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Having worked for Michelin on the customer side, MOST problems are caused by customer use. They cannot say that, but that delamination comment from NMDan is probably right. It is possible that the butyl lining was not attached properly, but the most likely option is that it has separated from the tyre because it was run at low pressure, overloaded (samething) or overheated.

Guessing from the photo.
Delamination. The cause usually is at some point in it's life it was run low on pressure, overloaded or overheated.
It is delamination, but you guys should note that this is on the inner most layer! Besides, have you heard of this happening with the other brands?

As for manufacturing, let me describe the general process for you! It starts with forming a tall cylinders of "green" rubber layers. Each layer have the composition that is designed for that depth of the tire thickness, such as cords, steel belting, or pure rubber for the thread. Each layer has a solution of catalyst/adhesive applied. This is where thing went wrong to cause delamination! If the coating of the catalyst/adhesive being applied is spotty, or insufficient, then you will not get good adhesion in between layers after molding!!!

When the, very hot, mold closes, it bulges the center of the cylinder into the outer most part of the mold, and high pressure is applied inside the green rubber cylinder to force the rubber layers very hard against the inside surfaces of the mold and held until the rubber have melted into the outer profiles of the mold geometry and fully cure. From distance memory, that takes at least 15 minutes, or 1/2 hour. Back when I was working at Firestone, in my youth (part of requirement to get an engineering degree in NZ), they used high pressure steam to both heat the mold and pressurize and heat the inside of the "green" rubber tube. They were in the process of converting to electric heating of the mold, for better control the temperature profile at the time, and that's how it's probably done nowadays.
 

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Over the last 50 years I have primarily used Yokohama, Pirelli, Michelin, Metzeler, Dunlop, Continental, and Bridgestone tires... generally swapping out tires twice a year. I have not had any issues with any of the tires brands I have used.
Most of my life has been riding sports bikes and those tires would last maybe 5k miles.
Now, that I am older and switched to a Harley and BMW and slowing down a lot... I find I get closer to 8.5k to 10k on a pair of tires.
Probably the biggest consideration for me is to always check tire pressure before a ride... even when riding every day.
And, I check our vehicle tires probably way too much, but hey... I am re-tired.
 

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What I've seen owning a auto repair and tire shop for decades is when it is in the inside, (not a tread separation) the the tire was usually overloaded or run at low pressure. If you look at his pic, it is right where the tire would be flexing if run low. I've seen it on many car tires of various brands over the years.

Continental was one of the tire brands we sold and I don't recall any warranty issues ever. Almost universally, when we saw a car tire of any brand with an issue, it could be traced back to an injury or evidence of running low on pressure and sometimes damage from the installer. Of course, there were famous tires in a line that had issues like the Firestone 500 among others when radials first hit the street back in 70s but those instances were generally a specific tire model more so than a particular brand.

I currently have Contis on my wifes car and had them on my last truck. They have always been a brand I was confident with and sold many sets based on that confidence. On bikes, I had at least 2 pairs of them on my 04 RT (road attack), 3 pairs on my 11 GS (trail attack) and one pair on my Aprilia (sport attack) - As stated above, no issues.
 

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Over the last 50 years I have primarily used Yokohama, Pirelli, Michelin, Metzeler, Dunlop, Continental, and Bridgestone tires... generally swapping out tires twice a year. I have not had any issues with any of the tires brands I have used.
Most of my life has been riding sports bikes and those tires would last maybe 5k miles.
Now, that I am older and switched to a Harley and BMW and slowing down a lot... I find I get closer to 8.5k to 10k on a pair of tires.
Probably the biggest consideration for me is to always check tire pressure before a ride... even when riding every day.
And, I check our vehicle tires probably way too much, but hey... I am re-tired.
I don't doubt it at all! Not having good QA and process control in place doesn't mean that every tires will be bad, but it does mean that the probability of getting a bad tire is always present. That's not the main reason why I wouldn't even try the brand, but the fact that they wouldn't even stand behind the quality of their tire is what turned me totally off!

Do a search in this forum and you will find several threads on the brand, and one in particular where the rider had tried to get the company to acknowledge the problem, without any success.
 
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It should be recognized that for any issues to occur with the tire, the defect has to be present, to some degree, first. IF the tire was manufactured correctly, all of the layers would have meld together completely to form a unify single homogeneous structure. If insufficient, or spotty application of the adhesive/catalyst is applied in between the layers, as I had described, then the boundary of the layer would not blend properly, causing the internal delamination. This applies to any of the multiple layers that makes up the tire! Back in the '70s Firestone had some very serious issues with delamination of the tread, or the top-most layer, in their Firestone 500 that I had on my Mustang at the time. At least Firestone stood behind the problem and had a big general recall on those tires.
 
