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Hi Jan,
Sorry to hear of your "off", to be honest, most people have an "unintended" off, during their riding career and I am pleased to see, that there is not a lot of damage to the RT, just our pride.
You new bike looks lovely by the way.
If you hadn't considered it, many of the local IAM RoadSmart or RoSPA Groups have a "taster day" or a "skills morning", where without joining or committment, you can just "rock-up" and take part in the day/morning.
Certainly, for the skills morning, it is worth considering, it will give you information about how the bike handles, how you can gain confidence riding it, both slowly(walking pace) and quicker, most Groups give riders the chance to practice correct braking techniques....
If you are up our way, (Gloucestershire) on 31/07 (0930hrs - 1330hrs), come up, have a brew and maybe a biscuit or two, as CCAM (Cheltenham & Cotswolds Advanced Motorcyclists) are running their skills morning
I wish you well with your bike and may see you on the road.... :cool:(y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Hi Jan,
Sorry to hear of your "off", to be honest, most people have an "unintended" off, during their riding career and I am pleased to see, that there is not a lot of damage to the RT, just our pride.
You new bike looks lovely by the way.
If you hadn't considered it, many of the local IAM RoadSmart or RoSPA Groups have a "taster day" or a "skills morning", where without joining or committment, you can just "rock-up" and take part in the day/morning.
Certainly, for the skills morning, it is worth considering, it will give you information about how the bike handles, how you can gain confidence riding it, both slowly(walking pace) and quicker, most Groups give riders the chance to practice correct braking techniques....
If you are up our way, (Gloucestershire) on 31/07 (0930hrs - 1330hrs), come up, have a brew and maybe a biscuit or two, as CCAM (Cheltenham & Cotswolds Advanced Motorcyclists) are running their skills morning
I wish you well with your bike and may see you on the road.... :cool:(y)
Hi GlosPolbiker,
As a 30,000 mile a year car driver I’ve always been interested in improving my abilities on the road. I will definitely visit on the 31st! I’ll also look into IAM and RoSPA. As the 2% or so on the road I’ve already experienced a total lack of consideration from other road users, that really don’t give a dam about motorcyclists (Especially taxis and white vans).
Thanks for the advice, I’m on it!
Warm regards,
Jan
 

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Apart from BikeSafe, which I run for Gloucestershire, (www.bikesafe.co.uk) I also run Biker Down! workshops, again for the Shire. Both IAM RoadSmart and RoSPA are very similar, it’s always best to “go along” and see which Group offers you the best for what you would like.

Biker Down! workshops are FREE, if you’re available the first workshop is on Friday 25th at 1800hrs, if you send an e-mail to [email protected] I’ll send you some details back, if you would like to know? It’s basically split into 3 parts, the first, an hour dealing with, what to do at a crash scene, how to stay safe etc, the 2nd part, 90 mins is about realistic First Aid at a scene, catastrophic bleeding, how to deal with it, helmet removal and CPR, the last hour is dealing with SMIDSY’s, why they happen and how we can combat them. The offer is there if you wish Jan…… 😎🏍👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Apart from BikeSafe, which I run for Gloucestershire, (www.bikesafe.co.uk) I also run Biker Down! workshops, again for the Shire. Both IAM RoadSmart and RoSPA are very similar, it’s always best to “go along” and see which Group offers you the best for what you would like.

Biker Down! workshops are FREE, if you’re available the first workshop is on Friday 25th at 1800hrs, if you send an e-mail to [email protected] I’ll send you some details back, if you would like to know? It’s basically split into 3 parts, the first, an hour dealing with, what to do at a crash scene, how to stay safe etc, the 2nd part, 90 mins is about realistic First Aid at a scene, catastrophic bleeding, how to deal with it, helmet removal and CPR, the last hour is dealing with SMIDSY’s, why they happen and how we can combat them. The offer is there if you wish Jan…… 😎🏍👍
I’m on the BikeSafe reserve list. I’ll definitely email regarding Biker Down!
Thanks a Million!
Jan
😎👍
 

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Hi GlosPolbiker,
As a 30,000 mile a year car driver I’ve always been interested in improving my abilities on the road.
Warm regards,
Jan
That's remarkable the very light damage your new beauty sustained--the repair will be less than the cost of crash bars it would appear.

