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  Topic Review (Newest First)
Sep 12th, 2006 9:28 pm
Montycs Having tried what the book says and laying the bike over in the garage, I now lower the kick stand before I put the bike on the center stand, left foot on the flat part and a lift up on the hand grip. rolls right on. When I want to leave, I make sure the stand is down then rock forward and the bike comes off the center stand with no problems. I also keep the brakes engaged to prevent rolling away. I have a 32" inseam so it is pretty easy for me, plus thick soles on my boots help. Be sure to raise the side stand before engaging the tranny!
Sep 12th, 2006 3:08 pm
rjhammetter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick
Although the booklet sez NOT to sit on the bike with the centerstand (nor the sidestand) deployed, that's ed zachery what I do. No way am I gonna follow the booklets instructions - stand beside the bike and hold the handlebar grip with left hand; hold lifting handle with right hand; push the motorcycle forward off the stand! No sir - not me. I climb aboard and rock it forward with both feet on the ground.
Same here. I tried rocking it off while standing on the side the first time I had it on the CS and I nearly lost it falling to the side away from me. Never again. I'm 6'0" so rocking it off while sitting is ok
Sep 12th, 2006 1:25 pm
wjhanna
New centerstand problem

I did a search already and found nothing so, I'll pose the question. I have an '05 LT, with about 8K miles on her and have had no problems except the OEM tires came underinflated and getting only 6K miles on the front. Last night, I went to use the hydraulic center stand and got nothing except the dash indicator light (flashing) and it did not deploy. Everything else was done normally, no brake, bike in neutral, no sidestand down, proper alignment, etc. Anybody have a "look here first" suggestion? Can't ask any of my Harley friends for obvious reasons. . .
Sep 12th, 2006 1:13 pm
UltraLT
Center Stand

OK, I'm a new LT owner. 05. I always get amuzed looks from people when using the hydraulic system in a parking lot of other brand bikes. I was told by everyone I know who has an LT and the dealer, not, I say again, NOT to use the side stand if I can at all avoid it. Why, if on the side stand for any length of time, oil seeps into the cylinders, somehow, and you get a real smoky start when you get going again. I have found this to be true, so I use the centerstand everytime it is appropriate.

Now I have a question. I had to take a sick friends LT home for him from his work parking lot. It was an older LT and has a manual center stand. I was afraid of dropping his bike, and was unable to figure out how to put it on the manual center stand. So how is that done?

Ultra LT
Sep 12th, 2006 12:09 pm
stefeb
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhendy
After much huffing and puffing, sweating, and cussing I have wondered which is worse, the embarrassment from the blue smoke from my "fancy new toy" enveloping my neighborhood or not being able to get my bike off the centerstand ... with poise and dignity.

hmmmm...

Just tonight I think figured it out.

1. Park in the garage.
2. Close the garage door so no one can see.
3. Get on the bike -- accepting that your 29" legs are not going to touch the ground, much less provide stability if it topples (thus the closed door).
4. Pull in the clutch and leave the brake alone -- pulling in the brake only stops forward momentum.
5. Rock back and foward until it rolls off the centerstand. Hopefully the wall will stop the bike -- if not, don't worry, the door was closed.

As long as I do not touch the brakes, it seems to roll forward ok.

On my GW, I actually gave up -- I only put it on its centerstand after I make sure I have help getting it off. Very uncool to not be able to get it off after picking a chick to "take for a ride".
30" inseam here, and I do the same thing (in the garage).

I must look like a kid on a rocking horse. I'm getting better though. Usually, two rocks is all it takes, and I'm ready to ride.
Sep 12th, 2006 9:25 am
Mopos
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhendy
After much huffing and puffing, sweating, and cussing I have wondered which is worse, the embarrassment from the blue smoke from my "fancy new toy" enveloping my neighborhood or not being able to get my bike off the centerstand ... with poise and dignity.

hmmmm...

Just tonight I think figured it out.

