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Discussion Starter #1
My '06 RT has bar risers and grip puppies installed. I'm pretty comfortable on the bike but after about an hour my left arm pumps up and gets sore. I don't have this problem with my other bikes and I'm not sure where to start.
Would smaller/different grips help or should I return the bars to the stock height?
Anyone else ever had a similiar issue with an RT?
Thanks.
 

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There is much to say on this topic and much has been written on this forum. (Most of it by me)(PM if you want more.)

The short answer is to take off the risers and learn how to hold your body while you ride.

There is a pretty good chance that you are trying to support your upper body with your hands/arms. If this is the case, that is your problem. Next time you ride- just lift both your hands off the grips a quarter of an inch and continue going- maybe 5 minutes. You should not have to hold yourself up with your hands.

The Reference is to something called Master Yoda Riding Position-MYRP. Use Google... read-think, read-think, exercise then you will be fine... will probably take most of a year. It is not easy since you will be re-learning old habits and re-setting muscle memory, but it will pay off in becoming a better rider.

Note: None of this applies if you have a medical problem. Solve that first.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks hopz. I will try lowering the bars, that should bring my riding position closer to that of my Bandit on which I have no such issue. The risers were already on the RT when I bought it, perhaps they are just not for me.
 

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hopz said:
There is much to say on this topic and much has been written on this forum. (Most of it by me)(PM if you want more.)

The short answer is to take off the risers and learn how to hold your body while you ride.

There is a pretty good chance that you are trying to support your upper body with your hands/arms. If this is the case, that is your problem. Next time you ride- just lift both your hands off the grips a quarter of an inch and continue going- maybe 5 minutes. You should not have to hold yourself up with your hands.

The Reference is to something called Master Yoda Riding Position-MYRP. Use Google... read-think, read-think, exercise then you will be fine... will probably take most of a year. It is not easy since you will be re-learning old habits and re-setting muscle memory, but it will pay off in becoming a better rider.

Note: None of this applies if you have a medical problem. Solve that first.
Speaking the truth this guy is.

Another bonus is the better machine control you'll have with a light touch on the bars.
\v/
 

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The short answer is to take off the risers and learn how to hold your body while you ride.
Exactly where to start. Risers are great - when they work for your riding crouch. That has to do with bar height, shoulder distance from the bars and how upright you are trying to ride. The curve of your spine is involved here. Pretty easy to have too much curve and lightly compress a nerve, which would give you the exact result you're describing as well as the possibility of some tingling/numbness in an arm or hand.

The grip puppies are not going to be the problem.
 

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forgot to say... I love my Grip Puppies... best $10 I ever spent on a bike accessory.
 

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Ride on the balls of your feet, this engages your stomach and back muscles, now u will not have to have a death grip on the bars to support your weight.....try it, this will cure a lot of ills. Kieth
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Removed the risers and that seems to have cured the problem. After 100 miles today no arm cramp. Another issue I had was inadvertently rolling on the throttle with the cruise control on, that has been cured also. The riding position with the risers just was not right for me.
 

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One last thing to check before the case is closed:

As you are riding, check the angle of the top of your hand in relation to the top of your forearm. Ideally, there should be no angle; a line traced from your elbow to the top of your had should be perfectly flat. If not, rotate your grip/lever controls forward until the angle disappears.

NOTE: I know an adventure rider who actually prefers a bit of an angle on his dual sport bike. He feel it adds a bit more control off-road. This same person uses a flat angle on his F800ST, however.
 
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