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Is it true on the LT's that no matter if you hit the front brake with your hands or using the right foot, the pressure applied to the front and rear calipers is the same, so brake ware should be at the same rate no matter which braking method one choses?
 

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No. Short answer. IIRC and that may be debatable. On the linked brake bikes (2002 on) the hand lever actuates all the calipers, the foot only the rear and one front caliper, BUT the brake system also varies the pressure front to back based on speed and other factors. E.g. the foot brake only actuates the rear brake when the bike is under 5 or so mph.
 

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It depends on the year of the bike. On my 2003 if I touch the rear break lightly only the rear goes, then more pressure the front engages. Same with the front breaks. Front first then with more pressure the rear engages. I can hear the power assist break servos engage with slightly different pitch and can tell when one is going or two. Even though one controller engages both if you add in the other you add more breaking power. What the exact proportions are I couldn't tell you. So stay off that front break in parking lots.
 

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jkersh1 said:
No. Short answer. IIRC and that may be debatable. On the linked brake bikes (2002 on) the hand lever actuates all the calipers, the foot only the rear and one front caliper, BUT the brake system also varies the pressure front to back based on speed and other factors. E.g. the foot brake only actuates the rear brake when the bike is under 5 or so mph.
Actually the answer is YES for the years listed. There is no split in the front brake hoses back to the ABS unit so you get ALL calipers regardless of which input if you are braking hard. A soft touch on the rear will give only rear caliper... up to a point then you get fronts as well. Like wise on the front. A very light touch gives only front and no rear... up to point.

The ABS unit sorts out the correct pressure for each based on wheel speed and pressure input.

The early years are neither linked at all and have no power assist.

During my ERC course back in 04, they were scratching thier heads as they have you do a panic stop from 35 with just rear, then just front, followed by both. My stopping point was exactly the same for all three manuvers.
 

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If you are asking if the front and rear pads wear at the same rate the answer is no. On linked systems the bike proportions the amount of force between the front and rear wheels. On non-linked systems the operator must do the same. Either way, the front tire carries the vast majority of your braking ability and absorbs the most load under correct braking. With that said, there are two front calipers and only one rear, so your front pads should wear sightly faster than the rear.

It is wise to use both brakes under normal use, as what you practice every day is exactly what you will do in an emergency. There may be a time when you are on something without linked ABS.
 

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deanwoolsey said:
If you are asking if the front and rear pads wear at the same rate the answer is no. Either way, the front tire carries the vast majority of your braking ability and absorbs the most load under correct braking.

It is wise to use both brakes under normal use, as what you practice every day is exactly what you will do in an emergency. There may be a time when you are on something without linked ABS.
+1 on that!
 

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To ensure you get all the brake pressure you want or need, use both brakes. And, as deanwoolsey said, using both brakes all the time will ensure you will use both brakes during an emergency, on any bike you may ride.
 
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