BMW Luxury Touring Community banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
912 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The gears were slipping for the second time in 8k miles on the 2007 K1200LT. First time was 10/2010 at 16,960 miles and now at 3/20 with 24,320 miles, opened the tranny. No oil, but shreds of clutch plate material and the expected burnt smell.

Now, I do not think of the LT as a race bike.(Don't drink that much). Like everybody else, I do let the clutch out slowly from a standing start in first gear. After that, shifting is preloading the next gear, blipping the throttle and barely grabbing the clutch.

I routinely get beat off the line (LOL) by cars and pickups and most other bikes. We do most of our riding out in the country, through the hills in Wisconsin, and farm fields in IL and until this coming July, wherever the MOA Intl. meet is. We do not do much of any stop and go traffic.

I cannot see anything wrong with the hydraulic clutch mechanism. It shifts fine.

Any ideas out there? I know that we ride two up but we come in under the gross weight limit. And that has been the case for 90% of the miles form mile 5 on.

Any thoughts or experience to share?

Bill
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Wow!

I have to ask, who did the last clutch swap? Could there have been an install, uuuh... errr... ahem... variance, that caused the new clutch to disintegrate so quickly, as far as you can tell?

I am interested primarily because my clutch is slipping at about 30k miles and I am preparing to replace it myself; looking for any "gotchas" that you may uncover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
912 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The first was done by the service crew at Cyclewerks in Barrington, IL, which is where I got the bike.

Once the tupperware is off, the transmission open, it just about there from the look of it. That and maybe six clutch bolts and washers. Clymers here I come. It appears that new clutch spring, pressure plate, clutch plate and new seals were done last time. I am not sure anything but the clutch plate is needed here.

I am not sure what to do about parts. Beemer Boneyard maybe.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I went through three clutches on my 01. First (since I had the bike) was at 88k due to the slave cylinder issue. I figured that was reasonable. Fixed at the dealer, 8k later it began slipping again and was fixed under warranty with no questions asked. Third time was 5k later with no warranty coverage because the plates were completely worn out, so they took the position that it was my riding style. Odd that I've had no issues on any other bikes with either wet or dry clutches. I disagreed but paid for it.

Made it another 12K with no issues before trading the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
letting the clutch out slowly, depending on your definition of slow, is slipping the clutch, I have never worn out a clutch even in vehicles I use for towing - I engage the clutch quickly at low rpm, just above idle, the very very odd time I stall the engine but as I said I have never worn out a clutch
slipping a dry clutch will also shorten the life of the rear main seal
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
gary45 said:
letting the clutch out slowly, depending on your definition of slow, is slipping the clutch, I have never worn out a clutch even in vehicles I use for towing - I engage the clutch quickly at low rpm, just above idle, the very very odd time I stall the engine but as I said I have never worn out a clutch
slipping a dry clutch will also shorten the life of the rear main seal
Your report is consistent with other information posted here.

I believe the recommendation recently by those who know far more than me is to start out in first gear no higher than 1500 RPM. This seemed quite low to me, until I started keeping an eye on the tach when starting out. I was closer to 1100 most times.

Of course that does not explain why my clutch is slipping at 30k, mostly one-up interstate cruising between Dallas and Santa Monica, and no leakage/contamination as reported by stealer. I guess I am just that kind of lucky!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
876 Posts
Getting the bike moving as quickly as practically possible, without engine rpm above 1500 is the skill that needs to be developed. This minimises the time that the clutch slips for, sounds like you are well aware of this technique though. One other thing to be mindful of, make sure you don't have the habit of resting a finger on the clutch lever while riding, this is similar to "riding" the clutch in a car by resting a foot on the pedal. You'd be surprised at the amount of people who do it. The high mechanical advantage of the clutch slave over the clutch spring means some tension is easily taken off the clutch when this habit occurs. Other than that, I'd be closely inspecting that clutch plate and surrounds when dismantled.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,108 Posts
Make sure you don't ride with your fingers on the clutch lever. While you will not feel it, pressing the lever even slightly will cause pressure to build in the line and cause premature clutch failure. I'm not saying that's what happened, but it is a reality with all hydraulic clutch systems.
 

·
Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
Joined
·
15,061 Posts
WildBil said:
The first was done by the service crew at Cyclewerks in Barrington, IL, which is where I got the bike.

Once the tupperware is off, the transmission open, it just about there from the look of it. That and maybe six clutch bolts and washers. Clymers here I come. It appears that new clutch spring, pressure plate, clutch plate and new seals were done last time. I am not sure anything but the clutch plate is needed here.

I am not sure what to do about parts. Beemer Boneyard maybe.

Bill
Based on the low mileage I would agree but bassed on the fact that there are shreds of material I would inspect the surfaces for blue heat spots and checking of the steel. If you find none then re-use but place a straight edge on them and make sure they are flat. Other than exceeding 1500 rpm before the clutch if fully released I can not think of anything else that would cause a dry, premature wear. Make sure there is a small weled ring behind the spring plate when you take it apart. If that was left out that could explain the low mileage. Item 2 in the diagram. Also order new bolts #7.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
912 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
deanwoolsey said:
Make sure you don't ride with your fingers on the clutch lever. While you will not feel it, pressing the lever even slightly will cause pressure to build in the line and cause premature clutch failure. I'm not saying that's what happened, but it is a reality with all hydraulic clutch systems.
Great thought. I do that mostly with 2 fingers on the other hand, but i cannot swear to never being symmetrical.

Thanks.
Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
912 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
jzeiler said:
Based on the low mileage I would agree but bassed on the fact that there are shreds of material I would inspect the surfaces for blue heat spots and checking of the steel. If you find none then re-use but place a straight edge on them and make sure they are flat. Other than exceeding 1500 rpm before the clutch if fully released I can not think of anything else that would cause a dry, premature wear. Make sure there is a small weled ring behind the spring plate when you take it apart. If that was left out that could explain the low mileage. Item 2 in the diagram. Also order new bolts #7.

Yes, will check that all the surfaces true up and will order the six bolts and washers.
Thanks

I have been reading this site almost daily since 2006. I am constantly amazed by the wisdom and helpfulness of everybody who lurks here.

Bill
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top