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Finally got in the mood to start into the LT’s maintenance and inspection cycle for its 24K service and preparation for a ride to Alaska. This is the first major maintenance cycle since I had the old girl apart for the clutch replacement.

I decided to start at the bottom and work my way up since I need to get her on the centerstand before I can do the valve clearance check. My main reason to work on the centerstand is to try to get any slop in the mounts oriented toward the rear of the bike to try to regain the clearance I formerly had for the oil filter cover rear bolt. The bolt came out fine when the bike came from the factory, but hit the cross bar after I had it apart for the clutch. So, I clearly had the centerstand and/or EHCS frame skewed towards the front of the bike. I was also contemplating greasing the centerstand bushings again if necessary and changing the transmission oil is much easier with the centerstand removed.

Got the centerstand off and the bushings look like they will go another 24K. I worked the centerstand by hand several times and it moved very freely. I remember how stiff it was when I first had it apart at the 54,000 mile mark. Now at 74,000 it still moves as slick as can be. I think the new o-rings and the Honda Moly 60 are holding up well.

I was pleasantly surprised to see how clean the bottom of the engine and transmission are. I was used to seen everything covered in grime, but it appears the new seals are holding up. The EHCS is quite clean as is the bottom of the engine. Looks like a little oil residue around the oil filter cover, but that is most likely from my last oil change.

I got the transmission fill plug loose (always do that one first just in case) and then the drain plug. It is amazing how much better these come out when properly torqued as compared to first time I removed them as they came from the factory. The oil looked and smelled almost as good as new. The drain plug had just a small amount of residue on it, but not bad at all for 20,000 miles. I would say the transmission is holding up well.

I took the shifter linkage apart and the new foam rubber donuts work MUCH better than the old felt washers. I need to order another one as I got only three when I had the LT apart before. I can’t remember if I just forgot that I needed 4 rather than 3 or if they came in a 3-pack and I just didn’t bother to buy two packs. Anyway, the only joint that was at all dry was the one that did not have one of the new foam donuts.

Lastly, I noticed some corrosion around the ground strap from the engine to the ignition coil cover, at least I think the coils are behind that box. I decided to coat the bolt and area around the strap with some dielectric grease to minimize future corrosion. Here are a few pics of progress to date.

One question for the cognoscenti, I removed the pull bar and bushing that the EHCS actuator rod uses to pull down the centerstand. It appears to have nylon bushings and I am not sure greasing it is a good idea as it will pick up all sorts of dust down there, but seems like some lubricant is in order. My current plan is to squirt some silicone spray on it and call it good enough as that will dry and not hold grit. What have you all done at this joint? Anything at all?
 

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Interesting strap, my 02 doesn't have that, I would bolt it directly to the frame or motor rather than go through the box to earth, that could be why there is corrosion you have an overlapping surface, just a thought and why is there an earth strap from the motor, to the motor. you said "I noticed some corrosion around the ground strap from the engine to the ignition coil cover"
 

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Interesting strap, my 02 doesn't have that, I would bolt it directly to the frame or motor rather than go through the box to earth, that could be why there is corrosion you have an overlapping surface, just a thought and why is there an earth strap from the motor, to the motor. you said "I noticed some corrosion around the ground strap from the engine to the ignition coil cover"
The fiche lists it as a “screening” for the coil. I assume this is what we would call “shielding” in the US. Probably meant to help reduce EMI/RFI from the ignition leads. Just a guess. You will have to ask BMW for a definitive answer.

Are you sure your 02 doesn’t have one? The fiche shows it on the 99-04 models as well as the 05-09.
 

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I didn't notice where the nylon bushings were when I refit my 01 with the EHCS but I am sure I used some grease on that pin right or wrong.

I also don't remember how grounded that cover is over the coil by itself so the strap may be needed for RFI.

That is about what my tranny plug looked like when I was looking for a reason to drop it again to look for that noise and touch the things I didn't know enough about to look at while it was apart the first time but it was so clean, it didn't provide the proper motivation so maybe in a week or so, I will get to my winter maintenance and decide to dive in.

