In floor motorcycle hoist..anyone done it? - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
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post #1 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 4:04 am Thread Starter
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Question In floor motorcycle hoist..anyone done it?

I'm thinking real serious about spending the bucks for a nice lift for the bike to make it easy to farkelize as well as future maintainence. But...I really don't have the space to have to walk around the darn thing laying on the floor when its not in use.
Consequently...I'd like to cut out a section of the garage floor and install the unit flush with the garage floor. Obviously I would have to put a concrete floor in the "pit" for the hoist, but I don't want to trip over anything sticking up. So...I assume I would need a hoist with a removeable front wheel vice. A setup like this would also eliminate the need for a ramp to drive on to the hoist with...and should look pretty cool! Has anybody seen this done? Does anyone know the pros/cons of such a setup? Would there be any clearance problem at the front or rear of the hoist in terms of when it lifts? I don't even know if the unit shifts forward or to the rear as the unit lifts. I would also need to store the pumping mechanism below floor level somehow too....maybe an adjacent piece of concrete cut out with a piece of diamond plate over it? I can do all the concrete work myself...so not much cost there other than renting a concrete cutting wheel locally.
Any ideas on this would be greatly appreciated before I hack up the floor and have to listen to the wife complain about it..... Glenn

If its got tits or an engine you're gonna have trouble with it

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post #2 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 6:00 am
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Glenn,

your idea is good. Although I have not done it for my own garage I have been involved submerging lifts with similar principle. I would consider at least following:

1. Is your garage dry all year round? You don't need to wash your car in there or snow from the car does not melt on the floor. Then you don't have to worry about making a drain for the cavity. In any case the cavity will collect all kinds of dirt in it so why don't you install a hook in the ceiling so that you can lift the hoist up occasionally for cleaning the cavity...

2. While having the diamond cutter around you might want to make a "ditch" for the power cord so that it is not laying around on the floor. Make the ditch, install a proper size plastic tubing in there with the power cord inside and cover it with concrete.

3. I suppose most of the lifts stay pretty much in place when they go up and down. Check this beforehand and make the cavity according to the larger area needed.

4. Before applying the diamond cutter on your floor, make sure you have no cables or sewage pipes underneath...

5. In the cutting process you are likely to cut the reinforcement as well. Removing the pieces goes easier if you cut them smaller.

6. When making the floor of the cavity, you should use some reinforcements in the concrete as well. (Not necesseray if you did not cut all the way through, but obviously you have had hard time removing just half of your floor with an air hammer...)

Good luck and let us know how it turned out..

Regards

Ari "the Farkle-Freak-Finn" Ignatius

Hyvinkää, Finland
2004 ('05) LT, Dark Graphite, "Sunset Cruiser II"

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post #3 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 10:01 am Thread Starter
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Thanks much ....those are some great ideas. The area is always dry....its an attached and heated garage. The cars stay outside! The garage is just for toys (boat, bike, quad, lawnmowers, TV and tools).The floor is epoxy painted and I have a large piece of removeable commercial carpeting on the other side. I supposed it would'nt hurt me to put some sand in before I cement the floor base, and then put a plastic drain cover in it for misc. fluids that might end up
there.
The ceiling hook is a great idea too...never thought of that! I'm hoping to get one that I can just run the air hose to from the compressor, so I would'nt need a ditch for that - just a "compartment" on the side of the hole for the hydraulic unit to be stored in. This setup would also be good for working on the quad and mowers too. Hmm...now that I think of it....it should be tax deductible for my lawn mowing company as a neccessary tool for working on the riding mower!!! Voila...BRILLIANT!!!
Now I gotta do some research on the lifts....and get one wide enough for the quad. Most seem to have removeable side extensions. Farkles away........

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post #4 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 10:02 am
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Quote:
3. I suppose most of the lifts stay pretty much in place when they go up and down. Check this beforehand and make the cavity according to the larger area needed.
The handy lifts will have horizontal shift of the lifting platform when raising/lowering. It's not much, but it is enough to ensure a hole in the floor equal to the size of the platform will not be sufficient.

If it were me, I'd think of all sorts of options before smashing up the concrete floor of my garage...

* remove the front wheel brace and park your car/truck over the lift? My truck fits right over the Handy Lift sans front wheel brace.
* park a car in front of the garage...!
* creative reoganization of the garage...! You'd be amazed at how I fit a car, a big truck, a handy lift, two large bmw motorcycles, a few work benches, tool chest, etc. in my garage.
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post #5 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 11:04 am Thread Starter
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Thanks Dan...thats exactly what I was concerned about.....horizontal shifting as the mechanism lifts. Looks like I'll have to buy the lift first, then get the measurements needed to allow for such movement.

If its got tits or an engine you're gonna have trouble with it

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post #6 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 12:12 pm
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My lift would recess without issue except perhaps the controls which could be modified to limit clearance beyond the needs of the platform itself. I have considered the idea of recessing several times but before I make a permenant structural change that might not apeal to the next owner of the house I'd consider on of the 'storable' models. I saw a nice one at the motorcycle show that stored upright against the wall.