I had a long period of not riding, 28y, so at age 61y read up on all sorts of things to insure a better return to riding experience including perusing various tales of woe re low/no speed drops here and elsewhere. When I bought my new '16 RT I made an inventory of the best tips, and vowed to try to follow them always, as if someone had made me an offer something like this: "If you never tip over your bike while you own it I'll give you $1,000,000!" So far, at 5y and 49,000m, I've not come close, and hope to keep it that way. I know, that sounds a bit brazen, but in the end it's 100% operator error that brings about the conditions for a low/no speed drop, IMO. Of course, that error can be out of your control, for example if you have attention deficits, or a medical incident, etc.

Habitualize these and it may help you avoid future repairs and embarrassment:
  1. When getting on and off the bike, apply the front brake first to help prevent any unexpected movement of the bike.
  2. Before commencing to get off the bike FIRST look down at the kickstand to make sure it's fully deployed. Got this story from someone who was excited to be home on his Goldwing after a long tour, failed to insure the stand was fully out and off she went.
  3. When it's time to park, take the effort to find a reasonably low risk spot to park: make sure you visualize your exit before selecting the spot to make sure it's easily managed in terms of debris, slope, proximity to obstacles, etc. Sometimes that might mean parking a block away from where you'd rather be, and that's your choice of course
  4. As you are preparing to leave a parking spot, before getting on the bike, take a second to look ahead and especially behind you if you need to back up at all, so that you are fully aware of the presence of debris, oil, etc anywhere you will find yourself during that egress.
  5. When coming to a stop insure the steering is straight forward, i.e., not turned, as able.
  6. When coming to a full stop transition to the rear brake only, but just for the least few yards is all. As we know the front brake does the lion's share of braking, and despite having linked brakes on your bike, offloading to the rear will help reduce the risk of a tip over if you were not successful in keeping the steering fully straight, or if you were too aggressive in applying the front brake.
  7. When launching from a dead stop give the bike ample revs so as to never stall the engine. A stall w/ a turned wheel is a setup for a tipover.
  8. Practice low-speed handling tricks: slip the clutch as needed, apply rear brake, etc when doing for example a u-turn.
  9. When doing u-turns only attempt them on flat surfaces, more or less. The more slope, the more your low speed handling skills need to be. Find a better place to do a u-turn if you're not 100% confident you can manage the turn. Don't be afraid to use your legs as outriggers--it might not help you pass the basic rider course but beats the heck out of dropping the bike.
  10. If you find the surface below you is not grippy enough, keep your feet and toes pointing inwards so pressure is applied downwards versus outwards so you don't lose the grip you have. Good soles help of course.
  11. Finally, commit to the idea that a low/no speed drop IS NOT inevitable. Not having that belief will set you up for the next drop.
In my 49K miles I did have a collision w/ a cyclist. As I was nearing the top of an incline on a 2 lane undivided road posted at 50 mph, the cyclist was in a group of 4 or so riders off the road to my right, stopped, except the lead cyclist decided to use his small helmet mounted mirror to look behind him to decide if he could swing a wide u-turn. He didn't see me coming up the ascent, made the turn immediately before me all the way into my lane and the double yellow line, giving me a moment only to brake and swerve enough to miss him directly, and grazed him w/ the right mirror on my RT. This cracked his $10K bike frame, gave him some soft tissue injury and a compression fracture in his spine. I fortunately did not go down, though the mirror popped off, and I was able to put it back on at the scene. Despite our best efforts it's a risky activity for sure!

Best Wishes on your new ride it's absolute best in class as a fully featured sport tourer w/ a reasonable curb weight. I hope to keep mine until I'm done riding as there really isn't a better ride. I would be tempted away only for a bike w/ identical features at 100lbs less or so, as I age. There are ample compromised lighter models, but none that can match what RT offers for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
That's remarkable the very light damage your new beauty sustained--the repair will be less than the cost of crash bars it would appear.

