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Discussion Starter #1
A couple of us are considering a trip to Alaska for next year and are in the early stages of planning, I know the roads are paved pretty much to the end of the Elliot Hwy but then the Dalton sounds like mostly gravel. Has anyone ridden an RT on the Dalton Hwy, or is it just foolish to even consider doing the last 400 niles to the Acrtic Ocean on an RT (2008).

thx

Ron
 

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It's been done on everything from dirt bikes to Harleys and Goldwings. No reason a RT couldn't do it.
 

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I'll be running the Dalton to the Artic Circle in June on my RT. All the reports are it is rough but something that shouldn't be a problem riding. We're planning to base camp in Fairbanks for about 4 days and use one of the nicer days to ride up to the AC and back down to Fairbanks in one go. I'll post a better answer when I return in August.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Teach, I'll be interested in a report on your trip...good luck
Husky, thanks for the link, I see his RT made it to the Arctic Circle sign and then turned around, I was hoping to make it to Deadhorse, another 270 miles.

Ron
 

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A few years ago I made the Alaska trip on a '91 R100GSPD. My friend was on a K1200LT with a Hannigan sidecar. He was suppose to have a GS but said at the last minute he got an offer he couldn't refuse. I was very skeptical. However, he didn't have a problem except for losing his front fender and breaking an exhaust weld, both minor problems which were fixed on the way home. I also broke a windshield brace. In fact, he did better than I when stuck in wheel ruts following "Follow Me" maintenance vehicles. Motorcycles were placed at the front followed by cars, trucks, a big motorhome, etc. behind the "follow me" vehicle. When big dirt/gravel haulers were coming at us the follow me truck would signal all to more out of the way. Imagine trying to get a 2-wheeler out of a 1' wheel rut . I had to find a place to sort of S turn out. The KLT just plowed right on out. We washed out bikes whenever we could at car wash places when back. If we didn't, the stuff we picked up from the crap on the roads would harden like a thick coating of snot. A lot more work to clean.
Was it worth it. You bet. I'll be back.
 

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A few years ago I made the Alaska trip on a '91 R100GSPD. My friend was on a R1200LT with a Hannigan sidecar. He was suppose to have a GS but said at the last minute he got an offer he couldn't refuse. I was very skeptical. However, he didn't have a problem except for losing his front fender and breaking an exhaust weld, both minor problems which were fixed on the way home. In fact, he did better than I when stuck in wheel ruts following "Follow Me" maintenance vehicles. Motorcycles were placed at the front followed by cars, trucks, a big motorhome, etc. behind the "follow me" vehicle. When big dirt/gravel haulers were coming at us the follow me truck would signal all to more out of the way. Imagine trying to get a 2-wheeler out of a 1' wheel rut . I had to find a place to sort of S turn out. The KLT just plowed right on out. We washed out bikes whenever we could at car wash places when back. If we didn't, the stuff we picked up from the crap on the roads would harden like a thick coating of snot. A lot more work to clean.
Was it worth it. You bet. I'll be back.
 

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I lived in Alaska for 25 years with 20 of those in Fairbanks. I've driven the Dalton more times that I can remember/care to think about in those years.

It is certainly doable in or on any form of vehicle that you can imagine so an RT would have no technical issues in doing it.

However, it is critical that you and your machine are prepared for the ride; mechanically, physically and mentally.

The Dalton is a working road that supports the North Slope oil fields. Yes, it is open now as a public highway for any and all to travel on, but first and foremost it is owned by the 18 wheelers. To them, this is their daily commute and bread-and-butter, so they will be operating at speeds that may not be entirely conducive to a warm shared road experience; if you see a semi coming down the road, move over and brace yourself.

It could be a trip of a lifetime - but be prepared.
 

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I did Alaska last summer on my Ural. Is that as adventurous as a scooter? :) Not.

But, I decided not to do the Prudhoe route due to the advice of two DOT employees who said they were presently laying down inordinate amounts of ikky chemicals on that dirt highway that harden the surface for the truckers, but, for me it would require a dental hygienist many hours, if not days, to remove that crud from the nooks and crannies of my gorgeous Russian rig.

I consulted with "Olga", and, after much deliberation, we decided to pass.

This is Mt. Robson, Canada, on my way to Yukon Territories and AK.

 

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four12 said:
I lived in Alaska for 25 years with 20 of those in Fairbanks. I've driven the Dalton more times that I can remember/care to think about in those years.

It is certainly doable in or on any form of vehicle that you can imagine so an RT would have no technical issues in doing it.

However, it is critical that you and your machine are prepared for the ride; mechanically, physically and mentally.

The Dalton is a working road that supports the North Slope oil fields. Yes, it is open now as a public highway for any and all to travel on, but first and foremost it is owned by the 18 wheelers. To them, this is their daily commute and bread-and-butter, so they will be operating at speeds that may not be entirely conducive to a warm shared road experience; if you see a semi coming down the road, move over and brace yourself.

