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  Topic Review (Newest First)
Nov 10th, 2006 2:13 pm
meese Forget the tire irons and get a No-Mar Mount/Demount Bar. Much easier to use and won't scratch your rims. If you don't have a tire changing stand, then at least consider the No-Mar SpoonBars which have a protective teflon pad built in. One tire change will pay for it, trust me.
Nov 10th, 2006 11:20 am
mistral Where are you guys getting the metal stems? Also any good source for tire irons? I jiust bought a Marc Parnes balancer and I am doing my tires when it is time.

Thanks.

Ron
Nov 9th, 2006 5:34 pm
HarvRead
Tire Change

Craig's advice is excellent IF you intend to keep using replacable (soft) valve stems. I switched to the steel kind, gasket inside, gasket and nut outside. No more problems, they will probably last longer than I will.
Nov 9th, 2006 10:59 am
c00k1e an ozzy company near me sells tyre changing kit for off road bikes - to take with them for the Paris-Dakar race. He says you have to fit a compressor on the bike to get the beads to snap back into place.
Is this true?
Or would a normal 12v tire pump do the trick?
Nov 9th, 2006 9:47 am
Lynn_Keen I have the NO-MAR changer. It's similiar to the Harbor Freight but much more heave duty and is designed specifically to prevent scratching the rims. Of course it's also a bunch more expensive but I solved that problem by splitting the cost with friend. It is still certainly an effort to change tires but the NO-Mar works quite well. I've also used the Harbor Freight changer at the MSF School where I work and it to does the job. However, the LT tires are a bunch tougher than the tires on the 250cc bikes at the school and my freind and I decided that the NO-Mar would be worth the extra bucks and we've not regretted our decision.
Nov 8th, 2006 6:29 pm
ksailor Check out the Tech Article "Tire changin with Harbor Freight changer" on this site before you buy. It features Harbor Freight tire changer w/motorcycle adapter and the Marc Parnes balancer.

Good Luck
Nov 8th, 2006 6:23 pm
Jinks There are several good ways to change your tires Ron. Here's mine:

I have a Harbour Freight changer, but no mount/demount bar. If you use tire irons you don't need the motorcycle adapter, but the adapter will be useful if you get a mount/demount bar.

With tire irons I recommend a set of rim protectors, & two or three good long tire irons. The Harbour Freight unit will provide you with a bead breaker, & get the wheel/tire assembly up where you can remove the old tire without straining your back.

For installing the new tire I recommend a square frame of 4 X 4's covered with some carpet scraps. Make the frame large enough to support the wheel & allow the brake rotor to fit in the center. Purchase a good quality rubber mallet with a fiberglass or steel handle. You install the new tire by hitting the bead with the mallet & driving it over the rim. Sounds complicated, but after a couple of tires it's quick & easy. Use a little dish soap in some water as a lubricant. Be conservative, you want to lubricate but not leave a lot of water in the tire.

I use a Marc Pharnes balancer because it's reasonably priced, will work with BMW & any other wheels I've come across. I balance the wheel first without the tire & mark the heavy spot (it's not always the valve stem). Mount the tire, & rebalance. You can buy weights at most bike shops & NAPA, they're cheap.

Because the LT is a distance machine I keep a spare rear wheel. I mount a new tire on that wheel, & when I'm going any distance I use that tire/wheel. For local riding I use the tire/wheel with the most wear. That way I maximize my tire usage.
Nov 8th, 2006 6:02 pm
dshealey
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motomadman
Just replaced front tire today ME880 for $95 with free mount and balance. Shop around, I found this deal at my local Honda dealer....Make damn sure you replace your whole valve stem at each tire change. Had mine blew out the whole metal insert not long after a tire change.....My 2 cents.....
Next time put in metal stems, won't have to worry about them for years.
Nov 8th, 2006 5:46 pm
Motomadman Just replaced front tire today ME880 for $95 with free mount and balance. Shop around, I found this deal at my local Honda dealer....Make damn sure you replace your whole valve stem at each tire change. Had mine blew out the whole metal insert not long after a tire change.....My 2 cents.....
Nov 8th, 2006 4:55 pm
Sunderland If you end up going with the Harbor Freight setup, it is wise to purchase the Wicko mount/demount bar (part# MC100-14C) http://www.wikco.biz/Accessories.htm to eliminate scratching your wheels.
Nov 8th, 2006 3:45 pm
BLBantz So is this tire changer for $49 and the motorcycle adapter for another $49 all I need to change a tire? I guess I need a balancer ($69) and some weights too but I thought it would be much more expensive than this. How difficult is it to change a tire? It seems that one tire change could pay for itself. Thanks.
Nov 8th, 2006 3:12 pm
JMMRoad
Quote:
Originally Posted by ez_rdr55
Ron,