Looking good so far Matt.
 

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I didn't notice where the nylon bushings were when I refit my 01 with the EHCS but I am sure I used some grease on that pin right or wrong.

I also don't remember how grounded that cover is over the coil by itself so the strap may be needed for RFI.

That is about what my tranny plug looked like when I was looking for a reason to drop it again to look for that noise and touch the things I didn't know enough about to look at while it was apart the first time but it was so clean, it didn't provide the proper motivation so maybe in a week or so, I will get to my winter maintenance and decide to dive in.

Looking good so far Matt.
Yes, my motivation has been lacking also. I got the bike on the lift back in November and stripped most of the tupperware off so I could remove the seat to send to RDL, but there it has sat since then. Just seemed more interested in other things of late, but it got into the 50s today so that was enough to get me outside.

Interesting. I just checked the fiche and do not see these bushings listed. Mine are pressed into each end of the centerstand where pin #14 rides. They have a collar so that you press then from the inside towards the outside and then part #13 slips in between the inner flange of each bushing and pin #14 then goes through the bushings.

I checked the fiche for both centerstand and actuator and neither seems to list these bushings. That is odd as they appear to be the main wear item in this joint.
 

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Yes, my motivation has been lacking also. I got the bike on the lift back in November and stripped most of the tupperware off so I could remove the seat to send to RDL, but there it has sat since then. Just seemed more interested in other things of late, but it got into the 50s today so that was enough to get me outside.

Interesting. I just checked the fiche and do not see these bushings listed. Mine are pressed into each end of the centerstand where pin #14 rides. They have a collar so that you press then from the inside towards the outside and then part #13 slips in between the inner flange of each bushing and pin #14 then goes through the bushings.

I checked the fiche for both centerstand and actuator and neither seems to list these bushings. That is odd as they appear to be the main wear item in this joint.
That is where I figured they were after you mentioned it. I didn't notice them at all. I was more concerned with the actuator and getting that cleaned up and the galls fixed in the shaft from someones careless use of vise grips getting the nut off the end. I have the timing belt I need to do on my PT Cruiser as well as any winter bike maintenance. It has been too cold to be in the garage with only a small propane heater. Soon though.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
That is where I figured they were after you mentioned it. I didn't notice them at all. I was more concerned with the actuator and getting that cleaned up and the galls fixed in the shaft from someones careless use of vise grips getting the nut off the end. I have the timing belt I need to do on my PT Cruiser as well as any winter bike maintenance. It has been too cold to be in the garage with only a small propane heater. Soon though.
Knowing BMW they probably only come if you buy the entire centerstand. Sort of like the latch handle on the top case... >:)
 

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That grounding strap goes from the underside of the cylinder head to the box around the coils, which is rubber mounted to the intermediate case.

I just put a little light grease on the pin after I have cleaned the bushings.
 

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I don't have anything to add, I am just happy to see you going. I was 6 days away from embarking on a 5 week trip there in June, 2011 with two other friends when my dad died and I had to cancel. My '04 R Was customized, I had knobbier tires waiting in Fairbanks for the trip up to the Arctic Circle, five day ferry ride back to Washington, I think about that missed trip a lot :). Might get there before I am too geezered, lol, hope you can regale us regularly once you get going.

Actually I do have something to ask, not add, Gordon...when you mentioned your shifter linkage and felt donuts, can you elaborate? I took my shift linkage apart via Kirk's lube video but didn't notice anything that would be a washer type of thing...please explain, did you go inside the gear box or something?
 

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I don't have anything to add, I am just happy to see you going. I was 6 days away from embarking on a 5 week trip there in June, 2011 with two other friends when my dad died and I had to cancel. My '04 R Was customized, I had knobbier tires waiting in Fairbanks for the trip up to the Arctic Circle, five day ferry ride back to Washington, I think about that missed trip a lot :). Might get there before I am too geezered, lol, hope you can regale us regularly once you get going.

