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Discussion Starter #1
http://www.flurl.com/uploaded/motorcycle_accident_859.html

Looks to me like an inexperienced rider on unfamiliar / brand new bike, possibly nervous and maybe conscious of camera. Very unlucky. The consequences were much worse than he deserved but just goes to show you don't need to be hammering it to get hurt!
 

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Don't know what caused the rear end to jerk like that (rock?,oil spot?, whatever) but it looks like he was not willing to let the bike recover (hence the foot down) by itself and then the wall shows up in his perception and target fixation takes over from there
 

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I think what he did, was down-shift a second time...Hence the rear wheel locking up. Maybe a brain fart cuz of the camera. Then, his inexperience is pretty apparent as he just kinda freezes up, maybe applies the front brake (bad in a curve) and puts a foot down. All bad stuff!
I can tell you one thing...He's lucky he landed where he did, because that looks like a bridge with a big drop on the other side of that wall!!
 

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Pretty hard to tell, but it appears that he was covering the clutch. So I think he down shifted, with the clutch pulled in, he drifted the bike, the rpm's dropped and he popped the clutch. This would lock up the rear tire for a second.

Classic mistakes after that. Regardless of how good you THINK you are, when things go wrong, you will go into survival mode.

For this guy he put his feet down, then went straight. He was not going fast, the turn was slight, the bike could easily be countersteered to make the turn and avoid the stone bridge. Human nature will make even the best rider go straight, or worse yet, turn the bike like a car.

The correct approach would be keep both feet on the pegs, roll on the gas to transfer weight to the rear tire to increase traction and COUNTER STEER. This is much easier said than done. Most would not or could not do this.

A slipper clutch could have saved his arse on this one. Very lucky he did not go over the bridge.
 

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rickcavanaugh said:
Pretty hard to tell, but it appears that he was covering the clutch. So I think he down shifted, with the clutch pulled in, he drifted the bike, the rpm's dropped and he popped the clutch. This would lock up the rear tire for a second.

Classic mistakes after that. Regardless of how good you THINK you are, when things go wrong, you will go into survival mode.

For this guy he put his feet down, then went straight. He was not going fast, the turn was slight, the bike could easily be countersteered to make the turn and avoid the stone bridge. Human nature will make even the best rider go straight, or worse yet, turn the bike like a car.

The correct approach would be keep both feet on the pegs, roll on the gas to transfer weight to the rear tire to increase traction and COUNTER STEER. This is much easier said than done. Most would not or could not do this.

A slipper clutch could have saved his arse on this one. Very lucky he did not go over the bridge.


You say most would not or could not do this but that is untrue in my opinion. Particularly at the speed he was going. He was obviously an inexperienced rider. The skills you mentioned should be second nature to anyone that has taken the time to learn how to correctly ride a motorcycle.
Anything less could be considered irresponsible. My perception of most members here indicates that probably a pretty high percentage can accomplish these tasks fairly easily. Practice, practice, practice!
'Course, you could have been referring to most "new" riders, I guess.
 

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Good posting Macker,

Hitting that wall could have been easily avoided.


I would suggest to anyone who would like to improve their skills on the street to read Keith Code's book, "A twist of the wrist"
 

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Actually when I say most, I include myself. I have been riding bikes since 1978. I raced bikes AAMRR #35 and WERA #135 when I was a wee young stupid child.

I have done Keith Codes Level #1 & 2 about a year ago.

I have wrecked bikes in speeds in excess of 100 mph....several times. (we used to call wrecking "doing the break dance" for you older folks who remember break dancing).

I feel that I have the skills. When I was 17 to 19 I did not own a car, only a bike. I used to ride the bike in the Maryland Year round. I even rode it in the snow.

When stuff goes wrong it is amazing how fast you will revert to survival mode (from Keith Code).

Never ever think you are too good to learn more.

I did somethinge equally as stupid as this guy did about 2 years ago. (but I did not do it into a wall or in front of a camera) I wrecked a bike at very low speed because I was in survival mode and did not do what my training told me to do. I remember every second of the wreck (about 5 mph). The bike I was on could do the turn at 75 mph but I wrecked it at 5. Did I feel stupid, yes, but I admit that 99 % of my life time miles are in a car, I reverted to car mode in a survival panic, even though my life was not in danger.

I have a very low threshold of fear. I have over 1500 skydives. I have raced bikes, I have bungee jumped etc....but the mind takes over.
 

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grifscoots said:
So, those of us who have ridden more than we drive, survival mode would drop into motorcycle survival mode?
Reading my mind again, eh there Grif? :)

In the last 24 months, I have put on 4 times the miles on bikes as I have my cages. And I only see this changing for the better. Each year, I intend to ride my bikes more and more, and my cages less. I'll call it, "Survival Mode Training". Yea...that's the ticket! :D
 

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ANY excuse for ride, right? LOL ! And increased proficiency to boot also!!
 
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