I've always used good tire irons and just did purchase a Marc Parnes balancer.
I get the cheapest leather work gloves from Home Depot to cover the tire irons and protect the rims. I use WD-40 or Goop for lub. A friend of mine uses the Harbor Freight changer, but after watching him I will stay with good old tire irons.
I agree. I have been changing tires with tire irons only for years without problems. I use dishwashing soap diluted with an equal amount of water for lube. It takes a couple of really good tire irons. Mine are 15 inches long. I also use a couple of the short tire irons that used to come with BMW's. I also use a homemade jig that simply consists of a piece of plywood about 2 feet square to which I attached two layers of 2x4 forming a square of sufficient size to allow the brake rotor to set in the square protected from contact and provide a stable base to lever the tire off.

I do not use any rim protectors and have caused very little dinging of the rims.

I use a balancer that is similar to yours that I have had for 15 years or so. Works fine.

It's a hard job but the combination of cost savings, independance associated with changing tires on your schedule and the satisfaction to doing it yourself is well worth it in my opinion.

Jerry
Nov 8th, 2006 2:45 pm
lnowell
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronlray
I don't know about you guys but I'm tired of paying $225 for a ME880 rear tire installed at the BMW dealer, not to mention the 200 miles there and back!
I had a new set of tires put on for $440 bucks only to get a nail in the rear tire a week later! $%#^#!! Anyway, can anyone lead me to a link or name of a good, reasonably priced heavy duty tire changing setup and balancer? I'm sure it would save me at least $75 a wheel every time I change a tire. As Anthony Hopkins said in the movie "The Edge", " If one man can do it...another man can do it!" I am that other man! thanks, Ron Ray
I was once quoted $285.00 for a new rear ME880 from a dealer. I told him I did not need for them to come get my bike and deliver it back to me (120 mile one way). Turned out that was not what the dealer had in mind. So - we do the changes ourselves - which is no big deal. The one thing I do like about changing our own tires is the fact that we can take as long as we want or need to balance them right - which I know is WAY longer than any paid installer could or would take.
Nov 8th, 2006 1:35 pm
johnrehder
I have had

the Harbor Freight MC tire changer for three years now and I love saving money on tire changes. I bought a slightly more expensive balancer (200.00) which sits right on top of the changer and clamps into place. I have three tie irons because the big bar that came with the tire changer is too hard to use IMHO. The tire irons work just as well. I also buy self adhesvice weights from Patchboy.com so $210.00 for two tires delivered from SW motosports and I'm all set. I can change them on my own schedule which is the best part.Try it you'll like it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ronlray
I don't know about you guys but I'm tired of paying $225 for a ME880 rear tire installed at the BMW dealer, not to mention the 200 miles there and back!
I had a new set of tires put on for $440 bucks only to get a nail in the rear tire a week later! $%#^#!! Anyway, can anyone lead me to a link or name of a good, reasonably priced heavy duty tire changing setup and balancer? I'm sure it would save me at least $75 a wheel every time I change a tire. As Anthony Hopkins said in the movie "The Edge", " If one man can do it...another man can do it!" I am that other man! thanks, Ron Ray
Nov 8th, 2006 11:33 am
Dochatley http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=42927

This will take you to the Harbor Freight changer and also show you the other part necessary for the complete changer. Not too expensive and will save the back some work.
Nov 8th, 2006 11:08 am
JATownsend
No Mar...

I feel the same way. This is looking good to me! Others on the site have said good things about the No-Mar as well.

Check out their video demos...
Nov 8th, 2006 8:38 am
ez_rdr55
Changing tires

Ron,

I've always used good tire irons and just did purchase a Marc Parnes balancer.
I get the cheapest leather work gloves from Home Depot to cover the tire irons and protect the rims. I use WD-40 or Goop for lub. A friend of mine uses the Harbor Freight changer, but after watching him I will stay with good old tire irons.
Nov 8th, 2006 8:27 am
ronlray
Tire changing equipment-help requested

I don't know about you guys but I'm tired of paying $225 for a ME880 rear tire installed at the BMW dealer, not to mention the 200 miles there and back!
I had a new set of tires put on for $440 bucks only to get a nail in the rear tire a week later! $%#^#!! Anyway, can anyone lead me to a link or name of a good, reasonably priced heavy duty tire changing setup and balancer? I'm sure it would save me at least $75 a wheel every time I change a tire. As Anthony Hopkins said in the movie "The Edge", " If one man can do it...another man can do it!" I am that other man! thanks, Ron Ray

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