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Discussion Starter #1
I know the routine, it's not overheating unless the light comes on. That may be the pattern, but I just can't get comfortable with it. Has anyone put in a switch to turn on the fans BEFORE the needle gets way up there?
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Maybe this will help put your mind at ease:


Thermostat opening Temp 185 F
Fan cut-in Temp 221 F
Warning light cut-in Temp 239 F
From the BMW Manual.
 

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Not sure if anyone has ever tried this stuff in an LT but I used WaterWetter made by Redline it in my Kawasaki Concours and it dropped the engine temp by 20 degrees, made a big difference in the San Antonio Texas summer heat. The 4-stroke MXers love this stuff.

This is from their web site

WaterWetter® is a unique wetting agent for cooling systems which reduces coolant temperatures by as much as 30ºF. This liquid product can be used to provide rust and corrosion protection in plain water for racing engines, which provides much better heat transfer properties than glycol-based antifreeze. Or it can be added to new or used antifreeze to improve the heat transfer of ethylene and propylene glycol systems. Designed for modern aluminum, cast iron, copper, brass and bronze systems. Compatible with all antifreezes, including the latest long-life variations.
:thumb:
 

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joevano said:
OK, what's the boiling point of properly mixed coolant?
The boiling temperature is higher than the setting for the fans AS LONG AS THE COOLING SYSTEM IS PRESSURE-TIGHT. The coolant boils at a lower temperature without pressure, which is why you never open the radiator cap when the engine is 'hot' or the coolant may violently boil over and scald you.

Don't try this yourself. Believe me, I know... ;)
 

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I suspect that the fan switches are set so high because of the smaller current produced under conditions which would cause them to activate. In other words, idling in stop and go traffic probably doesn't produce adequate amperage to keep the battery charged if the fans are running all the time. The LT does have a very large output for a motorcycle alternator but everything has it's limitations. If you want to try this perhaps diverting the low beam current to the fans and isolating them with diodes would work. Probably all you would need is a dual pole dual terminal switch and a couple of isolator diodes for the fans.
 

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Living in South Tejas and not too far off the coast with a very high humidity level, I have my fans fun just about every time I am in town. I have yet to get to a over heating problem but like you, it is scary to see the needle go almost all the way up to the red zone before something happens. But every time the needle goes up, the fans kick on and the needle drops. It must work.
 

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First thing you need to do is check the fan connector on the bike. Is the positive or the negative being switched by the computer ?

I don't know but I'm going to guess the computer provides the ground to switch on the fans.

Either way . Use a diode to prevent the positive or negative you supply to the fans from gettting back to the computer.

This should be easy enough.

Good Luck.

John
 

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SteveL said:
Not sure if anyone has ever tried this stuff in an LT but I used WaterWetter made by Redline it in my Kawasaki Concours and it dropped the engine temp by 20 degrees, made a big difference in the San Antonio Texas summer heat. The 4-stroke MXers love this stuff.

This is from their web site

WaterWetter® is a unique wetting agent for cooling systems which reduces coolant temperatures by as much as 30ºF. This liquid product can be used to provide rust and corrosion protection in plain water for racing engines, which provides much better heat transfer properties than glycol-based antifreeze. Or it can be added to new or used antifreeze to improve the heat transfer of ethylene and propylene glycol systems. Designed for modern aluminum, cast iron, copper, brass and bronze systems. Compatible with all antifreezes, including the latest long-life variations.
:thumb:
I had some and after my first couple days in stop/go traffic I put it in.
I don't have any scientific measurements to go by, but I believe that it doesn't get as high as it used to before WW, watching the temp gauge.

Riding the open road, the needle hovers just below the 50% mark riding in ~90°/32° (F/C).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveL
Not sure if anyone has ever tried this stuff in an LT but I used WaterWetter made by Redline it in my Kawasaki Concours and it dropped the engine temp by 20 degrees, made a big difference in the San Antonio Texas summer heat. The 4-stroke MXers love this stuff.
Steve

I have used the WaterWetter made by Redline for years, in both my 99' and 05' LT and it does make a difference in running cooler.

Randy Ferras
K1200LT 05'
 
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