Actually I do have something to ask, not add, Gordon...when you mentioned your shifter linkage and felt donuts, can you elaborate? I took my shift linkage apart via Kirk's lube video but didn't notice anything that would be a washer type of thing...please explain, did you go inside the gear box or something?
I think it was Matt that mentioned the bushings when taking apart the linkage. Mine has none on it and had none when I got the bike ( 4th owner) so they disappeared somewhere along the line. There is supposed to be a rubber or as the fiche says, plastic bushing covering the ball end opening to keep the grease in and the dirt out. It is #11 on the diagram and picture. They deteriorate and some have used felt to replace them when too far gone to reuse, I just use a heavy grease and clean them at least once a year but I should go ahead and get some to replace or go with the PowerGrid upgraded link but they are more difficult to remove for any service but probably a lot stronger.

1 23 41 7 650 149 PLASTIC BUSH 3 $2.95

BMW K1200 LT/R1200 GS Shifter Linkage - Powergrid, Inc.

You need to be careful with the replacement from PowerGrid as there is a certain year where they changed from a 6mm shift lever only ball thread to an 8mm shift lever only ball thread #3 on the fiche and for whatever model you have, that replacement would have to match the ends you need to thread in. Ebay doesn't seem to list them any longer so a call would be in order to see if they are still manufacturing them for the LT and what to order, or just get the rubber bushings.
 

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I think it was Matt that mentioned the bushings when taking apart the linkage. Mine has none on it and had none when I got the bike ( 4th owner) so they disappeared somewhere along the line. There is supposed to be a rubber or as the fiche says, plastic bushing covering the ball end opening to keep the grease in and the dirt out. It is #11 on the diagram and picture. They deteriorate and some have used felt to replace them when too far gone to reuse, I just use a heavy grease and clean them at least once a year but I should go ahead and get some to replace or go with the PowerGrid upgraded link but they are more difficult to remove for any service but probably a lot stronger.

1 23 41 7 650 149 PLASTIC BUSH 3 $2.95

BMW K1200 LT/R1200 GS Shifter Linkage - Powergrid, Inc.

You need to be careful with the replacement from PowerGrid as there is a certain year where they changed from a 6mm shift lever only ball thread to an 8mm shift lever only ball thread #3 on the fiche and for whatever model you have, that replacement would have to match the ends you need to thread in. Ebay doesn't seem to list them any longer so a call would be in order to see if they are still manufacturing them for the LT and what to order, or just get the rubber bushings.
OOPS, yeah got my Matts and Gordons confabulated, sorry :)


Great info, thx. Kirk never showed those in his video. I wonder if they roll down the shaft and you push them back up over the pin, hard to tell. That would keep some dirt out, possibly. I would like to see a picture of them installed.
 

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OOPS, yeah got my Matts and Gordons confabulated, sorry :)


Great info, thx. Kirk never showed those in his video. I wonder if they roll down the shaft and you push them back up over the pin, hard to tell. That would keep some dirt out, possibly. I would like to see a picture of them installed.
What an insult! To Gordon that is! :grin:

I will try to remember to take a picture of mine. The LT came new with felt washers to help keep out dirt and grit. At least my 07 came from the factory with felt. The felt was almost worse than worthless. The felt on mine absorbed water and held dirt and made a gritty mess around the linkage and really didn’t seem to keep out much grit. And the felt isn’t all that compliant compared to foam rubber.

When I ordered replacements a couple of years ago during my clutch repair, I received a newer style foam rubber donut. Unfortunately, the fiche listed only three and I didn’t go out and look at the bike to check that I really needed four. For some reason, the fiche does not show nor list a count that includes the one on the arm of the transmission itself. So, I placed the three I had on the linkage starting at the transmission and working outward since the one on the shifter isthe easiest to get to to clean. My plan was to buy a replacement when I next had it apart ... which is now. So, I have one in my cart and will order it once I know what buckets and other sundry parts I need. Hopefully, nothing more than a bucket or two as so far the old girl is looking pretty good given her major surgery almost three years ago now.

Of course BMW charges $3 for a 30 cent part, but nothing new there. There may be similar parts available elsewhere, but for $3 I am not going to spend time looking.