1. Park in the garage.
2. Close the garage door so no one can see.
3. Get on the bike -- accepting that your 29" legs are not going to touch the ground, much less provide stability if it topples (thus the closed door).
4. Pull in the clutch and leave the brake alone -- pulling in the brake only stops forward momentum.
5. Rock back and foward until it rolls off the centerstand. Hopefully the wall will stop the bike -- if not, don't worry, the door was closed.

As long as I do not touch the brakes, it seems to roll forward ok.

On my GW, I actually gave up -- I only put it on its centerstand after I make sure I have help getting it off. Very uncool to not be able to get it off after picking a chick to "take for a ride".
RE: #4 - pulling the brake should also stop backwards movement too!
Sep 12th, 2006 8:51 am
Dick Reminds me of a suggestion I received way back when!! If you're short of inseam, take your boots to a boot cobbler and have them resole the boots using thicker, and skid-resistant soles. Not all motorcycle boots will allow a resole, nor will all cobblers wanna tackle the job on m/c boots - sure doesn't hurt to ask. I did a pair of Oxnars that way, and also a pair of dress Justin Ropers. Can't recall the name of the sole maker, butt I think starts with a "V". (Only problem with the Ropers is the pointy toe - takes getting used to, butt I don't wear 'em too often anymore. Form over fashion, ya know!!)

Anyway, I'm thankful for the suggestion, as it helped me gain confidence in handling ole Toad. YMMV.


Quote:
Originally Posted by dhendy
After much huffing and puffing, sweating, and cussing I have wondered which is worse, the embarrassment from the blue smoke from my "fancy new toy" enveloping my neighborhood or not being able to get my bike off the centerstand ... with poise and dignity.

hmmmm...

Just tonight I think figured it out.

1. Park in the garage.
2. Close the garage door so no one can see.
3. Get on the bike -- accepting that your 29" legs are not going to touch the ground, much less provide stability if it topples (thus the closed door).
4. Pull in the clutch and leave the brake alone -- pulling in the brake only stops forward momentum.
5. Rock back and foward until it rolls off the centerstand. Hopefully the wall will stop the bike -- if not, don't worry, the door was closed.

As long as I do not touch the brakes, it seems to roll forward ok.

On my GW, I actually gave up -- I only put it on its centerstand after I make sure I have help getting it off. Very uncool to not be able to get it off after picking a chick to "take for a ride".
Sep 12th, 2006 1:39 am
dhendy
I think I figured it out today

After much huffing and puffing, sweating, and cussing I have wondered which is worse, the embarrassment from the blue smoke from my "fancy new toy" enveloping my neighborhood or not being able to get my bike off the centerstand ... with poise and dignity.

hmmmm...

Just tonight I think figured it out.

1. Park in the garage.
2. Close the garage door so no one can see.
3. Get on the bike -- accepting that your 29" legs are not going to touch the ground, much less provide stability if it topples (thus the closed door).
4. Pull in the clutch and leave the brake alone -- pulling in the brake only stops forward momentum.
5. Rock back and foward until it rolls off the centerstand. Hopefully the wall will stop the bike -- if not, don't worry, the door was closed.

As long as I do not touch the brakes, it seems to roll forward ok.

