating a cheap deal than a desired feature for me but my situation is unique

Thanx again all
 

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happen to have a photographic memory for maps
Now you made me turn green :D Seriously though, if the nav pack is not a consideration, that much the better. I personally missed the early water cooled bikes, I had an oil-head (2003) and a hex-head (2006) and went straight to the current model RT. Listen to Scott9999 for those years, good advice there.

Ah yeah, make sure all the recalls were done on the bike, dealers can check on that based on the bike's VIN.
 

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Hmm. Looking at the conversion rates - $19,000 Aus to US = $13,175 US for the 15.

I bought my loaded 15 with 27,194 miles from a dealership in Alb, NM in June of 2019 for $11,856 cash with a year warranty coverage. The dealership was asking $12,995.

I don't know how bike pricing in Aus runs these days but that sure seems high to me.

That said, I'd suggest the '15. Mine's been flawless.

Wheel Tire Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive lighting
 

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Steve, we just don't have the volume of choice that the US has. I'm sure most OEMs know the prices that Aussie's are use to paying, consequently prices for imports are adjusted accordingly for maximum profit. Second hand bikes then just follow that trend.
That said, you can get a good deal occasionally if you shop around and have time on your side..

Agree with you about the 15. After spending many hours studying at the Boxflyer Technical Maintenance School (BTMS) and completing multiple servicings and checks, my 15 has also been flawless. I love the Keyless ride.
 

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I purchased my ‘15 from my local dealer in 2017 with 9K miles for $12,500. It was a super deal at the time and still like new today. I hated to see my first BMW (2004 K1200RS) go but I’ve been smiling ever since. I did a lot of research at the time on used market availability and the ‘15 checked all of the boxes. I’d go for the ‘15.

Paul
 

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I purchased my ‘15 from my local dealer in 2017 with 9K miles for $12,500. It was a super deal at the time and still like new today. I hated to see my first BMW (2004 K1200RS) go but I’ve been smiling ever since. I did a lot of research at the time on used market availability and the ‘15 checked all of the boxes. I’d go for the ‘15.

Paul
Wow, I can't tell from your profile where you live, but at $12.5K for a 2-year old, near-new BMW RT, that's still a heck of a deal. You'd probably make money on that bike if you sold it today. Good on ya, and your dealer. 👍🍻
 

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I live in Virginia, near the coast. It was such a great deal - saw it on a Friday afternoon at closing - went home and stayed up late doing research - and was there when they opened the next morning. Took it out for a test ride and that was it - SOLD! My dealer even had a used NAV 5 he let me have for $300. Needless to say I was the happiest BMW owner that day. It even had 3 months of the factory warranty left - which was a great assurance for me buying a used bike. Soon I realized it had a faulty shift assist - which was replaced under warranty - and after being out in the rain soon after - developed some moisture in the display - also replaced under warranty. She’s been wonderful in every aspect ever since.

Paul
 

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I live in Virginia, near the coast. It was such a great deal - saw it on a Friday afternoon at closing - went home and stayed up late doing research - and was there when they opened the next morning. Took it out for a test ride and that was it - SOLD! My dealer even had a used NAV 5 he let me have for $300. Needless to say I was the happiest BMW owner that day. It even had 3 months of the factory warranty left - which was a great assurance for me buying a used bike. Soon I realized it had a faulty shift assist - which was replaced under warranty - and after being out in the rain soon after - developed some moisture in the display - also replaced under warranty. She’s been wonderful in every aspect ever since.

Paul
How could you tell the shift assist was faulty? Not working at all, or bad shifts?
 

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At first I thought it was working but I realized I had to ease the throttle to get it to shift. I had read that you were supposed to keep the throttle on the whole time. When I asked the dealer about it they said that was true and that I had been manually doing what the shift assist does to the throttle through the electronics. Once it was replaced, it was an immediate realization of how well it works and what a nice feature it is. I’m just glad I was paying attention and had searched online about how it was supposed to function. I use it all the time now above 2nd gear - especially when in the mountains on those gloriously curvy roads.

Paul
 

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For those that don't understand how Shift Assist Pro works [from the manual]

Your motorcycle is equipped with a gear-shift assistance function originally developed for racing but now specially adapted for touring use. It allows you upshift and downshift under almost any load conditions and in virtually all engine-speed ranges without operating the clutch or accelerator.

Benefits

70-80 % of all gear changes can be performed without using the clutch. Less movement between pilot and pillion due to shorter gear change intervals. Throttle does not have to be closed when changing gear under acceleration. During deceleration and downshifts (throttle plate closed) the system blips the throttle to obtain
the correct engine speed. Shifting times are faster than when the clutch is used to change gears. For the system to detect the rider's intention to change gear, the previously stationary gear lever must be moved in the desired direction against the force of the spring and with a certain amount of "over-travel" at a standard to rapid travel speed, and then maintained in this position until execution of the shift is completed. No additional increase in shifting force is necessary during the gear shifting process. After the gear change is completed, the gear lever must be fully released before the Gear Shift Assistant Pro can execute a new gear change. The load factor (throttle grip position) should remain constant both prior to and during execution of shifts using the Gear Shift Assistant. Changing the position of the throttle grip while the shift is in progress can lead to cancellation of the function and/or shifting errors. No support is provided by the Gear Shift Assistant during gear changes made using the clutch.
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Clutch - we don' need no stinkin' clutch....:)
 

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Shift Assist Pro (SAP) re-learn procedure if required.

Make sure your motorcycle engine and ignition is off for more than 20 seconds.
Start the engine and after 20 seconds apply the brake
Clutch and shift into first gear and ride for 10 seconds
Upshift to second gear without using clutch and ride for 10 seconds
Repeat above steps for gears 3-6
At the end, clutch and downshift to neutral.

Shut the engine down and turn off the ignition. Wait for the CANBUS to sleep (120 Sec), now your SAP has re-learned
 
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