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Discussion Starter #1
Just got my new LT and love it. I'm used to heavy Harleys but the front end of the LT is heavier. When I come to a stop on the LT I put both feet down and then use the front brake gently. I feel the handlebar wants to go over too much to the opposite side and I'm afraid of dumping the bike. Any advice on a good technique would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Billy
 

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Try bringing it to a stop a little quicker. Easing it to a stop slowly is tougher to keep the front wheel straight as you try to balance at low speed.
 

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Agree with the last two posts.

Came from HD myself, and yes the LT is a bit tricky to stop. Practice is the key. My stops still won't cause crowds to cheer, but they are getting better.

When I had the Ultra, I would slowly roll to a stop. With the LT, I stop quicker, if that makes sense.

Above all, keep the handlebars straight.

You'll be fine, and congrats on a great ride.
 

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Billy said:
Just got my new LT and love it. I'm used to heavy Harleys but the front end of the LT is heavier. When I come to a stop on the LT I put both feet down and then use the front brake gently. I feel the handlebar wants to go over too much to the opposite side and I'm afraid of dumping the bike. Any advice on a good technique would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Billy
Rule 1: Keep your eyes up -- look straight ahead; does wonders for your sense of balance/security.

Suggestion 1: Some folks aren't comfortable with this, but I've done it for ~30 years: Get used to never putting your right foot down for a stop. That way you can always have available/use the rear brake pedal to control the stop, eliminating awkward throttle/front lever coordination issues.

One trick that makes this a cinch on each and every stop: At the moment you're just about to reach zero speed, input a little turn of the handlebars (about a 1/4") to the *right* -- this will make the bike naturally want to lean just a hair to the *left*, where your extended left foot will be waiting to take over the balancing. This gives you a sure-fire way of having the confidence to know that *you* can always determine to which side the bike will lean when stopping. This technique also eliminates the need to take your right foot off the rear brake at the last second. A short bit of practice and it becomes second-nature.

FWIW, in about 1 in 1000 stops, I'm not paying attention and have to put my right foot down. Other than that though, my right foot usually doesn't leave the right peg from the time I start a ride until I reach my destination (and I'm a daily urban commuter).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
When I bring it to a more rapid stop, as you suggest, do you just use the front brake at the end of the maneuver.
 

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Billy said:
When I bring it to a more rapid stop, as you suggest, do you just use the front brake at the end of the maneuver.
I do because I have both feet ready for the ground. I have short legs and can't flat foot it, so if I start to lean opposite of my intention, I have to be ready. I know Mark is a short inseam also, so I may try his one foot technique.
 

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ddavenport said:
I do because I have both feet ready for the ground. I have short legs and can't flat foot it, so if I start to lean opposite of my intention, I have to be ready. I know Mark is a short inseam also, so I may try his one foot technique.
I use the same technique as Mark, and I also stay in first gear with the right foot on the rear brake pedal, the left foot on the ground, and both eyes peeled to the mirrors... just in case the cager behind me forgets to stop, in which case I have a better chance of evasion.
 

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ddavenport said:
I do because I have both feet ready for the ground. I have short legs and can't flat foot it, so if I start to lean opposite of my intention, I have to be ready. I know Mark is a short inseam also, so I may try his one foot technique.
Hey! I'm not short, I'm "altitude challenged"


The last bike I flat-footed was my wife's 883 Sportster in the mid-80's (and I don't care to relive *that* episode again!). I rarely place more than the toes/ball of my left foot on the ground, but then iff'n ya think about it, you really don't need any more than that to operate any bike.
 

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Ditto on all the above, especially Mark's comments.

I took the MSF Experienced Rider Course a couple years back - made a huge difference! By the end of the day, I was making u-turns, both left and right, in a 24' box, with nearly full steering lock. Also got to confirm the ABS operation on sand and gravel (not part of the program, just happened to be on the course). Not only do you hone skills, you meet some fellow riders. Check www.msf-usa.org for schedule and locations.

Congrats on the new ride - you're gonna love it!!
 

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The LT isn't a "parking lot" 'scoot like the HD and its higher center of gravity does make a difference. As many others have said, practice! Learn to love your front brake. The bike isn't going to go over as long as you're holding on. But maybe a little "parking lot" time is in your future for practice. Once you are comfortable your confidence and enjoyment will skyrocket.
 

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Billy said:
When I bring it to a more rapid stop, as you suggest, do you just use the front brake at the end of the maneuver.
IMO, no front brake at the end of a stop. The final stopping should be with the rear brake and minimal front. Most drops I have heard of on the LT have come from using the front brake to complete the stop. DAMHIK. :rolleyes:
 

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<I feel the handlebar wants to go over too much to the opposite side>

Not sure what that means.

Just practice stopping on level road with the front wheel straight.

You will have to practice standing on the breaks way past the point your gut tells you is safe.

Bob, 00LT
 

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Congrats on the LT.
Don't worry too much if you have to use two feet at first. I still have to use both feet once in a while. It is a heavy bike, stay in your comfort zone for now. As they already posted practice, practice, practice.
I second the ERC recommendation. They'll also tell you left foot down, right foot on the break, clutch in, be in first gear and right hand on the throttle.
Another thread on the subject below.

http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14515
 

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Billy said:
This is a great Blog. I really appreciate all the input.
Just keep your hand off that front brake when the bike's under 10mph and you'll be fine. Using the front brake at low speeds is the best way to dump an LT.

FWIW, this is a "forum"...definitely not a Blog. :)
 

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Mark is right on with rule #1 Keep your eyes up -- look straight ahead; and the addition of the slight right bar tweak just before stopping is something I learned from this forum and WORKS.

Joe is absolutely correct with what should be rule #2 Just (ALWAYS) keep your hand off that front brake when the bike's under 10mph. I personally use both brakes and when the speed goes below 10 MPH only apply the rear brake.
(BTW you can CRAWL forward w/ rear brake and throttle applying smooth controlled power to rear wheel)

My thought is that rule #3 is to STOP no less than 6-8 feet from any obstruction in front of you, giving you an escape path and some stopping wiggle room.
And equally important, rule # 4, when STOPPING just STOP, avoid the temptation of trying to creep along for the light change thus avoiding the complete stop.
Practice a lot without a passenger, and then instruct a passenger to be still at low speeds.

Best wishes.
 

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SmokinJoe said:
And equally important, rule # 4, when STOPPING just STOP, avoid the temptation of trying to creep along for the light change thus avoiding the complete stop.
Oh, no, no, no!! How are you going to win the slow-ride contest at your next rally field events competition iff'n ya don't practice at every stop light??
 

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I have to chime in since it looks like one technik hasn't been mentioned:
one can slow down the LT by 'engine brake' and slipping the clutch during the last few yards, then using the brake only in the last instance to bring the bike to a complete stop.
 

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mneblett said:
Oh, no, no, no!! How are you going to win the slow-ride contest at your next rally field events competition iff'n ya don't practice at every stop light??
:) Hey, trying to give the new LT'r some insight before snuggling up against the rear of an 18 wheeler or garbage truck! :D
On the other hand creepin' is OK if done before rule # 4; STOP 6-8 feet from any obstruction in front of you.....the drivers behind me get PO'd though. (I need to follow my own advise!):rolleyes:

BTW, your little H-B right tweak really does work when conscientiously applied.
 
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