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I have held off for years buying a heated pair of coveralls and would like some advise. I have looked at the Gerbing site and they no longer offer the coveralls, best I can tell. I don't want to deal with two heavy pieces of gear and think a pair of heated coveralls would be simpler and lighter. My requirements are waterproof, heated and some skid protection. I want to leave my jacket, frog toggs, heated vest, sweat shirt, sweater and scarf at home.

Thanks in advance,
 

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Snowmobile/ski suit

Have you considered a pair of snowmobile or ski coveralls? Some folks claim the Carhart coveralls work well, too. I have used the "ski" coverall/bib with heated chaps from Widder... just fine all the way down to 23 degrees... that's as cold as I've been able to ride in Texas. Also, that allows "layering", etc. and we all know that helps.
 

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Over and over again on the boards here it's been said how great Gerbings gear is and how wonderful it feels to be warm. Doubters become believers in their heated gear, and they say so. Anyway, Gerbings has a 30 day unconditional promise that if you don't like what they send you for any reason, send it back and they return your money. I say give it a try. What can it hurt? d.
 

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Yeah, me too...
Up here in the polar bear country I have found the Gerbing liner to be the best investment (next to HID lights) as far as riding comfort is concerned. As most of my riding is commuting or otherwise "business oriented" the combination of just ordinary collar shirt + Gerbing liner + BMW Atlantis nubuck leather jacket is just perfect for my purposes. (For the legs either short or long sleeve underpants + Gerbing liner + Atlantis pants, (+ Gerbing socks when the temp goes below 5 deg C.) )

As I have meetings or I otherwise have to visit our company's different sites I can just undress the Atlantis gear and my boots (and replace them with my light sandals) and I can attended informal meetings with just my Gerbing liner pants + my shirt on.
I no longer look like the "Michelin man" when the weather gets cold.

Of course a proper heat controller (Heat Troller or similar) is the only way to power the liner. Preferably a two-channel unit where you can regulate upper and lower body separately.

One more vote for the Gerbing liners...

Regards
 

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Have it your way!

One less discussed option is that Gerbing will electrify coats, pants, and even coveralls. If you find some coveralls you like, call them and ask if they will do that make and what it would cost. If it's a quality garment they will usually do it. A First Gear Kilimanjaro Air Jacket was $145 to electrify the liner. I, on the other hand, don't seem to get that cold in the extremities(being from Chicago and all). I use a Sargent Chillivest with a pulse modulated regulator when it gets a little too nippy.
 

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Ah the topic of gear. I could go on and on (just ask my riding pals!).

Since I ride year round, I need good cold weather gear (cold in Texas being a relative thing true, but it does get down below freezing a few times each year).

I've reached gear nirvana for me with a combination of three outfits that cover me all year long from freezing cold to blazing heat (I'll mention the latter first just for completeness).

Joe Rocket Phoenix gear for any temps above 85F. Goretex Pac-Lite rain suit to cover these in the rain (much more durable and better fitting than Frogg Toggs but twice as expensive). The new JR Phoenix 4.0 jacket is the really nice.

Now for your question about the cold: I have two cold weather outfits and pick from them depending on the type of riding and the chance of long, hard, constant, driving rain. These are an Aerostich Darien jacket and pants and an Aerostich 1 piece Roadcrafter coverall. If my ride is multi-day with many stops and there's any chance of hard rain, I wear the Darien because it's 100% waterproof and I can shed the jacket when I stop. For trips of one day or less (and my daily commute) it's the Roadcrafter because it's easier to put on, has more protection, and just feels like a custom made space suit. I love it. However, it's only 95% waterproof.

Under any and all the above I wear a Gerbing jacket liner. It's very light weight and is enough over a tee shirt down to about 40F. Below that I'll go to a long sleeve shirt which works down to the mid-20s. That Gerbing liner will fry your bacon. Their gloves are great too.

Summary: I've tried a dozen different jacket/pants combos over the years and nothing works even half as well as that 'Stich stuff. Plus it is one of the few options out there that satisifies my instistance that all non-mesh gear be waterproof WITHOUT an additional liner. I hate to have to stop to done gear when it rains and I also hate having the outside of the garment get soaked even if an interior liner keeps you dry. Also, since I hate to take along tons of extra stuff, I'm really happy that the thin Gerbing liner packs so much heat.

BTW, my legs don't get cold but I understand the Gerbing pants liner is also a win. I just use a fleese liner under the 'Stich gear and I'm good.
 

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raywest said:
I have held off for years buying a heated pair of coveralls and would like some advise. I have looked at the Gerbing site and they no longer offer the coveralls, best I can tell. I don't want to deal with two heavy pieces of gear and think a pair of heated coveralls would be simpler and lighter.
I don't remember ever seeing heated coveralls from Gerbing.
But a Gerbing jacket liner and pant liner are very light and pack small. There is nothing heavy about them. Unless you meant the heated jacket and pants that were called Ultimate IIRC. They now have the Union Ridge series. But there is no armor in the pants.

My requirements are waterproof, heated and some skid protection. I want to leave my jacket, frog toggs, heated vest, sweat shirt, sweater and scarf at home.
Depends what kind of cold weather you ride in. Makes all the difference in how you need to prepare.



Bruno
Montreal, Canada
Gerbing G3 heated glove review
http://pages.videotron.com/mcrides/product_evals/gerbing/g3-gloves.htm
:
 
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