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Discussion Starter #1
I installed JD Paralever bushings to my LT last winter and then forgot about them...
Until this weekend when I was doing some wiring fixing around my Dauntless hitch connector.
I turned the rear wheel just for the heck of it and got really scared. The whole wheel was wobbling pretty bad. Soon I realized it was not the famous FD bearing since the whole FD was wobbling with the rear tire.
Then I realized that stupid me...I had forgotten to retighten the JD bushings after 500 miles as instructed in their manual. I had ridden over 2000 miles.:eek:

Anyway, I took off the rear wheel, disconnected the lower torque bar (or whatever its called) in order to verify the correct feel of the FD and tightened the inner bolt with athe help of a modified 30 mm socket. I got the problem fixed.

While crawling under the bike and working simultaneously with a torque wrench and a (extended) 14 mm allen key a (hypotethical) question popped into my head:

Would it possible to install the bearing studs the other way around? So that the stud with the locking nut would be on the outside of the swingarm and thus it would be much easier to adjust and keep it properly adjusted as well...
If I'm not mistaken in some earlier models the studs were installed this way, or were they?

Of course this also a somewhat aesthetic question, the fixed stud looks better on the front side of the bike than the stud with a locking nut, but is this the only reason to have them that way?

Regards
 

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Interesting question Ari,
Wheel alignment might be changed if the pivots were swapped around.
The length of the fixed (smooth outer) pivot determines where the final drive assembly is with respect to the swing arm.
If the pivots were swapped out, the wheel might be a little more to the right or the left, depending on dimensions of things.
This could possibly be corrected by installing a thinner or thicker shim between the wheel and the crown wheel hub where the wheel bolts on.
It is possible that there would be no significant difference, but I'd check the distance of the wheel from the swingarm before and after the pivot pin switch to be sure.

That's the only thing I can think of right off hand, but I haven't looked to see if the pivot pins could actually be switched. Are the seats for those pins on the swingarm the same allowing the pins to be switched?
And if they are switched, is the final drive assembly still reasonably centered on the swing arm? My guess is that it would be, but that should be confirmed too.

That is the sort of change I might make if it makes things a little easier to work on.

Let's see what others have to say....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Curtis, thanks for your valid comments,

pretty much the same thoughts crossed my mind as well. Of course I could pull off my FD and do the checking myself but I actually have two reasons why I'm looking for the "ready" answer from this site.

My first reason is of course being lazy and looking for a "been there done that" -type of answer.
The second reason is that when changing my pivot bearings last winter I simply followed the BMW factory manual and opened the outer (fixed) stud just with a long enough wrench and leverage...
Without heat gun of course as the manual does not say anything about using a heat gun! Well well... my FD outer stud obviously had some kind of Loctite or other glue on it - judging from the slight damage that the threads suffered.
Well, the stud went back in OK and I was able to tighten it to the required torque but I don't feel 100 % confident with opening it again just for "information sake". Therefore I'm hoping to find a "yes" or "no" answer from somebody who has either checked it already or has a possibility to do the checking while working on this part of the bike.

Might well be that this sounds too revolutionary and nobody has ever come across with this kind of "product development" - especially when the (possible) benefits are somewhat negotiable.

Let's wait and see...

Regards
 

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I was looking at many BMWs this weekend and some of the older models do have the pivot bolts the other way round. I wouldn't be surprised if the could be done that way.It would make checking the torque easier for sure.
 
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