On my GW, I actually gave up -- I only put it on its centerstand after I make sure I have help getting it off. Very uncool to not be able to get it off after picking a chick to "take for a ride".
Sep 11th, 2006 9:19 pm
K-ration Being a new LT owner I too wrestled the bike for 2 minutes in the garage trying to dislodge the beast from its lofty perch. During a cool down period I came up with a solution. I stood on the appropriate side, left hand on left grip, tranny in neutral, right hand pulling the grab bar, but this time I put my left leg just behind and in contact with the driver foot peg. Pull up on grab bar, leverage bike with left leg pushing against back of foot peg. Walla, it fall gently to the ground and in control.
Sep 11th, 2006 5:18 pm
charlieg Although I find it easier to get her off while standing I quite often do it while sitting and find this technic more comfortable. If I am the slightest bit uphill I do have to teeter-todder her backward first, then heave her forward to get her off. -Chuck-
Sep 11th, 2006 3:24 pm
simoncharles David,
Thanks for clearing that point up.
I had imagined that it was so.
Simon
Sep 11th, 2006 2:55 pm
dshealey
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tat_n_Telle
With all the reports of drops or near-drops when coming off the centerstand, I have to ask: Why does one use the foolish thing at all? I have to admit that I have NEVER used the centerstand for normal parking of the bike. I've always used the sidestand - it's just normal for me, as all my previous bikes only had sidestands. I will always try to park on a slight uphill, and if I can't, the bike gets shut off in first gear and I use engine compression to keep it from rolling forward off the stand.
I just had new tires installed this past Saturday at the dealer, and when I went to pick the bike up, it was parked on the centerstand. I had to ask the dealer tech to get if off the stand, since I had no idea how to do it, and didn't feel like laying it on it's side there in the parking lot.
I always parked my LT on the centerstand. I only used the sidestand when getting off the bike, then immediately put it on the centerstand. I felt the centerstand was a lot more stable to leave the bike on when I walked away from it.
Sep 11th, 2006 2:29 pm
Tat_n_Telle
I just don't get it!

With all the reports of drops or near-drops when coming off the centerstand, I have to ask: Why does one use the foolish thing at all? I have to admit that I have NEVER used the centerstand for normal parking of the bike. I've always used the sidestand - it's just normal for me, as all my previous bikes only had sidestands. I will always try to park on a slight uphill, and if I can't, the bike gets shut off in first gear and I use engine compression to keep it from rolling forward off the stand.
I just had new tires installed this past Saturday at the dealer, and when I went to pick the bike up, it was parked on the centerstand. I had to ask the dealer tech to get if off the stand, since I had no idea how to do it, and didn't feel like laying it on it's side there in the parking lot.
Sep 11th, 2006 1:36 pm
space_coast_lt
Can't reach the ground sitting on the bike, so..

I make sure the side stand is down and the gear box is in 1st, then use the left handlebar grip and lifting handle to push her forward until she comes off the center stand. Its a piece of cake.

On the other hand, if I forget to put the side stand down, I have to hold her up while I put the stand down, and that is a little tricky. Also, if I forget to put her in 1st, she will try to just roll away on me, and that isn't fun, either.

Jeff
Sep 11th, 2006 11:50 am
dshealey
Quote:
Originally Posted by simoncharles
Just to make things clear, are we talking hydraulic centre-stand or normal ?.,
BOTH. The hydraulic centerstand only works hydraulically putting the bike ON the centerstand. They both have to be pushed off of it the same way.
Sep 11th, 2006 11:20 am
simoncharles Just to make things clear, are we talking hydraulic centre-stand or normal ?.,
Sep 11th, 2006 10:39 am
ibbones
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mopos
I simply hop on the bike, fire her up and IMEDATLY red-line the bike. I scoot my butt on to the passenger seat, and put hit in 1st. Then I drop the clutch. BAM! Smoke and howling, she pops off the stand. I can usually get her slowed down and under control in about 15 feet or so. It always takes a few feet before I can get back into the front seat. At this point, I will start putting on my safety gear - eye protection. I have thought about maybe wearing something like shoes, but so far the clogs have not slipped off my feet while using this technique.
I would say very funny but I have done that when I was a teen on a Honda CB650 Custom, except I already had my safety tennis shoes on.!!!
Sep 11th, 2006 9:45 am
Mopos
different technique

I simply hop on the bike, fire her up and IMEDATLY red-line the bike. I scoot my butt on to the passenger seat, and put hit in 1st. Then I drop the clutch. BAM! Smoke and howling, she pops off the stand. I can usually get her slowed down and under control in about 15 feet or so. It always takes a few feet before I can get back into the front seat. At this point, I will start putting on my safety gear - eye protection. I have thought about maybe wearing something like shoes, but so far the clogs have not slipped off my feet while using this technique.








