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Fishing for feedback on bar risers and peg lowering kit for my 2010. What has your experience been?
 

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flienlow said:
Fishing for feedback on bar risers and peg lowering kit for my 2010. What has your experience been?
Interestingly enough, a custom seat (truly a custom seat -- discussing my objectives before making the seat) eliminated my desire for bar risers, or a peg lowering kit. I haven't thought about either since receiving my custom seat from Bill Mayer Saddles.
 

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I've been researching bar risers for my 2010 RT, and here's my summary by vendor including cost and change in handlebar position. From what I've seen from other postings, many of these bar risers work fine.
ps.
Some of these data/costs may be old from 2010 when I started compiling this list.

Wunderlich $119
- 25mm taller (0.984”).

Ilium $89.95
- Up .898" and back 1.032" for a total diagonal movement of 1.375". Stresses brake line.
- Part #11-600 ($149.95) bar backs for 2010-11 include extended front brake line and mounting manifold.

Suburban Machinery $99.95
- Net change .894” up, .447” back. No change to brake line.

Moto-Techniques $69.95
Moves bars up & back diagonally ~1" to unload weight from wrists & forearms and relax the neck. Uses stock control cables and requires no modifications. New bolts are supplied.

Vario Handlebar risers $235
- Allows a wide range of adjustment: The base position has the handlebars 30 mm (1.18”) higher than standard. Then the step-less adjustment allows them to be moved back toward the rider by up to 20 mm (0.78”). Additionally, each handle bar can be moved outwards by up to 25 mm (1”) from standard. This results in massive 50 mm (2”) overall increase in handlebar width for a true “touring” feeling.

Heli Bars $119
- Raise them 1" (25mm) and move them towards the rider 1" (25mm).

Touratech $129
- Raise the handlebar by approximately 20 mm (~.8”).

CVM Touring $75
- Bar Backs move handlebars 1 inch up, and 1 inch closer to rider.

Verholen R1200RT Adjustable Handlebar Risers (from Creative Cycle Concepts) $330
- With other risers, you've been able to move your handlebars up and back. Now ONLY from Verholen, not only do you get 25mm up, and 35 mm back, you also get handlebars that PIVOT on the Vario Handlebar Plate, by up to 15 degrees for each handlebar. That's a 1.7 inch diagonal rise , PLUS adjustable pivoting mounting plates that move your hand grips further away from the bike. Not only do you get relief for your neck shoulders and back, but you also get more elbow room and relief for your wrists.

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I ended up installing the Verholen. Well made but very pricey and the pivot flexibility didn't do me any good because the only adjustment was AWAY from me. It might be useful to a tall person with long arms but I was trying to get my bars back closer to me. Other lower cost products would have sufficed.

The Verholens also use the full limit of my clutch and brake lines on my 2010 RT. I would acually feel a little safer with new longer lines but they've been working out so far. They really only create tension in the cables when the handlbars are turned to either full lock position.

But overall I'm glad I got them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
There is always an A student in the class and you are one of them. Thank you for your post. I think I will go for the CVM.

Do you have any experience with Peg lowering for the RT?
 

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I recently installed the Suburban Machinery peg lowering brackets.

About me - 6" 2", 230 pounds. Bill Mayer seat built so that the top of the seat is the same as the stock when in the "Upper" position, but the seat is mounted in the "Lower" position. Ride 1000miles/week. Have osteoarthritis in right knee.

The brackets mounted easily in less than 10 minutes. I was able to lower the brake pedal by 3/4" with no drama and that has been sufficient. Was able to change the shifter position sufficiently with just the pivot on the front of the lever. I wear Gaerne Explorers on my size 11 feet.

I used to get pretty extreme pain in my knee after about an hour of riding, which made it necessary to stretch my leg out or stand up for a bit. The problem with stretching my knee out while riding was that it would sometimes lock up and then painfully pop as I was bringing it back to the foot peg. The problem with standing up at 70 mph was that it scared the crap out of the other people on the road. Didn't bother me, but hey.

After the pegs were lowered my knee pain went away completely.

The brackets are spendy, but I'd have paid twice for the results.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just what I needed to hear Tom. Thank you. I have 31" inseam and the RT pegs are still to high for me.that was the one complaint I had about my 07.It wasnt until after I sold it that I realized what the issue was. I just knew that something wasnt right.
 

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I'm 6'2", 34" inseam, 200 pounds, right knee was shattered 4 months ago in an accident. I'm on the stock seat (until next week) in the high position. The difference between the stock peg location and the lowered position is night and day. It's far more comfortable for the bad knee, and it's marginally better for the good one. The only downside is that I've dragged both toes through fast corners.
 

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05Train said:
....The only downside is that I've dragged both toes through fast corners.
That kinda freaked me. I expected the pegs to scrape but my toes hit first, too.

Tom
 

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12R12RT said:
That kinda freaked me. I expected the pegs to scrape but my toes hit first, too.

Tom
Over the space of about three years I added barbacks (I think they were HeliBars) and the Suburban Machinery peg lowering kit. Much more comfortable now although the toe-dragging thing was a surprise to me, too. OK once you get used to it but the first couple of times were unsettling.



JayJay
 

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Moto-techniques barbacks and Sub-Mach Peg lowering kit on my '09!

Me: about 5' !1" 32" inseam.

Rich's Custom seat!

More comforatable in all aspects!
 

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If you enjoy carving corners, do not, I repeat, do not install lowered pegs.

My bike came with them installed by the previous owner. It reminded me of riding my old HD through corners.

I wore the peg studs down to about 50% in no time at all, not to mention the horrible experience of setting yourself up for a beautiful corner entry only to be wrestling the bike to stay on your side of the road as the peg drags and wants to take your foot off the bike as you go.