I had a long period of not riding, 28y, so at age 61y read up on all sorts of things to insure a better return to riding experience including perusing various tales of woe re low/no speed drops here and elsewhere. When I bought my new '16 RT I made an inventory of the best tips, and vowed to try to follow them always, as if someone had made me an offer something like this: "If you never tip over your bike while you own it I'll give you $1,000,000!" So far, at 5y and 49,000m, I've not come close, and hope to keep it that way. I know, that sounds a bit brazen, but in the end it's 100% operator error that brings about the conditions for a low/no speed drop, IMO. Of course, that error can be out of your control, for example if you have attention deficits, or a medical incident, etc.

Habitualize these and it may help you avoid future repairs and embarrassment:
  1. When getting on and off the bike, apply the front brake first to help prevent any unexpected movement of the bike.
  2. Before commencing to get off the bike FIRST look down at the kickstand to make sure it's fully deployed. Got this story from someone who was excited to be home on his Goldwing after a long tour, failed to insure the stand was fully out and off she went.
  3. When it's time to park, take the effort to find a reasonably low risk spot to park: make sure you visualize your exit before selecting the spot to make sure it's easily managed in terms of debris, slope, proximity to obstacles, etc. Sometimes that might mean parking a block away from where you'd rather be, and that's your choice of course
  4. As you are preparing to leave a parking spot, before getting on the bike, take a second to look ahead and especially behind you if you need to back up at all, so that you are fully aware of the presence of debris, oil, etc anywhere you will find yourself during that egress.
  5. When coming to a stop insure the steering is straight forward, i.e., not turned, as able.
  6. When coming to a full stop transition to the rear brake only, but just for the least few yards is all. As we know the front brake does the lion's share of braking, and despite having linked brakes on your bike, offloading to the rear will help reduce the risk of a tip over if you were not successful in keeping the steering fully straight, or if you were too aggressive in applying the front brake.
  7. When launching from a dead stop give the bike ample revs so as to never stall the engine. A stall w/ a turned wheel is a setup for a tipover.
  8. Practice low-speed handling tricks: slip the clutch as needed, apply rear brake, etc when doing for example a u-turn.
  9. When doing u-turns only attempt them on flat surfaces, more or less. The more slope, the more your low speed handling skills need to be. Find a better place to do a u-turn if you're not 100% confident you can manage the turn. Don't be afraid to use your legs as outriggers--it might not help you pass the basic rider course but beats the heck out of dropping the bike.
  10. If you find the surface below you is not grippy enough, keep your feet and toes pointing inwards so pressure is applied downwards versus outwards so you don't lose the grip you have. Good soles help of course.
  11. Finally, commit to the idea that a low/no speed drop IS NOT inevitable. Not having that belief will set you up for the next drop.
In my 49K miles I did have a collision w/ a cyclist. As I was nearing the top of an incline on a 2 lane undivided road posted at 50 mph, the cyclist was in a group of 4 or so riders off the road to my right, stopped, except the lead cyclist decided to use his small helmet mounted mirror to look behind him to decide if he could swing a wide u-turn. He didn't see me coming up the ascent, made the turn immediately before me all the way into my lane and the double yellow line, giving me a moment only to brake and swerve enough to miss him directly, and grazed him w/ the right mirror on my RT. This cracked his $10K bike frame, gave him some soft tissue injury and a compression fracture in his spine. I fortunately did not go down, though the mirror popped off, and I was able to put it back on at the scene. Despite our best efforts it's a risky activity for sure!