To install them, I just push them over the ball on the linkage, then grease the ball and the socket and then press together and insert the locking pin/clip. Just try not to get grease on the donut itself as that will only attract dirt. And enough grease oozed out around mine to keep them more than lubricated and to attract some dirt so no need to overtly grease the donut, at least that is my opinion. I have found over the years that in areas that get a lot of dirt, like the underside of a motorcycle, less is more in the grease department. I think being a little dry is better than a grease and grit grinding compound.
 

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What an insult! To Gordon that is! :grin:

I will try to remember to take a picture of mine. The LT came new with felt washers to help keep out dirt and grit. At least my 07 came from the factory with felt. The felt was almost worse than worthless. The felt on mine absorbed water and held dirt and made a gritty mess around the linkage and really didn’t seem to keep out much grit. And the felt isn’t all that compliant compared to foam rubber.

When I ordered replacements a couple of years ago during my clutch repair, I received a newer style foam rubber donut. Unfortunately, the fiche listed only three and I didn’t go out and look at the bike to check that I really needed four. For some reason, the fiche does not show nor list a count that includes the one on the arm of the transmission itself. So, I placed the three I had on the linkage starting at the transmission and working outward since the one on the shifter isthe easiest to get to to clean. My plan was to buy a replacement when I next had it apart ... which is now. So, I have one in my cart and will order it once I know what buckets and other sundry parts I need. Hopefully, nothing more than a bucket or two as so far the old girl is looking pretty good given her major surgery almost three years ago now.

Of course BMW charges $3 for a 30 cent part, but nothing new there. There may be similar parts available elsewhere, but for $3 I am not going to spend time looking.

To install them, I just push them over the ball on the linkage, then grease the ball and the socket and then press together and insert the locking pin/clip. Just try not to get grease on the donut itself as that will only attract dirt. And enough grease oozed out around mine to keep them more than lubricated and to attract some dirt so no need to overtly grease the donut, at least that is my opinion. I have found over the years that in areas that get a lot of dirt, like the underside of a motorcycle, less is more in the grease department. I think being a little dry is better than a grease and grit grinding compound.
Morning, Matt, lol, making cheat notes on all the names :). The balls and the receptacles were both pretty dry on mine, no grease just some grunge of dirt and grease residue mixed together, glad I saw the Kirk video on it. I paid 8 bucks each for two of those damper washers, lol. Back in the mid 80s when I had a Suzuki Cavalcade dresser I don't recall having or needing a damper on it and it was yuge, although I know it was lighter than the LT with its v4 engine.
 

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Here are pictures of the foam rubber donuts that BMW currently sells for the shift linkage.
 

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Got the oil back in the transmission today and re-installed the centerstand and actuator. I used a ratchet strap to hold a little rearward pressure on the stand as I tightened the bolts to try to keep all slop to the rear to provide as much clearance as possible for the oil filter cover bolt. I did notice that the front of the EHCS sees very close to the sump. I don’t recall it being that close before. Does anyone remember if yours is this close to the engine?

The front straps lined up fine with the holes, but I am wondering if I may have bent it upwards a little bit. I did hit a bump some time ago that caused the skid plate to bottom, but it wasn’t a super hard hit and didn’t even dent the skid plate so I didn’t think too much of it.
 

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Matt, have you made the trip before? I never got there as mentioned, however I planned the whole route for six months so I feel as if I did go, lol, especially with the daily live updates from my buds. Are you going to the Arctic Circle or staying down south of Fairbanks? I think the whole trip will be pretty civilized if not somewhat rustic if you take the north route across Canada. My buds said the only things they hated were the long stops at construction zones, the pea and larger gravel they used for fill and the stuff they used to keep the dust down on the dirt portions on the AC route...like riding on molten plastic at times they said. Lots of standing up, so practice your standing and keep everything as low on the bike as possible, lol. Dang, I really need to move a trip like this higher on my bucket list.
 

