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Read in my owners manual that to change the air filter, all I have to do is simply remove the fuel tank and presto, there it is. SERIOUSLY??? :wtf: . Remove the fuel tank? I have been around bikes and normally removal of the fuel tank is easy, but this is not a normal fuel tank. Is it that simple or is there a trick to getting the tank off? Seems like the tank is more of less the entire top of the bike. What about the radio and CB wiring and stuff? If someone can chime in and let me know it is that simple or a trick to getting this puppy off before I open my tool box, that would be great.

Thanks
 

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Bob,
BMW built the LT around an air filter, fuel filter, and oil filter. All three are buried pretty well. Upper Tupperware has to come off. The radio does too. Don't forget the seat and the brackets that hold it on. Once the tank is removed the air filter is under the cover, secured by 4 screws. It's very easy to change. Getting to it is the difficult part.

And make sure the tank doesn't have much fuel in it.

There are two fuel lines below the tank, two electrical connectors, one below the tank, one above, one tank vent line up front on top, and the overflow drain in the same place. When you separate the tank vent and overflow line near the right radiator/tipover wing, be sure to leave the couplings in each line on opposite ends. That is, leave one coupling in the line as it comes from the tank. Leave the other one in the line as it goes toward the back of the bike. This will ensure that you connect the lines correctly when you put everything back together.

This sounds like a daunting task. It's really not and you'll find this out once you've done it a time or two. There should be some members close enough to you to volunteer to help. You may want to post a thread in the regional discussion section where you live, asking for a tech session.

HTH
 

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Sorry, there is no simple way...she get's NAKED.

If you search the K1200LT forum you find info on the tupperware removal...after a few times, it's nothing.

Once you have it done, it will allow you to service, maybe the Quick Disconnects for the fuel tank if they haven't been updated (metal Vs plastic (original)).
If you are good at mechanics then you might also look at checking the valves (depending on your mileage), also info on 'How too' in the K1200LT forum.

Good Luck

Outbacker said:
Read in my owners manual that to change the air filter, all I have to do is simply remove the fuel tank and presto, there it is. SERIOUSLY??? :wtf: . Remove the fuel tank? I have been around bikes and normally removal of the fuel tank is easy, but this is not a normal fuel tank. Is it that simple or is there a trick to getting the tank off? Seems like the tank is more of less the entire top of the bike. What about the radio and CB wiring and stuff? If someone can chime in and let me know it is that simple or a trick to getting this puppy off before I open my tool box, that would be great.

Thanks
 

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You really don't need to remove the gas tank to replace the air filter, just move it away from the filter cover and the four screws that hold it in place. It's a pain but doable.
 

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:histerica Too more tank rearward enough getting access to the A/F cover and screws is 15 seconds away from removing the tank all together .... you really can't be serious.


billr said:
You really don't need to remove the gas tank to replace the air filter, just move it away from the filter cover and the four screws that hold it in place. It's a pain but doable.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Alright, thanks guys. I will search for tupperware removal and tackle this tomorrow.
 

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Given the time involved in getting to the airfilter, it really makes sense to plan service intervals for the KLT and do everything at once: fuel and air filters, valve check/adjmnt.

Some folks find changing the coolant to be no problem without removing anything, but I find it much easier with the tupperware off and so do coolant changes at the same time as the other stuff.

Lots of reports of fuel leaks due to failed connectors at the gas tank. The connectors should be upgraded to good quality metal ones. I recommend against moving the tank to access things without removing it from the bike as this will stress the hoses and connections. Disconnect fuel lines first, then remove the tank. And yeah, not having too much gas in the tank helps; been there done that! :(

Perhaps one of the biggest chores, at least on some bikes is getting the fuel tank/seat mount bolts lined up during reinstallation. I've learned that some of those fasteners want to go in before others and that they should all be left loose until they are all installed and then tightened. It is possible to gall the threads in the aluminum frame where these bolts seat if not properly aligned. Again, been there, done that. :(
 

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hi there in victoria i just did it fot the first time a while ago. seems a little scary but get ziplock bags & put the screws from each panel in its bag the screws are diffrent lenths.
but i had no serious problems.longer screws where panels overlap etc,make shure you have to put stuff .i used a pair of sawhorses and plywood.my air filter had 13000miles on it and was kleen .
 

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motorhead said:
:histerica Too more tank rearward enough getting access to the A/F cover and screws is 15 seconds away from removing the tank all together .... you really can't be serious.
Yes he IS SERIOUS! (unless fuel filter replacement is due)
The only thing I would add is that I use a couple of tennis balls to hold open various components and tupperware.
BTW it is well over 15 seconds, more like 15 minutes each way, and thats not figuring associated problems related to the QC's!
One last "trick" use some waterproof clear grease on all the rubber grommets and so forth to allow slick resetting of the tank and reassembly.
Takes me about 1 hour start to finish for the air filter.
BTW unless you live in a real dusty-dirty atmosphere don't bother with air filter until at least 24-30K miles.......
 