Best Wishes on your new ride it's absolute best in class as a fully featured sport tourer w/ a reasonable curb weight. I hope to keep mine until I'm done riding as there really isn't a better ride. I would be tempted away only for a bike w/ identical features at 100lbs less or so, as I age. There are ample compromised lighter models, but none that can match what RT offers for me.
Dear NoelCP,
There is an amazing amount of learning in your message, and I really appreciate you sharing! As you say, getting into a routine and using a tested method is the key.
I will incorporate your suggestions, especially number 6. As someone previously said, I can’t have grabbed the front brake, as I believe they are linked, although I was taught to use the clutch and rear brake only at very low speeds. I think my head just wasn’t in the right place. I now cannot work out how I managed to drop it, nerves I think! I am going to complete additional training as I want to prepare for future adventures.
If you have time, could you add a picture of your RT? I love anything with an engine!
Again, thank you for the detailed advice! I will make sure your time and effort isn’t wasted on me.
Warm regards,
Jan
 

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Dear NoelCP,
There is an amazing amount of learning in your message, and I really appreciate you sharing! As you say, getting into a routine and using a tested method is the key.
It's not unlike the checklist pilot's use to insure they don't overlook something. It's often the little omissions at the wrong time that can result in a bad outcome so yes develop a great routine you can count on. One thing we have the most control over is our attention, hopefully, and so using that to the max can certainly go a long ways to keep things going well. Thankfully riding a heavier bike does not require strength, just attention and balance.

Not that you're seeking advice, but a few other things gleaned from those more experienced than me are real pearls for me:
  1. Keep your vision out a ways--well out, and use peripheral vision and scanning as required for the near field. IOW, you want no surprises wherever possible, so you have time to react.
  2. Keep maximum distance between you and other motorvehicles as able, always, IOW be an 'active' rider always looking to manage risk downwards.
  3. When passing other passable traffic, approach to a comfortable/safe distance (2 seconds or whatever seems right), then swing well wide and accelerate fast so the time your proximity is in the hazard zone is minimized. After all, that driver could intentionally swerve to hit you God forbid but it happens, or have a stroke and suddenly veer off course, etc.
  4. Consider side-side swerve as you approach an intersection w/ traffic poised to ingress, to increase conspicuity. My guess is that will be at least as effective as expensive lighting is.
  5. When traveling on wildlife-prone areas (dogs too!) ride wherever in the lane will SAFELY afford you the most TIME to make an adjustment as needed, which usually is hard braking, versus swerving, which can destablize in the event of a collision. Here's a photo of where my older brother struck a good size deer in Wyoming: the deer bolted out from the bushes on the right, just past my motorcycle which is parked on the left side of the road in the photo. He hit hte deer directly, and thankfully walked away w/ very minor injuries. Since this event I make it a habit, wherever possible to position myself for maximum time to react. The day this happened we were in the leftmost section of the right lane, nearer the yellow line. As you can see there is completely unobstructed views on the left side of this road, whereas on the right side intermittent bushes and so forth. Now, I would be riding all the way to the left side of the left lane in the photo, as it's a long straitaway and there is no oncoming traffic. For these events fractions of a second can matter. We were going about 58mph at the time of the collision.

His new Yamaha FJR1300-ES did not fair so well:


Enough said--I'm stuck at home trying to shake bad Norovirus infection and my RT is in transit to my place in Colorado, so blathering on helps. Enjoy your new ride and you're smart to think about picking up an air vest. I'm not that smart so I haven't yet, but keep trying to convince myself to do so!

Not my RT, but mine's identical--and still looks and runs as new:
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
It's not unlike the checklist pilot's use to insure they don't overlook something. It's often the little omissions at the wrong time that can result in a bad outcome so yes develop a great routine you can count on. One thing we have the most control over is our attention, hopefully, and so using that to the max can certainly go a long ways to keep things going well. Thankfully riding a heavier bike does not require strength, just attention and balance.

