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post #1 of 12 Old Sep 14th, 2010, 10:35 pm Thread Starter
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Ideas for portable fuel container

Hello All,

I have been wrestling with the idea of carry a fuel container/bladder/cell with me on my trips.

Not sure if this exists or not. I would like for it to be light weight, compact and folds up small.

Anyone aware of this?

Dad has a 2008 GT, and those who are not aware, this is a known issue with the gas sending unit. It inaccurately reports the fuel level. BMW wants you to use their additive for this as a work around. We got stuck once and I do not want that to happen again.

Thanks
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post #2 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 5:20 am
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

I carried a 30 oz. MSR fuel bottle on the last few LD rides I did, after running out of fuel in an earlier one. It saved my bacon during my 10/10ths ride! The mearly one quart of fuel just barely got me the 15 miles I needed to get back to fuel. The quart ran out in site of the service station, was able to coast into it.

http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/stoves...ottles/product

Primus also has fuel bottles.

You can fuel bottles at most camping supply stores.

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David Shealey
Dandridge, TN
EX: '01 Black LT, BAT BYKE (Totaled at 110,000 miles)
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post #3 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 8:27 am Thread Starter
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

Thanks David.

I was thinking about a gallon size made of some type of cloth/fabric material.

I will take a look at camping sites also.

Erick
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post #4 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 8:30 am
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

The camp fuel bottle works well. I've carried one on some trips but never needed it.

There are collapsible emergency containers
http://safetycentral.com/gasohaul.html
But if you want to carry fuel, the camp fuel bottle is a better choice.

For greater capacity, Kolpin has some ATV stuff that might work.
http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com...l-Pack-Jr.aspx

Finally, if traveling with a group; instead of spare fuel, carry a siphon hose. Seldom do all the bikes in a group run out of fuel together.

Dave
-2000 K1200LT
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post #5 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 9:10 am
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

I can't find the link right now, but there was a recent discussion about adding a "tool tube" to the starboard side of the LT.

I did the mod and it is great. This tool tube would be a great place to store a couple of the fuel bottles mentioned about. I am almost certain that you can get two bottles in there.

I have the text from the post below. There is a picture on the original post that might help the imagination. I am not near home and don't have my moto with me to get another picture.

Yes, I have scraped my tube once so far...


And Ken Meese's tool storage solution is exactly what I copied after he was at my residence in Kent, WA this spring for a Tech Session...I call his invention the MTT or Meese Tool Tube.
It is constructed using a 4" tube of black plumbing ABS with a glued front and a friction-fitted rear plug... length of the 4" tube only is about 18" + ends.

The two socket head screws at the bottom of the right pannier box are replaced with longer screws to allow the circumferential flat straps to hold the MTT. On my MTT, the outer end of each strap has a through hole and the inner end is tapped for the socket head screws or you can choose to use two through holes and place a washer/nut on the screw.

I purchased a 3' x 1.25" flat piece of steel bar stock from a hardware store and shaped the flat straps about the tube with appropriate bending on the ends. Naturally, the final length has to be just right to allow a snug fit about the tube and if it is a bit too long, shim the interior circumference with weather strips or other rubber to decrease the strap's inside circumference.

Prime and finish the straps to prevent rusting. I used two coatings of slow setting epoxy doped with black pigment and brushed a coat of Rustoleum flat black on the outside of each strap to match the matte appearance of the ABS tube. Should you accidentally scratch the tube during manufacture, you can add luster to the ABS surface by wetting a rag with Toluene and wiping the tube's surface...do not overdo this step as this is a solvent for the Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS)...all you want to do is increase shine...follow the operation with soap/water rinse to neutralize the area.

Ken used a plumbing plug at the rear. This is one of those flat rubber doughnuts sandwiched between two metal discs and a wing nut to compress the doughnut with resulting circumferential expansion. I took a different approach. I used woodworking dust collection 4" to 2.5" ABS reducers. The front reducer has the short 2.5" neck sawed off and the tapered open (at the transition from the 4" to 2.5") end is plugged. Purchase a black ABS paper tray from an Office Supplier of choice and make your discs from this and glue into place. At the rear, I used a 4" to 2.5" reducer but this one does not have the taper from the 4" to 2.5" tube. The 4" is flat and the 2.5" tube is centrally attached to the flat end of the 4" plug; naturally, the 2.5" tube is open. Glue a disc to the inside end of the 4" plug.

Purchase a roll of 3M Aluminum tape and increase the diameter of the rear plug sleeve until you have a "German Fit", i.e., "good-n-tight" friction fit when the plug is inserted into the rear of the MTT. I also cut the rear end of the 2.5" tube at an angle to simulate the LT's left exhaust profile, drilled a 1/8" drain hole at the inner end of the 2.5" tube and added Aluminum tape to the freshly cut, tapered end of the "faux pas" right exhaust, i.e., the MTT. The Lion's share of time for this project was consumed during the strap forming.

No, I don't have a digital camera, that's the reason for all the above text...you can thank Ken Meese for this wonderful storage addition idea. I get my 14" breaker bar with 17mm socket for the rear wheel, and all the other goodies such as mentioned by Ken, into this low, center-of-gravity addition and it looks like an exhaust at stand-off distance. Security has not been an issue to date, especially since few people know the MTT's function anyhow. Good luck and if you need assistance, PM me or Ken Meese.