It could be a trip of a lifetime - but be prepared.

I totally agree!! Also, I work in Deadhorse / Prudhoe Bay and there is nothing to see at that end...except for saying you made the trip. In about 15 minutes you will have seen all that you can see, as the general public cannot go past the guard shacks and onto the oil lease. So, making the trip is the prize!!

It can be done, but my RT will never see that road!! I don't even want to take my 4 wheel drive truck up that road.

P.S. fuel was around $5.50 / gal when I left there a week ago.

Be careful and enjoy the trip.

Alaskan
 

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We road from Seattle to Fairbanks. I on my RT, one GSA and one 650GS.

I was originally going to try to go to Prudhoe but for whatever reason I decided to let the bikes that were designed for that type of riding to go on up. I chose to go south to Homer and Seward - I am glad I did - absolutely BEAUTIFUL!

While every type of bike has made the run to Prudhoe why try it on a bike designed for pavement? Take a dual sport up and you'll probably enjoy it alot more, especially if go down, event at 5 - 10 mph drop you are looking at some serious dollar amounts of plastic to have to fix. On top of that, the chemicals they put on that dirt road are impossible to get off of your exhaust and motor.

I will do the road one day, but it will be on the right bike. There is so much else to see in the area - I say, head south and be prepared to have you mind blown by the sheer beauty of that great area. P.S. book a night at Lands End Resort.
 

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I've read that most of the bike rental contracts say you cannot take their bikes up the Dalton, which tells me what I need to know.
As stated earlier we are keeping our fingers crossed we'll have a dry day to ride as far as the AC for some pics and turn around back to Fairbanks. If its wet and slippy I'll skip the pics. It just ain't worth damaging the bike in a get off for a pic at the AC.
I'm going to try and find a free blog site and set one up. Not sure where or when I'll have time to post on it, but it is a plan. I'll put a link here once I have it designed, but I have to warn you its all new to me bloggin.
 

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Alaskan said:
In about 15 minutes you will have seen all that you can see, as the general public cannot go past the guard shacks and onto the oil lease.
Alaskan
I understand that if you want to go out to the water's edge you have to go on a guided tour, which is available for a few $$.
 

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Teach said:
I've read that most of the bike rental contracts say you cannot take their bikes up the Dalton, which tells me what I need to know.
As stated earlier we are keeping our fingers crossed we'll have a dry day to ride as far as the AC for some pics and turn around back to Fairbanks. If its wet and slippy I'll skip the pics. It just ain't worth damaging the bike in a get off for a pic at the AC.
I'm going to try and find a free blog site and set one up. Not sure where or when I'll have time to post on it, but it is a plan. I'll put a link here once I have it designed, but I have to warn you its all new to me bloggin.
Teach,

A friend of mine participated in the Hoka Hey motorcycle challenge last year. His objective may not have been to win but rather see the continental United States and a few Canada provinces. So what took the top finishers 14 days or so to finish took him 40+. It was an incredible military retirement "gift".

During his adventure of a lifetime he simply used Facebook to capture his adventure. He would post his experiences to include pictures and video...it was amazing and served the purpose quite well.

Either way, I look forward to following your trip.

Scot
 

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Norms_427 said:
I understand that if you want to go out to the water's edge you have to go on a guided tour, which is available for a few $$.
You are correct. I don't know much about the tour buses, but do see them on occasion. I don't imagine that they let you out of the bus, and there really isn't much to see as far as the ocean goes. But then again, I work there so to me it is the same old thing every day. To someone else, it may be something to see.
 

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Rode the Dalton in July of 2010.

I would state that if you catch good weather, i.e. no rain! and are ahead of the DOT
laying down the sodium chloride, you may have a decent chance on an RT.

We rode F800GSs and were fine. The Dalton get's EXTREMELY slick when it rains, and even worse when they start laying on the SC.

If I was going to the AC, I'd wait for a dry day on an RT.

If you want to actually go to the Arctic Ocean, you need to contact one of the two motel/hotels in Prudhoe 24 hours in advance and provide your DL # so they can run
a background check. At least that was the case a couple years ago.
 

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Alaskan said:
I don't imagine that they let you out of the bus ...
I've seen fairly recent pictures of guys on one of these "tours" wading in the arctic ocean so they must let you out to at least get a picture of dipping your big toe in the water. :)
 

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About 3 weeks until I pull out of here and I'm looking forward to the trip now. I really hate a big buildup prior to a longish ride. Still working on a blog but should have a link for folks before I go. Regardless I'll be writing down some road journal type stuff so anyone who is planning to go can plan ahead for things that may not have anticipated, or some detours they'll want to add.
 
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