Not that you're seeking advice, but a few other things gleaned from those more experienced than me are real pearls for me:
  1. Keep your vision out a ways--well out, and use peripheral vision and scanning as required for the near field. IOW, you want no surprises wherever possible, so you have time to react.
  2. Keep maximum distance between you and other motorvehicles as able, always, IOW be an 'active' rider always looking to manage risk downwards.
  3. When passing other passable traffic, approach to a comfortable/safe distance (2 seconds or whatever seems right), then swing well wide and accelerate fast so the time your proximity is in the hazard zone is minimized. After all, that driver could intentionally swerve to hit you God forbid but it happens, or have a stroke and suddenly veer off course, etc.
  4. Consider side-side swerve as you approach an intersection w/ traffic poised to ingress, to increase conspicuity. My guess is that will be at least as effective as expensive lighting is.
  5. When traveling on wildlife-prone areas (dogs too!) ride wherever in the lane will SAFELY afford you the most TIME to make an adjustment as needed, which usually is hard braking, versus swerving, which can destablize in the event of a collision. Here's a photo of where my older brother struck a good size deer in Wyoming: the deer bolted out from the bushes on the right, just past my motorcycle which is parked on the left side of the road in the photo. He hit hte deer directly, and thankfully walked away w/ very minor injuries. Since this event I make it a habit, wherever possible to position myself for maximum time to react. The day this happened we were in the leftmost section of the right lane, nearer the yellow line. As you can see there is completely unobstructed views on the left side of this road, whereas on the right side intermittent bushes and so forth. Now, I would be riding all the way to the left side of the left lane in the photo, as it's a long straitaway and there is no oncoming traffic. For these events fractions of a second can matter. We were going about 58mph at the time of the collision.

His new Yamaha FJR1300-ES did not fair so well:


Enough said--I'm stuck at home trying to shake bad Norovirus infection and my RT is in transit to my place in Colorado, so blathering on helps. Enjoy your new ride and you're smart to think about picking up an air vest. I'm not that smart so I haven't yet, but keep trying to convince myself to do so!

Not my RT, but mine's identical--and still looks and runs as new:
Dear NoelCP,
Thank you so very much! I’m taking the day off work Friday, as the weather is good, and I want to practice.
I love the colour of your RT.
I had two Yamaha Grizzly 700’s (one after another) and I hear Colorado is the place to own one! Amazing views!
Get well soon, and please keep in touch.
Warm regards,
Jan
 

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Probably won't make you feel any better but I did the same thing with my 4 hour old MG Le Mans in London, 1978. Never forgot it! Bizarrely, fell on the left side, cracked / broke the RIGHT side spark plug. And dented the bloody tank. Still miss that bike...
 

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I haven't been around the forum for a long time now, so I may as well get yelled at now.
For whatever reason, I believe that it's the narrowness of the bars coupled with all the fuel up high that makes the RT want to roll to the side on front brake stops. I just got used to it.
Anyhow glad all is ok besides your pride. But honestly everyone drops one sooner or later.
 

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Well folks,
I collected My new 2021 RT today, proud as punch! BUT, if I didn’t tell the truth to you all:
a. I wouldn’t be honest!
b. I’d be a bigger d*ck than I actually am
c. My wife would tell you anyway!

Then at the first traffic lights, with nobody in front, missed my imagery stopping point, and for no reason touched the front brake (why??) and over I went!

I’d been emptying the attic and for the last two days had a bad back, but the embarrassment and adrenaline meant I lifted the 288Kg plus weight in a flash...worst still the bike called SOS and I had to tell the bloke... ‘it’s OK, I’ve just dropped the bike!’

Then I was riding for the next hour with no issues, apart from my red face!

When I arrived home my wife reminded me that if she’d done the same I’d be banging on at her....which is about right! I told her it was bound to happen sometime, and probably won’t be the last time it happens?! Only a few little scratches, and luckily not on the aluminium or View attachment 173675 View attachment 173676 View attachment 173677 paintwork! View attachment 173675
My wife did also remind me that I should have bought something ‘smaller’....but there you go!
Take care everyone!

Jan
Sounds familiar except HE dropped my new 1200GS the day we collected it - putting it away in the garage for me!!!
 

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Ok, so I showed this tread to my wife and she just had to dob me in!!

I "lent" her brand new GS against the garage wall whilst trying to put it on it's centre stand, it just got away from me.

Value cover and mirror damaged along with any cred I thought I had. 😵
 
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