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PadG,
Agreed with you comment, but would add that it looks like the butyl lining, the balloon inside a porous rubber, has come away. This does not bond in the same way as other rubber does. Its just glued, and that is why is separates so easily. That is different from the tread coming off (Think Truck retreads on the side of the road back in the 1990s)
 

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PadG,
Agreed with you comment, but would add that it looks like the butyl lining, the balloon inside a porous rubber, has come away. This does not bond in the same way as other rubber does. Its just glued, and that is why is separates so easily. That is different from the tread coming off (Think Truck retreads on the side of the road back in the 1990s)
You might be correct, but the issue is still improper bonding that should have been correctly done as part of the process from the factory!
 

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As you can see, I have been on this forum for a few years, and the only tire brands that I have ever seen complaints against had been just Continental. Now, let's be very clear . . . . I am NOT telling you to stay away from the brand. It's your money, your bike, and YOU need to make the final decision! I am simply sharing my personal knowledge, experiences, and historical data for you guys to be able to make intelligent decisions for yourself.

I had mentioned about past issues with Conti, and that you should be able to see them for yourself if you were to do a search in this forum. Here are some fairly reason ones that will show up, amongst many results:

 
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If you aren't happy with the Michelins (I don't really like them - I think they're over hyped, over rated, and over priced) try Dunlop RoadSmart IV or Continental RoadAttack III. I've had great results with multiple sets of both. Next I'm going to try Continental RoadAttack IV and see how those work.
Friends with GSs love the grip of the Trail Attack, and the tires last a long time too. Talking with them, I wondered if I should get the Trail Attack for my RT. One said that he was doing mostly road riding lately and was actually contemplating getting a set of Road Attack 3s for his GS. He heard good things about their grip and longevity. So I'm tempted to try them. I've been on Pilot Roads since generation 3 and I absolutely love them... except that I rarely get much more than 5000 miles out of a set. I plan on doing more road trips now that I have the RT, and I really don't want to buy tires twice a year.
 

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Delamination. The cause usually is at some point in it's life it was run low on pressure, overloaded or overheated.
I've been riding since the early 70s and I'm pretty OCD about tire pressure so it's not that. I ride solo on my RT (two-up on my Ultra) and have never been overloaded. Now, overheated, well, I'm in South Texas and ride West Texas (Big Bend area) NM, AZ, etc. and summer riding all day in over 100+ degrees is common. The problem is that I've done that for years and this is the only time I've had this issue.
 

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I've been riding since the early 70s and I'm pretty OCD about tire pressure so it's not that. I ride solo on my RT (two-up on my Ultra) and have never been overloaded. Now, overheated, well, I'm in South Texas and ride West Texas (Big Bend area) NM, AZ, etc. and summer riding all day in over 100+ degrees is common. The problem is that I've done that for years and this is the only time I've had this issue.
Interesting.... The next step is to pull the tyre apart, and see why its separated, but I think I will stop there :)
 

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I've been riding since the early 70s and I'm pretty OCD about tire pressure so it's not that. I ride solo on my RT (two-up on my Ultra) and have never been overloaded. Now, overheated, well, I'm in South Texas and ride West Texas (Big Bend area) NM, AZ, etc. and summer riding all day in over 100+ degrees is common. The problem is that I've done that for years and this is the only time I've had this issue.
Very much what I had figured! There are just too many WAG being offered here without real facts or actual knowledge!

If you are not technical, and there doesn't seem t be anyone here who is, then look at the history!
 
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I call things as they are, and I tend to get quite irritated when a rider post an issue and gets blamed with WAGs! If you are in sales, the thing that you could have done to help the guy is to advise him as to how to make an effective complaint to the factory, instead of blaming him for the issue! It's bad enough that he will most likely (based on what had happened in the past) get the same BS back from the company anyway!

As for using adhesive in retread/recap tires - that has absolutely no bearings on the manufacturing of new tires! If you don't understand why adhesive has to be used in those instances, then you don't know anything about thermoset materials, of which rubber, both natural and synthetic, belongs. Ergo, WAG! Probably doesn't hurt, but certainly no help to the guy!!!
 

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I was trying to help. I was not trying to blame. Rapz explained his situation more fully. I don't think he flew off the handle, and hopefully was not offended.
I am certainly mildly offended by your approach.

Sorry you missed the pun and the wink.

Actually bonding of retreads does has a bearing, but i will not try to explain it to you.
 
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