Legal disclaimer : Uh, if you are dumb enough to believe this, then you should probably NOT be riding a motorcycle in the first place. I am not sure if that really is much of a disclaimer, what I am trying to say is, don't believe anything that I just wrote above.
Sep 11th, 2006 9:30 am
JPSpen
I agree,,,BUT

I've had several occasions when I couldn't get the bike off the center stand that way... On a slight uphill...Had to either have help or do it from the side...

One was recently at CCR. Mick had put some Mick-O-Pegs on the bike and I just couldn't get enough momentum to get if off the center stand while sitting on the bike...Luckily all I had to do was holler for some help and a couple of members were there in a flash... I have had to use the standing beside the bike method several times. You've really got to be careful when doing it that way.

I put both hands on the bars and pushed forward then immediately cranked the bars to the right to shift the center of gravity towards me...Side stand already deployed.....This seems to work ok but it is a little scary.....

John
Sep 11th, 2006 9:01 am
Lynn_Keen One of the few times my '99 assumed the prone position was when I tried rolling the bikeoff the centerstand while standing on the left side next to the bike. Prior to and subsequent to that event I always come off the center stand while sitting on the bike. In my garage I perform the manover in neutral with the engine off. If I'm out and about and in a parking area where the path forward and to both sides of my parking spot is clear my technique is somewhat different. I sit on the bike, feet on the pegs, engine running, trany in 1st gear. Rock forward and when both wheels are on the ground I ease out the clutch and ride away. Feet never touch the ground.
Sep 11th, 2006 1:31 am
Zotter Didn't I read - manual, service manual, here (??) - that you should NOT use the side bag handle when going up on the center stand. OR lowering to the sidestand even? That's why they put that frame mounted handle just below the pax seat.

As far as going off the center stand to side stand, I stand next the bike, rock it forward - but leave the tranny in neutral (also has to be in N for me to get it ON the centerstand!). Never even came close to dropping either side that way. I'm a short one too 30" inseam.
Sep 10th, 2006 11:02 pm
kmurphy165
Quote:
Originally Posted by petevandyke
I followed the manual exactly, standing next to the centerstand-set (would that be "centerstood?") bike, lowered the sidestand, then grabbing the left grip and left saddlebag handle rocked it forward, JUST LIKE THE MANUAL.

And I have the gouged chrome right side saddlebag guard and an angle-grind on the very bottom of the lower fairing to prove it.

I'm not sure how someone with an actual sense of humor slipped into BMW's employ, but they definitely got hired in the graphic arts and technical department.

Unless you can standing arm curl 835 pounds wet when the thing tips AWAY from you as you follow the manual, I urge you to follow what everyone else posted on this thread and do it ON THE BIKE. For safety's sake, I keep the bike off, but in first gear, clutch engaged (left lever in, in other words) and right fingers covering the front brake, when the bike rocks off the center stand, I go right to squeezing the front brake, and if necessary I could let go of the clutch lever to stop forward movement.


p
Yep. Tried it, watched it topple over on it's right side. Had the side stand extended, pulled in the clutch, pushed forward and the LT came off the center stand, bounced on the suspension, I presumed it impacted on the sidestand and promptly and gracefully flopped over on its right side. From then on, I either forget the center stand or only take the bike off the center stand when I'm astride the seat.

Curses, Foiled Again, Karl
Sep 10th, 2006 10:44 pm
hagar That's the ticket, I need to teach the wife to push me off!

