BMW Luxury Touring Community banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My problem is getting my bike into Uruguay. I'm moving there as a resident. I'm told I can't bring in a vehicle for about 18 months but can buy one there. Cost of my LT down there is prohibitive. Does anybody know how I can bring in my bike short of 18 months without paying an enormous duty penalty? :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,285 Posts
judgebill said:
My problem is getting my bike into Uruguay. I'm moving there as a resident. I'm told I can't bring in a vehicle for about 18 months but can buy one there. Cost of my LT down there is prohibitive. Does anybody know how I can bring in my bike short of 18 months without paying an enormous duty penalty? :confused:
Maybe a long shot - but how about if you were to start a "business" there servicing LT's - exclusively - or how about a motorcycle touring company?

My wife and I are going to take a look at Argentina in a few months with thoughts of moving there. Uruguay is also on the short list.

A few South American countries will allow you to bring in a vehicle every two years duty free - Panama is one of them. They have very attractive tax deferred benefits for start up businesses too - up to 20 years. :eek: Perhaps Uruguay has such a pensionado set up - or maybe a group like Business Panama that you can get in touch with?

BusinessPanama Group: About Us

Some of the tourism incentives are absolutely incredible in Panama - land of the FREE!:

Tax Incentives for Projects in Special Tourism Zones
  • 100% Income tax exemption for a period of 15 years
  • 100% Property taxes exemption including land
  • 100% Exemption from Import taxes including the Sales tax (5%) for 20 years
  • 100% Income Tax Exemption originated by the interests charged by creditors
    in the tourism activity investment for 20 years
  • 100% Exemption from liens due to the use of docks or airports built by the company
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
Ride it down to Uruguay, sneak it across the border, buy a shitty little scooter, take the license plate off and stick it on the LT.....He he he he......I mean if you were a judge Bill, you must have heard of all the sneaky things people do to get around the law. Hey, maybe you can license it in another country nearby that is easier to import it to. Or maybe you can bring it in as a tourist temporary permit, and just forgetaboutit, and stay. Isn't Uruguay a little beach town anyway? It must be loaded with tourists from all over SA, who would notice one more out of town license plate? (No I've never even spent 1 night in jail in my life!) :lol8:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ron K; Argentina is nice but Buenos Aires is too big (10M people) compared to the entire country of Uruguay (3M in the entire country). And can travel easily from U to Brazil and Argentina. Don't know anything about Panama but have heard it's very nice. Your idea of starting a m/c repair shop isn't bad except I really don't know that much about mechanics, and I really want to retire. Somebody's idea of switching license plates might work but only for a while. And the bike I want to take is the GS-A, not my LT (leaving the LT in Los Angeles for visits). :dance:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,285 Posts
judgebill said:
Ron K; Argentina is nice but Buenos Aires is too big (10M people) compared to the entire country of Uruguay (3M in the entire country). And can travel easily from U to Brazil and Argentina. Don't know anything about Panama but have heard it's very nice. Your idea of starting a m/c repair shop isn't bad except I really don't know that much about mechanics, and I really want to retire. Somebody's idea of switching license plates might work but only for a while. And the bike I want to take is the GS-A, not my LT (leaving the LT in Los Angeles for visits). :dance:
Yeah, that's why I was thinking the "adventure motorcycle tour business" might work. Not only would it be plausible with the GSA, but it may also fit into the tourism angle - which most governments are happy to assist - and especially Uruguay since its a major part of their economy.

Maybe you could get appointed as an agent (for a small fee - hey, that's how business is done in most of the world) from one of the guys running a business in Argentina, there are several. For me, that would be a fun thing to do in retirement - run a tour several times a month!

I'm looking at the north part of Argentina near the Andes - a looonngg way from Buenos Aires! (about 800 miles) La Estancia de Cafayate - Salta - Argentina
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top