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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

I may be stupid but here's my situation :eek: :

I first ride an 125cc Honda Shadow, then a 1100 Honda Shadow Aero, a BMW 1100RT and now the K12LT since last december

I don't have car license and drive motorcycles daily for about 8 years now, but after 60k+ miles, I'm always pissed off with BACK problems. Not really Back problems indeed it's more like if I can't find the ideal position to place my body on the bike... :( It happens on every bike I used to drove.

I tried several methods : Resting my back by putting a little more pressure on the feet, Riding with my back as straight as it can be, Riding with my chest slighty tilt forward with arm resting my chest... Aside of riding with back real straight, nothing's really helpfull.

Does anybody feels like this ? :confused:
 

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Yep. I've found that a backrest helps. You also might want to try a sheepskin cover or an AirHawk. Or, a custom seat.

But, to me, the most comfortable position is slightly leaned over, which is hard to do on an LT. What I've found with my other bike (which is the more leaned over position) is that I actually have MORE seating position options. I can lean forward for a while, then sit back in a more upright position, sit kinda of sideways with one knee kicked out drawing air into my body. Just can't seem to do that on the LT.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
dwsdad said:
I've found that a backrest helps.
I had one on my Aero and it seems I'm pretty much a "must not have" guy. I've found that it gets my back more and more lazy...
 

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I ride straight up 95%+ of the time, so do virtually all motorcops that last more than a year.
Any other way your back takes a beating, if your back is already beat from other things then items like backrest may help.
Think of it in terms of mechanics, your backbone and muscles either have an advantage or disadvantage. Structurally the bones will support you over a longer time with less fatique, than the muscles. However the stabilizer muscles need to be trained to hold you in that position.
Rock
 

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I ride straight up, have to, had 4 discs fused. I found out that a 'double' gel pad helps relieve a little stress on the back (butt busters). I do not use a back rest.
~Huggs~
 

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I find the forward lean position the most comfortable and easiest on the back for the 12 hour day trips. The only way I can replicate that position on the LT is use the passenger pegs. That gives me the right tilt to take the pressure off the small of my back and help keep my spine aligned. Unfortunately, that isn't the safest position since I have to move my feet to get to controls, but on long stretches where I'm not fighting through traffic, it doesn't seem like that big of risk.
 

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Gotta go with Uncle Rock on this one. After working motors for years this is the only position that will protect your back and support your weight. I use a backrest when I throw my legs out to the J-pegs but that is just for a change of position on the highway during a long run. In town though it is straight up.
 

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Back tenderness

Greetings Frenchy.

I found something similar to what you're describing when I purchased my LT after riding my faithful old "83 K100. The old K100 riding position puts a lovely slight curve in your spine, much better at absorbing bumps than the much upright spine position the LT tends to put you in. Both my wife and I noticed this when we first leapt onto the LT. I find myself now when I ride the LT, I tend to change and wriggle around in the saddle quite a bit and eventually tend to attempt to ride with a slight curve in my back to assist in bump absorbtion.
Put some miles on your LT and try a few positions and you'll get your head or rather your back into it. What Tarheel wrote above is good advice too.

Time will tell, see how you go. Perhaps a kidney belt my be of some help to you.

Kindest regards
Paul Harrington
Australia
[email protected]
 

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I've rode on the back seat leaning forward feet on back pegs. On the back seat not leaning over back against the back rest hands folded (not sugested). Front seat feet on jpegs, feet on back pegs, feet just dangling (also not sugested). But mostly I sit up. Sometimes I lean forward and rest my wrists on the grips. When I put on Illium foot boards and set the seat in the up postion I thought this feels right. The Illium foot boards sit lower and more forward. However they tend to drag in corners if you get a little aggresive.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Guys for the answers :)

I'll look to the Backrest and/or lowered footpeg solution I guess (I'm 1,75m tall - that's 5.7" I guess)

I'll be trying to straight up that damn back a little + I'll seek some body training too to muscle it.

Straight up back improves rideability for sure and it improves shocks absorption too, but for now, it still hurts a little. Things will be better for sure...

Thanks
 
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Highly recommend using a Back-A-Line support belt

I have used a BAL support belt for about 4 years and have had no lower back pain when riding since using it. I bought it from CycleGadgets.com for about $40. It's a good cheap solution, but I still lust for a custom seat and Highway Ottomans.:)
 

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tarheel_rider said:
Unfortunately, that isn't the safest position since I have to move my feet to get to controls, but on long stretches where I'm not fighting through traffic, it doesn't seem like that big of risk.
Remember that you have pretty much full braking control from the hand lever alone on your '02. it's one of the advantages of the Integral brakes. That doesn't help with sudden downshifts, but it is something to consider.
 
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