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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,
Despite my 8 weeks experience owning a 2001 1200LT I already have learned something about the radio, and would like to share it with you: when the BMW dealer delivered the bike to me he made a demo of all the features of the bike, including the radio. On the way back home (about 20 km from Buenos Aires down town), I noticed the broadcast stations started fading until only a "blank" noise was heard. Cd´s worked fine. Some days later I went back to have this repaired. One week later (??!!) I got the bike back with the problem apparently solved, along with an explanation of "the complexity" of the job they had done to fix it. Back home, the radio was dead again. I called the dealer saying I believed it had an antenna problem... but the guy said that it was impossible as everything was thoroughly checked. With the vast experience in radios I acquired as a Neurosurgeon :D I started to figure out what was wrong at the less complex part: the antenna. I looked into the service manual of the bike finding only a drawing of the antenna, no info about connections, etc. I removed the plastic cap, unscrewed the fixing screw and pulled from the antenna´s rod to remove it from it´s housing. ON the rod, and under the screw was a so-called Morse connector (cylindrical piece of plastic with a slotted cone that expands when the screw is tightened) After removing completely the antenna´s rod there was a hole in the aluminum bracket that acts as antenna holder.. and at the other end a loose antenna cable. As these type of antennas are supposed to be bi-poles... there was any logic in this: as the inner lead is supposed to contact the rod and the mesh of the cable should be grounded. No parts seemed to be missing. Soldering the cable to the antenna´s rod and the mesh to ground would make no sense at all, cause it would prevent me to remove it in the future (Ie: to cover the bike during winter). So I took a piece of thick plastic (Coke bottle cap) and cut a round disk out of it. The disk fitted exactly into the hole in the antenna´s body holder. Later on I drilled a hole in the center of the plastic disk and passed a 10 cm long x 2mm OD electrical cable trough it. Next step was to strip 5 mm of the cable isolation, flattened it a bit and applied soldering stuff on it (to prevent it from rusting). Now I placed the disk into the hole, replaced the antenna rod, the Morse and tightened the screw. Finally I also placed the plastic cover on the rod. Using a tester I checked continuity between the antenna´s rod and the 2mm cable passing trough the hole of the antenna´s holder. Now I striped the bike´s antenna cable carefully separating the mesh (which i twisted to form a nude cable) and the inner -extremely thin + lead. As this lead is covered by a wide insulating tube, I striped 2 cm of the isolation of the 2 mm cable and pushed it into the isolating sleeve. Then I twisted the + antenna lead around the cable and soldered it. (previously I had slipped a plastic heat shrinkable spaghetti on it) Once the inner lead was isolated y soldered a washer to the cable made out from the twisted mesh and screwed it to ground. When I turned the radio on, sound quality was crystal clear and signal strenght excellent (Even the Long and Short Wave worked!!!) What I made was a easy contact inspired in those of the rear lights of any vehicle: a drop of soldering stuff connected to a wire contacting the bulb (in this case the antenna). I am very proud of this :histerica because a bit of common sense solved a problem BMW´s service could not diagnose after having the bike 1 week in their repair-shop!
 

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neurodoc said:
Hi there,
Despite my 8 weeks experience owning a 2001 1200LT I already have learned something about the radio, and would like to share it with you: when the BMW dealer delivered the bike to me he made a demo of all the features of the bike, including the radio. On the way back home (about 20 km from Buenos Aires down town), I noticed the broadcast stations started fading until only a "blank" noise was heard. Cd´s worked fine. Some days later I went back to have this repaired. One week later (??!!) I got the bike back with the problem apparently solved, along with an explanation of "the complexity" of the job they had done to fix it. Back home, the radio was dead again. I called the dealer saying I believed it had an antenna problem... but the guy said that it was impossible as everything was thoroughly checked. With the vast experience in radios I acquired as a Neurosurgeon :D I started to figure out what was wrong at the less complex part: the antenna. I looked into the service manual of the bike finding only a drawing of the antenna, no info about connections, etc. I removed the plastic cap, unscrewed the fixing screw and pulled from the antenna´s rod to remove it from it´s housing. ON the rod, and under the screw was a so-called Morse connector (cylindrical piece of plastic with a slotted cone that expands when the screw is tightened) After removing completely the antenna´s rod there was a hole in the aluminum bracket that acts as antenna holder.. and at the other end a loose antenna cable. As these type of antennas are supposed to be bi-poles... there was any logic in this: as the inner lead is supposed to contact the rod and the mesh of the cable should be grounded. No parts seemed to be missing. Soldering the cable to the antenna´s rod and the mesh to ground would make no sense at all, cause it would prevent me to remove it in the future (Ie: to cover the bike during winter). So I took a piece of thick plastic (Coke bottle cap) and cut a round disk out of it. The disk fitted exactly into the hole in the antenna´s body holder. Later on I drilled a hole in the center of the plastic disk and passed a 10 cm long x 2mm OD electrical cable trough it. Next step was to strip 5 mm of the cable isolation, flattened it a bit and applied soldering stuff on it (to prevent it from rusting). Now I placed the disk into the hole, replaced the antenna rod, the Morse and tightened the screw. Finally I also placed the plastic cover on the rod. Using a tester I checked continuity between the antenna´s rod and the 2mm cable passing trough the hole of the antenna´s holder. Now I striped the bike´s antenna cable carefully separating the mesh (which i twisted to form a nude cable) and the inner -extremely thin + lead. As this lead is covered by a wide insulating tube, I striped 2 cm of the isolation of the 2 mm cable and pushed it into the isolating sleeve. Then I twisted the + antenna lead around the cable and soldered it. (previously I had slipped a plastic heat shrinkable spaghetti on it) Once the inner lead was isolated y soldered a washer to the cable made out from the twisted mesh and screwed it to ground. When I turned the radio on, sound quality was crystal clear and signal strenght excellent (Even the Long and Short Wave worked!!!) What I made was a easy contact inspired in those of the rear lights of any vehicle: a drop of soldering stuff connected to a wire contacting the bulb (in this case the antenna). I am very proud of this :histerica because a bit of common sense solved a problem BMW´s service could not diagnose after having the bike 1 week in their repair-shop!
I always knew that fixing LT's is similar to brain surgery. :rotf: Nice job and great write up!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Fixing An Lt Is More Complex Than Brain Surgery!!!!!
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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13,908 Posts
Well done Cosme!!


That is exactly how this forum began, the dealers were clueless on the technology the LT brought to the forefront. We all had to figure it out ourselves.
Sounds like you have a few more skills than the average Neurosurgeon. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes I am a clever Neurosurgeon: besides repairing my bike´s antenna, I also can chew gum and cross the street at the same time! :)
 

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neurodoc said:
Yes I am a clever Neurosurgeon: besides repairing my bike´s antenna, I also can chew gum and cross the street at the same time! :)

Now.. once you can get comfortable turning the bike...we'll be impressed . =)

Just kidding.... Thanks for helping those loved ones in your care...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I appreciate your opinion! thanks a lot! Cosme
 
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