BMW Luxury Touring Community banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I recently purchased a 99 K1200lt, which I absolutely love, after a 20 year hiatus based on a pledge that I wouldn't ride a motorcycle until our kids were grown. I've been riding the bike now for about a week, and have progressed day by day with cornering and the like, but 2 up riding has been a challenge. Tipped the bike over today at a stop sign with my wife on back, neither of us hurt except for my ego and the embarrassment of hoisting the monster back up while several cars waited( pointing downhill at the stop sign, attempting to turn right onto the road that was inclined). Actually got help from a cager, which was greatly appreciated. Moving turns are fine, it's just the turns from a standing stop that seem awkward. Any tips that me, or my rider could benefit from would be greatly appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,165 Posts
One thing I taught my wife when we were riding was that she should always look over my shoulder on the INSIDE of a curve. That keeps our weight on the inside, and the bike does not have to lean as far. If the rider looks over the outside (high) shoulder, their weight shifts to the high side, and you have to lean the bike even further to make the turn. Also, if they are looking over the high shoulder, they may have a tendency to lean even further the wrong way, and you may end up leaning the bike so far to the inside that you start to drag something.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Markwk

·
Miles of Smiles
Joined
·
1,063 Posts
Welcome to the drop club Mark, and the best site to get answers to all your LT questions.
Regarding riding with passenger, lots of tips, but I guess the best is for her to sit still and always keep her feet on the pegs / boards.
I always plant both my feet on the tar when stopped.
Also the LT handles stationary drops really well. Other than scuffs mostly no damage. There is a very specific way to lift by yourself. "Search" on here is your friend.
eg. http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/k1200lt/2772-help-two-up-riding-slow-speeds.html
The LT is amazingly agile, but a challenge when riding slowly or stopped.
The telelever front suspension takes some getting used to, but when coming to a stop always ensure the wheel is straight.
Pulling away should be OK, she's very stable with throttle. Practice.
In fact, slow speed practice in an empty parking lot or such will always help.
With and without you pillion.
Enjoy the ride and this site.
Cheers
 
  • Like
Reactions: Markwk

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
367 Posts
1st place to check would be the FAQ part of the site (it is under navigation and also under the technical header). Then of course go to You tube and type in BMW K1200LT. Lots of useful info there. As you have just learned do not stop the bike with the front wheel turned as she likes to take naps. Good video's of how to pick her up without hurting yourself on this site and You Tube. Wonderful bike which will bring you many smiles. Welcome to the Forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
876 Posts
The highest risk activity on the LT is during stopping, that point where speed is very slow and balance is difficult, especially when 2 up. I always look for clean surfaces and level ground where posible. Chuck away any slippery soled boots and get something with plenty of grip, I use Rossi's made here in Oz, they have a polyeurethane work boot type sole.
Don't get off balance as the weight will quickly become too much to manage and you'll (both) hit the deck. Alway have both feet planted firmly. Concentration and practice is the key I think.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Markwk

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
414 Posts
The highest risk activity on the LT is during stopping, that point where speed is very slow and balance is difficult, especially when 2 up. I always look for clean surfaces and level ground where posible. Chuck away any slippery soled boots and get something with plenty of grip, I use Rossi's made here in Oz, they have a polyeurethane work boot type sole.
Don't get off balance as the weight will quickly become too much to manage and you'll (both) hit the deck. Alway have both feet planted firmly. Concentration and practice is the key I think.
+1

Pay attention to the pavement at intersections where you have to stop. Don't be in the center of the lane where the oil patches are and never stop where you will be planting your feet on paint, especially if the road is wet.
Make sure you are very comfortable on the bike solo before you take a passenger. Be familiar with your passengers attitude towards riding. Have they done a fair amount riding? Are they nervous or apprehensive?
Get on a good long smooth road with gentle sweeping curves to get a new rider comfortable with you and the bike before going on any fun rides.
These things apply to any bike, but special attention needs to be given to a large heavy bikes that are difficult at slow speeds. A nervous passenger that bounces around or squeezes the air out of you is an accident waiting to happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
787 Posts
Riding two up for 8 years 25K miles with wife never dropped it with her on. Doesn't mean I have not dropped the bike. Probably never dropped it with her on because I'm so afraid it would scare or hurt her and she would not want to ride again. So I always look and think ahead when stopping or turning. Take your time and do not rush things, I always ask her to get off bike as soon as I am stopped and ready to park the bike to minimize time the extra weight is on back when going slow, parking or stopped. I also told her when stopped sit dead still and do not move. I also told her if she sees me struggling to keep the bike upright to lean the opposite direction I'm starting to fall as quickly as she can (this method has not been tested yet). Also at off camber, uphill stops or any other difficult stop light or sign, I will roll through them if I can see traffic clearly. If you have to stop at an up hill intersection use your foot brake to hold the bike in place so your throttle hand is free. Use plenty of throttle to get her going as you do not want to stall because you will most likely go down on a stall. Also be aware of stopping on gravel surfaces or even patches of stone screenings on paved roads. If you take your time and carefully choose your actions you will be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,277 Posts
Get some sandbags and load the pillion seat to the weight of your passenger and get a feel for how the bike handles. It is much better to try it this way before you put a live human on the back.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Markwk and bfree

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I've owned an LT since 2003. It is a very top heavy bike. Once it gets moving it drives like a dream. Low speed it can be a handful. Things I do to avoid a drop (never in 12 years)
1) Be very gentle on the brakes at low speed. VERY VERY gentle.
2) Brake when front wheel is straight.
3) I paddle walk in parking lots most of the time.
4) Watch out for slippery footing whenever stopping
5) Double check side stand is locked before committing
5b) Make sure ground area is not depressed for side stand.
6) Make sure bike cannot roll forward and collapse side stand when parked
7) Aways have a sidestand pad available for parking in soft areas. Have a string on it to pull it out when getting ready to ride away.

Good luck!

The LT is a great bike.....amazing when it gets rolling. I kind of compare it to a good fighter jet. The best fighter jets need be unstable to turn quick. The LT is a bit unstable; That allows it to be more responsive at highway speed.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Markwk
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top