If you dont like riding your bike like that, knock yourself out. :)
 

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dadicool59 said:
If you enjoy carving corners, do not, I repeat, do not install lowered pegs.

My bike came with them installed by the previous owner. It reminded me of riding my old HD through corners.

I wore the peg studs down to about 50% in no time at all, not to mention the horrible experience of setting yourself up for a beautiful corner entry only to be wrestling the bike to stay on your side of the road as the peg drags and wants to take your foot off the bike as you go.

If you dont like riding your bike like that, knock yourself out. :)
Or......

Make sure your corner mechanics are correct and hang off the bike when you know you're approaching the limit of the lean angle. Many riders find themselves dragging hard parts because they're not properly set up for the corner and apex late, which forces them to lean farther than they'd otherwise need to in order to get through. If you find you still need more, just slide your butt towards the inside of the corner and keep the bike further upright.

I've got maybe 1/4" worth of chicken strips on my tires, and I've dragged my toes, not my pegs. That's due to body positioning and (in one case) a really ugly line.
 

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I tried to install Heli Bar Backs on my 2011 RT. The two cables that come off the throttle side grip were too short. I had to return the Bar Backs. I did install the rider peg lowering kit. They are easy to install and work great.
 

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DocCarroll said:
I tried to install Heli Bar Backs on my 2011 RT. The two cables that come off the throttle side grip were too short. I had to return the Bar Backs. I did install the rider peg lowering kit. They are easy to install and work great.
I was looking for some confirmation that the Helibars did indeed stress the lines too much, especialy the brake line. Thank you. The head mechanic at my dealer's, a very competent man, plainly refused to install them on my 12012 RT, saying that the relocation of the brake line would probably end up with something breaking on the not so long run. Now, I am expecing a reply form Heli to get a complete refund, becaus they state that all lines «are retained», period.
 

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05Train said:
Or......

Make sure your corner mechanics are correct and hang off the bike when you know you're approaching the limit of the lean angle. Many riders find themselves dragging hard parts because they're not properly set up for the corner and apex late, which forces them to lean farther than they'd otherwise need to in order to get through. If you find you still need more, just slide your butt towards the inside of the corner and keep the bike further upright.

I've got maybe 1/4" worth of chicken strips on my tires, and I've dragged my toes, not my pegs. That's due to body positioning and (in one case) a really ugly line.
Im a little confused by this message?
If you are saying that the limit of the lean angle in this case is the footpegs and not the tyre surface then surely reducing the available angle isnt a positive regardless if you weight shift? Less available angle is less angle right?
I tend to steer the bike rather than lean it?
Fit them by all means, there will always be someone on Ebay that will buy them if you find you dont like them.
Re-fitting the return spring is a little tricky but master that and its a 10 minute job.
 

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05Train said:
Or......

Make sure your corner mechanics are correct and hang off the bike when you know you're approaching the limit of the lean angle. Many riders find themselves dragging hard parts because they're not properly set up for the corner and apex late, which forces them to lean farther than they'd otherwise need to in order to get through. If you find you still need more, just slide your butt towards the inside of the corner and keep the bike further upright.

I've got maybe 1/4" worth of chicken strips on my tires, and I've dragged my toes, not my pegs. That's due to body positioning and (in one case) a really ugly line.
Actually, as a safety measure, late apex is a good thing and the line I ride. A late apex keeps you out path of an oncoming vehicle crossing the center line in a curve.

I have my pegs lowered and have scraped maybe 3 times and almost had to use x-tra effort to get over that far.

dcool59 must be really riding ultra aggressively. I ride with some pretty good rider, Gt's Aprillia and a K1300s stay up with them for the most part and rarely drag my pegs!
 

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dadicool59 said:
Im a little confused by this message?
If you are saying that the limit of the lean angle in this case is the footpegs and not the tyre surface then surely reducing the available angle isnt a positive regardless if you weight shift? Less available angle is less angle right?
I tend to steer the bike rather than lean it?
Fit them by all means, there will always be someone on Ebay that will buy them if you find you dont like them.
Re-fitting the return spring is a little tricky but master that and its a 10 minute job.
I don't know which is the limiting factor, and that's not really important. You can go faster through a corner using less lean angle if you're off the bike. I'm assuming when you say "steer", you mean "countersteer". If that's the case, then the lean and the weight shift are what makes the bike follow the line.

Atomicman said:
Actually, as a safety measure, late apex is a good thing and the line I ride. A late apex keeps you out path of an oncoming vehicle crossing the center line in a curve.
True, but it also requires more lean to execute the corner. A late apex makes the ride more fun though precisely because you're tightening the corners rather than straightening them.
 

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05Train said:
I don't know which is the limiting factor, and that's not really important. You can go faster through a corner using less lean angle if you're off the bike. I'm assuming when you say "steer", you mean "countersteer". If that's the case, then the lean and the weight shift are what makes the bike follow the line.

True, but it also requires more lean to execute the corner. A late apex makes the ride more fun though precisely because you're tightening the corners rather than straightening them.
Not true if you use the entire lane and start your corner out at the fog line (as you should to give more down the road visibility) and finish at the fog line hitting a late apex, you have essentially straightend out your line and corner and shortened the distance traveled and also carried more speed.

Apexing is the art of straightening out a corner by using the breadth of the lane or roadway. A fast descender will set up his or her line well in advance of a corner, entering it from the outside edge of the road for the widest possible angle. The apex, or mid-point, is crossed at the opposite or inside edge of the road, finally exiting again on the outside (always leaving room for traffic, error and unforeseen hazard). The key is to _gradually_ get into position and _smoothly_ follow the line through the corner. If you find yourself making _any_ quick, jerky movements take that as a sign that you need to slow down and devote a little more attention further up the road.
 
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