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My work got a little more extensive as I have two valves out of spec and four right on the low limit: 2 intake and 2 exhaust. This is the first adjustment I have had to make since the 27,000 mile adjustment so I guess that isn’t too bad for nearly 50,000 miles. I probably could let the exhaust cam go another cycle, but I prefer to not let the clearances get too tight and risk burning a valve. And as long as I have the slack out of the chain and have to remove one cam, not much more work to remove the other.

The odd part is that my intakes seem to wear faster than my exhaust valves which hasn’t been my experience with other engines.

The cams looked pretty good, but I do see a few small smears on a couple of the lobes. Not sure the cause, but looks like maybe a little dirt or something got on them. It doesn’t look significant enough to cause any issues. Now off to order 2.65 and 2.75 buckets.
 

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Matt, have you made the trip before? I never got there as mentioned, however I planned the whole route for six months so I feel as if I did go, lol, especially with the daily live updates from my buds. Are you going to the Arctic Circle or staying down south of Fairbanks? I think the whole trip will be pretty civilized if not somewhat rustic if you take the north route across Canada. My buds said the only things they hated were the long stops at construction zones, the pea and larger gravel they used for fill and the stuff they used to keep the dust down on the dirt portions on the AC route...like riding on molten plastic at times they said. Lots of standing up, so practice your standing and keep everything as low on the bike as possible, lol. Dang, I really need to move a trip like this higher on my bucket list.
No. We went to Alaska on a Princess cruisetour in 2008. We flew to Prudhoe Bay and then rode a bus down the haul road and flew home from Anchorage.

I had originally planned to ride to Deadhorse. My wife was going to spend a few days in Fairbanks while I rode a rental up the haul road. However, that would require 6 weeks and I have only 5 available this year. I spoke with someone who rode the Dalton several years ago (see the BWOM youtube channel - RIP billmaa) and he said he would not hesitate to ride his Hayabusa as far as the Arctic Circle. So, the plan is to ride to Fairbanks and call an audible on the Arctic Circle sign ride based on weather, road conditions and such. Then loop down to Anchorage and then back via Glacier National Park. We rode to GNP two years ago, but the Going to the Sun road was closed due to fires so I am hoping to get through it this year. We shall see how things go.
 
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No. We went to Alaska on a Princess cruisetour in 2008. We flew to Prudhoe Bay and then rode a bus down the haul road and flew home from Anchorage.

I had originally planned to ride to Deadhorse. My wife was going to spend a few days in Fairbanks while I rode a rental up the haul road. However, that would require 6 weeks and I have only 5 available this year. I spoke with someone who rode the Dalton several years ago (see the BWOM youtube channel - RIP billmaa) and he said he would not hesitate to ride his Hayabusa as far as the Arctic Circle. So, the plan is to ride to Fairbanks and call an audible on the Arctic Circle sign ride based on weather, road conditions and such. Then loop down to Anchorage and then back via Glacier National Park. We rode to GNP two years ago, but the Going to the Sun road was closed due to fires so I am hoping to get through it this year. We shall see how things go.
Ship your KLR up there, take it to the top and then ship it back, lol. I have friends at church trying to talk me into getting one and trailering it to Death Valley with them every Fall...it sounds fun but could also be my 22 year old brain writing a check my 62 year old knees might have trouble cashing, lol.

It all sounds like a lot of fun. My guys said the inland ferry ride back to Bellingham was time well spent letting butts and muscles heal :).
 

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Does anyone remember if yours is this close to the engine?

The front straps lined up fine with the holes, but I am wondering if I may have bent it upwards a little bit. I did hit a bump some time ago that caused the skid plate to bottom, but it wasn’t a super hard hit and didn’t even dent the skid plate so I didn’t think too much of it.
I suspect a good hit on the under rider is the case. I have seen several that were that close and just as many that were not. This under rider (05 +) has a larger lever arm than the early under riders and less support at the front. I would think it is more vulnerable to impact distortion.

In 110,000 I adjusted 8 intakes and one exhaust with the first ones at 48 K on my bike. I have seen tight intakes (1 @ .0015 and four @.002) and the engine was running fine on another bike.
 
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