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Hummmm.... last time I checked the service manual for my 2000 BMW specifies that both the air filter and the gas filter be changed at the same interval. Maybe I missed something? So if the air filter is due, so it the fuel filter.

As far as folks choosing to make up their own service intervals, sure, it's your bike, have fun. But as far as extending service intervals, what I think I know about air filters is that you can't see if an air filter needs to be changed. By the time it looks like it needs to be changed, it is past due.

With respect to reqular maintenace on my KLT, I subscribe to keep it simple stupid, and just follow the manufacturer's recommendation. Seems to make sense both from keeping a bike I paid >$20K for, and if your bike is new and you don't want to violate the warranty terms it kinda makes sense too. Just sayin....
 

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I wouldn't take the thing apart just to change the air filter. As others have said, do it when you do the major service and you have to take it apart anyway.

That said, I took mine out and 12,000 miles and it looked brand new. I changed it only because I had the new one in my hand. Also you can just lift the tank and not remove it.
 

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CharlieVT said:
Hummmm.... last time I checked the service manual for my 2000 BMW specifies that both the air filter and the gas filter be changed at the same interval. Maybe I missed something? So if the air filter is due, so it the fuel filter.

As far as folks choosing to make up their own service intervals, sure, it's your bike, have fun. But as far as extending service intervals, what I think I know about air filters is that you can't see if an air filter needs to be changed. By the time it looks like it needs to be changed, it is past due.

With respect to reqular maintenace on my KLT, I subscribe to keep it simple stupid, and just follow the manufacturer's recommendation. Seems to make sense both from keeping a bike I paid >$20K for, and if your bike is new and you don't want to violate the warranty terms it kinda makes sense too. Just sayin....
not looking for a pissin' match.
yep you're correct, except if you're in a very dusty area, prob need air filter at 6k but not fuel. Did mine 3 x @ 24k and the filter was still serviceable, clean and low press drop across, although while in there i was sure going to replace it regardless. (BTW my local BMW FACTORY mechanic told me, mechanic to mechanic) 24K was a waste in our area.
Every area and driving habits are different and the manufactures rec's are a guideline sometimes too much and other times too little. Book says to unscrew oil plug to drain oil, etc, how many people do that? I just loosen the 3 screws.
I change my gear oil every 3k because it is such a small amount of lube and to observe the magnet and fluid color, but that is not what the book says, hmmm.....
 

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SmokinJoe said:
not looking for a pissin' match.
yep you're correct, except if you're in a very dusty area, prob need air filter at 6k but not fuel. Did mine 3 x @ 24k and the filter was still serviceable, clean and low press drop across, although while in there i was sure going to replace it regardless. (BTW my local BMW FACTORY mechanic told me, mechanic to mechanic) 24K was a waste in our area.
Every area and driving habits are different and the manufactures rec's are a guideline sometimes too much and other times too little. Book says to unscrew oil plug to drain oil, etc, how many people do that? I just loosen the 3 screws.
I change my gear oil every 3k because it is such a small amount of lube and to observe the magnet and fluid color, but that is not what the book says, hmmm.....
I'm with you. I figure I'm throwing away a perfectly good air filter and fuel filter every time I change 'em at 6K. And I keep on doing it.
I'm bone-headed you should know. :histerica
 

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I have changed fuel and air filters at 24k intervals on my dealer's honest mechanic's advice.
Bike has 75k on it now.

The air filter looks fine after 24k. I don't see a reason to change it any more often than that.

The fuel filter can easily go longer than 24k but I'm in there, why not change it too. It's the same size as on most cars and how ofter do you change them? The bike gets better gas mileage so it's filtering less fuel than the car too.
 

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Ok I am just an innocent bystander here. I am reading these different posts about filter replacement and I keep saying to myself I am lucky to have a new LT with a 3 year warranty to look forward to. Still these posts are very interenting. Also I am new to these forums but with a '79 Kaw'1000ST (past) and '85 Goldwing1200 (still have) I did not need a map to find oil, fuel or air filters. My LT will be 1 yr next month and before joining this forum last week I could not find the oil filter even if I used gps :) But seriously I am leaning more by reading all the different approaches. One thing I am afraid of is I will be a senior citerzen by the time my warranty is up and money is so scarce that I will be back in these achieves looking for help. I have emperty for those of you who have to deal with it now.
 

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Another other idea is to host or attend a local tech session, you'll learn a lot and have fun at the same time. Idea #2 look for a local club, ours is doing a spring tune up get together. For parts and some beer you get a lot of volunteer labor. :D
 
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