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I run Mich. Just put a set of GT6's on. Even brand new, in driving rain on greasy roads, their grip impressed me. (Straight after fitting at the shop)

Confession. 25 years ago I worked for Michelin in the UK. Part of that was selling truck tyres to fleets. We sold them on a cost per mile basis. My father in law worked for Pirelli, so I had a slight inside into the workings of that manufacturer.

Boring Ramble: At the time, Michelin had the edge on how they made tyres with a conformity, so all tyres they made worked the same. Often when examining miles completed on truck fleets, I would get a outlier made by a competing brand that would do we well or even better, but over several sets, we always came out significantly cheaper per mile.

Now that was a long time ago, and others I am sure have raised their game but they still do well I think.

But with a bike tyre, surely the most important part is grip. My bike tyre has many different conditions thrown at it, road surface, moisture, temp to name the obvious ones, and I want to know it will stop me as fast is is possible in a variety of conditions.

My tyre is the only contact with the road, so I am happy to compromise on other things, but never the tyre grip.


Think hard when you might compromise for a few miles of perceived long levity on an expensive, and heavy bike. The GT6 claims 15% longevity over the GT5... we will see.

Also, if you ever ride in the wet, think about the depth of the tread. The gap is there to move the water away from under the tyre so you do not aquaplane. So I take mine of a bit before they reach the legal limit.

{added}
Cupping at the front can be pressures from memory, but can also be riding style (breaking hardish into corners, easy with a heavy bike). I guess the high inflation on the front might help with that, but would love to hear it from a tyre expert. (just looked back up the thread, As tvguy says)
I have not suffered noise Dave either.
 

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Having worked for Michelin on the customer side, MOST problems are caused by customer use. They cannot say that, but that delamination comment from NMDan is probably right. It is possible that the butyl lining was not attached properly, but the most likely option is that it has separated from the tyre because it was run at low pressure, overloaded (samething) or overheated.

Guessing from the photo.
 

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PadG,
Agreed with you comment, but would add that it looks like the butyl lining, the balloon inside a porous rubber, has come away. This does not bond in the same way as other rubber does. Its just glued, and that is why is separates so easily. That is different from the tread coming off (Think Truck retreads on the side of the road back in the 1990s)
 

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I've been riding since the early 70s and I'm pretty OCD about tire pressure so it's not that. I ride solo on my RT (two-up on my Ultra) and have never been overloaded. Now, overheated, well, I'm in South Texas and ride West Texas (Big Bend area) NM, AZ, etc. and summer riding all day in over 100+ degrees is common. The problem is that I've done that for years and this is the only time I've had this issue.
Interesting.... The next step is to pull the tyre apart, and see why its separated, but I think I will stop there :)
 

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I was trying to help. I was not trying to blame. Rapz explained his situation more fully. I don't think he flew off the handle, and hopefully was not offended.
I am certainly mildly offended by your approach.

Sorry you missed the pun and the wink.

Actually bonding of retreads does has a bearing, but i will not try to explain it to you.
 
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