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post #7 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 12:57 pm
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I like the idea of the lift buried in the garage floor --- you've already thought about this better than I would have and received a lot of great suggestions--- I might chip out a lip area to lay a piece of diamond plate over the opening, to keep any tripping hazards or ugly openings for the next home owner to a minimum. The next owner could use the area as a vault to hide stuff in.

Paul & June Moore
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post #8 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 1:32 pm
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Don't do it

Sorry if this was mentioned but your lift will be too low to work on the bike comfortably.

One of my buddies did this and regrets it.

If you do do it make room for the controls and if you have extensions on your lift the pipes the extension slide on stick out 3/8" - 1/2" so you need to adjust the hole accordingly.

Dave

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post #9 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 3:34 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dronning
Sorry if this was mentioned but your lift will be too low to work on the bike comfortably.

One of my buddies did this and regrets it.

Dave
Interesting thought. I had been looking at a lift that raised the bike up 33" when fully up, and sits about 7" high when lowered. Since my garage is small, I had planned on sinking the lift in a pit as well to make it even with the floor, since moving the lift out of the way when not in use isn't practical. The 7" height would mean a total lift height of about 28". Shouldn't be too bad for sitting on a short shop stool when working on the lower bits. As long as I don't have to kneel I'm happy - the bubble gum and chicken wire holding my left knee together tends to complain when I have to do that.
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post #10 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 4:05 pm Thread Starter
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I found one of the lifts on EBay (can't remember which one) that lifts up 43". Most of the other ones only lift 33". I had'nt given a thought to losing that 7" from recessing it...thanks much.

As far as the next homeowner is concerned....he can fill it in with a wooden frame and floor piece for hidden storage...or I can fill it in with concrete and trowel it in....its not that much work either way.

If its got tits or an engine you're gonna have trouble with it

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post #11 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 6:57 pm
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* creative reoganization of the garage...! You'd be amazed at how I fit a car, a big truck, a handy lift, two large bmw motorcycles, a few work benches, tool chest, etc. in my garage.

I'd love to see pictures. I have a car, golf cart, handy lift, sheves, refrigerater, large workbench, the cap for my Dodge PU hanging from the ceiling, two bicycles and two motorcycles in my garage and I'm cramped. I'm always looking for new ideas.

Jerry Miller
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post #12 of 16 Old Mar 18th, 2006, 10:55 pm
 
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Lift

I've done it but I didn't use a cycle lift. Mine started life as a hydraulic machine shop lift table, 1000 lbs capacity. there are no negatives, when not in use I can park my car over it.
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post #13 of 16 Old Mar 19th, 2006, 5:15 am Thread Starter
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Harv....I'm open to all suggestions and am very creative....do you have any pictures?

If its got tits or an engine you're gonna have trouble with it

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post #14 of 16 Old Mar 19th, 2006, 7:18 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riderup1
I'm thinking real serious about spending the bucks for a nice lift for the bike to make it easy to farkelize as well as future maintainence. But...I really don't have the space to have to walk around the darn thing laying on the floor when its not in use.
Consequently...I'd like to cut out a section of the garage floor and install the unit flush with the garage floor. Obviously I would have to put a concrete floor in the "pit" for the hoist, but I don't want to trip over anything sticking up. So...I assume I would need a hoist with a removeable front wheel vice. A setup like this would also eliminate the need for a ramp to drive on to the hoist with...and should look pretty cool! Has anybody seen this done? Does anyone know the pros/cons of such a setup? Would there be any clearance problem at the front or rear of the hoist in terms of when it lifts? I don't even know if the unit shifts forward or to the rear as the unit lifts. I would also need to store the pumping mechanism below floor level somehow too....maybe an adjacent piece of concrete cut out with a piece of diamond plate over it? I can do all the concrete work myself...so not much cost there other than renting a concrete cutting wheel locally.
Any ideas on this would be greatly appreciated before I hack up the floor and have to listen to the wife complain about it..... Glenn
About 10 years ago there was a guy at the Daytona swapmeet sellin' Air over Hydraulic floor lifts. Very simple concept. In fact his demo was just a hole in the ground, & a plywood "floor". The plate could be recessed to flush, & the whole thing could be rotated (or locked) when raised. He's out of business now, but finding a similar set up shouldn't be difficult.

The issues I see are:
Installation..........A simple 12" to 15" hole about 2' or 3' deep for the cylinder, a recess for the plate, & access for the air control. Of course punchin' a hole in your garage floor means you need to retreat for termite protection or your contract will be voided, but that's simple enough.
You're right, a removable wheel vice would be necessary, but that'll be easy to engineer. Hmmm.........you're givin' me thoughts about the new house....

Jinks ('86fxrs, '07 FLTR)
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post #15 of 16 Old Mar 19th, 2006, 11:15 am
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Thumbs down

If you do this be prepared to stoop as much if not more than if you were on your knees. The lift will be 9-12" shorter than if on a flat floor.

Jon Bush
' 09 RT
"SAPHIRE"
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post #16 of 16 Old Mar 19th, 2006, 12:01 pm
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'Air over Hydraulic floor lifts'

The local Honda shop I buy my J&M stuff from has these in there shop. The first time I saw one of their mechanics just give it a nudge and spun a Goldwing around so he could work on the other side just blew me away. I want one!
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