I went riding with a group from work on Saturday, about 10 bikes total, 8 Harleys, my Beemer and a Honda sportbike. One female rider on a Harley, her boyfriend rode the Honda. At one of our stops his battery died, she actually PUSH STARTED him, took about 30 yards before the bike caught. Wish I had the camera ready, it was a sight to see. What a woman!
Sep 10th, 2006 10:41 pm
SilverBuffalo This one I learned from watching Randy.
Put the bike in first gear, put the side stand down and rock the bike of the centerstand.
When it comes of, it stops rolling immediately, lean it onto the side stand and "saddle up"
Sep 10th, 2006 10:25 pm
jzeiler I can usually just rock it forward off the stand - no problem with my 30" inseam. But lately (since CCR) Jean has been riding more with me. Have found we must both lean back and on the count of one.. two.. three - it takes us both to whip it down off the center stand. The LT is a lot more fun now that she is riding more.
Sep 10th, 2006 10:24 pm
petevandyke
gotta love the manual

I followed the manual exactly, standing next to the centerstand-set (would that be "centerstood?") bike, lowered the sidestand, then grabbing the left grip and left saddlebag handle rocked it forward, JUST LIKE THE MANUAL.

And I have the gouged chrome right side saddlebag guard and an angle-grind on the very bottom of the lower fairing to prove it.

I'm not sure how someone with an actual sense of humor slipped into BMW's employ, but they definitely got hired in the graphic arts and technical department.

Unless you can standing arm curl 835 pounds wet when the thing tips AWAY from you as you follow the manual, I urge you to follow what everyone else posted on this thread and do it ON THE BIKE. For safety's sake, I keep the bike off, but in first gear, clutch engaged (left lever in, in other words) and right fingers covering the front brake, when the bike rocks off the center stand, I go right to squeezing the front brake, and if necessary I could let go of the clutch lever to stop forward movement.


p
Sep 10th, 2006 9:51 pm
dronning I scoot to the right side get a good footing and push the LT off the stand with just the right foot. I don't push it off hard so as it comes off the stand I move back normal riding position.

Takes some practice to become second nature but I don't even think about it, even fully loaded and with a passenger.

Dave
Sep 10th, 2006 9:18 pm
hagar Forgot to mention that I was indeed sitting on the bike. I am 5'11" but have a long torso and short little legs, I wear 36X30 pants so I don't have much room to spare at the lower end.
Sep 10th, 2006 8:27 pm
dmatson One thing I do is when I rock it forward to get it off the center stand is keep the front brake on to minimize it's rolling forward. I would never take it off the center stand not sitting on the bike.
Sep 10th, 2006 8:19 pm
rkirker
Me too

I get on the bike to get it off the center stand, but my inseam is a 40 inch one so kinda Easy.
Sep 10th, 2006 8:11 pm
Dick
Quote:
Originally Posted by hagar
I don't have any problem getting it ON the centerstand, but how the heck do you get it OFF? I was rocking it like crazy in my garage yesterday before it finally toppled forward, and it's kind of scary with a big bike like this!

I have a slightly different technique getting it on than what I saw on this site. I put it on the side stand, and then face the rear of the bike. I put my left foot on the centerstand, and push down on it, while pulling with my right hand on the grab point on the saddlebags. If you do it right and use a smooth motion, it works like a charm and takes very little effort.
Although the booklet sez NOT to sit on the bike with the centerstand (nor the sidestand) deployed, that's ed zachery what I do. No way am I gonna follow the booklets instructions - stand beside the bike and hold the handlebar grip with left hand; hold lifting handle with right hand; push the motorcycle forward off the stand! No sir - not me. I climb aboard and rock it forward with both feet on the ground.
Sep 10th, 2006 7:22 pm
hagar
Centerstand question

I don't have any problem getting it ON the centerstand, but how the heck do you get it OFF? I was rocking it like crazy in my garage yesterday before it finally toppled forward, and it's kind of scary with a big bike like this!

I have a slightly different technique getting it on than what I saw on this site. I put it on the side stand, and then face the rear of the bike. I put my left foot on the centerstand, and push down on it, while pulling with my right hand on the grab point on the saddlebags. If you do it right and use a smooth motion, it works like a charm and takes very little effort.

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