And Ken Meese's tool storage solution is exactly what I copied after he was at my residence in Kent, WA this spring for a Tech Session...I call his invention the MTT or Meese Tool Tube.
It is constructed using a 4" tube of black plumbing ABS with a glued front and a friction-fitted rear plug... length of the 4" tube only is about 18" + ends.

The two socket head screws at the bottom of the right pannier box are replaced with longer screws to allow the circumferential flat straps to hold the MTT. On my MTT, the outer end of each strap has a through hole and the inner end is tapped for the socket head screws or you can choose to use two through holes and place a washer/nut on the screw.

I purchased a 3' x 1.25" flat piece of steel bar stock from a hardware store and shaped the flat straps about the tube with appropriate bending on the ends. Naturally, the final length has to be just right to allow a snug fit about the tube and if it is a bit too long, shim the interior circumference with weather strips or other rubber to decrease the strap's inside circumference.

Prime and finish the straps to prevent rusting. I used two coatings of slow setting epoxy doped with black pigment and brushed a coat of Rustoleum flat black on the outside of each strap to match the matte appearance of the ABS tube. Should you accidentally scratch the tube during manufacture, you can add luster to the ABS surface by wetting a rag with Toluene and wiping the tube's surface...do not overdo this step as this is a solvent for the Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS)...all you want to do is increase shine...follow the operation with soap/water rinse to neutralize the area.

Ken used a plumbing plug at the rear. This is one of those flat rubber doughnuts sandwiched between two metal discs and a wing nut to compress the doughnut with resulting circumferential expansion. I took a different approach. I used woodworking dust collection 4" to 2.5" ABS reducers. The front reducer has the short 2.5" neck sawed off and the tapered open (at the transition from the 4" to 2.5") end is plugged. Purchase a black ABS paper tray from an Office Supplier of choice and make your discs from this and glue into place. At the rear, I used a 4" to 2.5" reducer but this one does not have the taper from the 4" to 2.5" tube. The 4" is flat and the 2.5" tube is centrally attached to the flat end of the 4" plug; naturally, the 2.5" tube is open. Glue a disc to the inside end of the 4" plug.

Purchase a roll of 3M Aluminum tape and increase the diameter of the rear plug sleeve until you have a "German Fit", i.e., "good-n-tight" friction fit when the plug is inserted into the rear of the MTT. I also cut the rear end of the 2.5" tube at an angle to simulate the LT's left exhaust profile, drilled a 1/8" drain hole at the inner end of the 2.5" tube and added Aluminum tape to the freshly cut, tapered end of the "faux pas" right exhaust, i.e., the MTT. The Lion's share of time for this project was consumed during the strap forming.

No, I don't have a digital camera, that's the reason for all the above text...you can thank Ken Meese for this wonderful storage addition idea. I get my 14" breaker bar with 17mm socket for the rear wheel, and all the other goodies such as mentioned by Ken, into this low, center-of-gravity addition and it looks like an exhaust at stand-off distance. Security has not been an issue to date, especially since few people know the MTT's function anyhow. Good luck and if you need assistance, PM me or Ken Meese.

Glenn
Virginia Beach VA and Washington DC

2006 K1200LT "Phoenix Helena": Dark Graphite (#946)
2005 K1200LT "Dolly": Dark Graphite (#946) - Totaled July 2011
2002 K1200LT "Helga"-totaled Apr 2009
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post #6 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 9:55 am Thread Starter
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

I was thinking about having a containter for emergency usage only, I do not plan to carry fuel, just transport it if needed.
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post #7 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 11:09 am
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

www.tourtank.com has several sizes that may just be what you are looking for

Toby in New York
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post #8 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 1:34 pm
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

Quote:

Dad has a 2008 GT, and those who are not aware, this is a known issue with the gas sending unit. It inaccurately reports the fuel level. BMW wants you to use their additive for this as a work around. We got stuck once and I do not want that to happen again.

There is a thread on the fuel sensor strip on Adventure Rider http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=619359 . What I get out of it is , " The excessive sulfur inhibits the signal sent to the gas gauge" . It goes on to say , use of some fuel system cleaner will solve the problem most of the time .

On a trip to Inuvik MWT four of us used some fuel container/bladder/cell like this one http://safetycentral.com/gasohaul.html . we filled them just before us started up the Dempster Hwy. The first available gas is around 250 miles , up at Eagle Plans . So we were covering our selfs , just in case . Two of them leaked , before we made it half way to Eagle Plans . I know it made a bit of a mess on my bike, so we put the fuel in our extra cans in the bikes & scraped the cans . We didn't have any extra fuel on the return trip from Inuvik , but nobody needed it anyway .

It would not hurt to have the fuel container/bladder/cell along , just in case your Dad runs out . But I don't think they don't hold up too good

Patric Blackman
2002 K1200LT/Hannigan2+2
2010 R1200GSA ...1987 Helix...
AMA Charter Lifemember
37 Year Member of both BMWMOA & BMWRA

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post #9 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 1:45 pm
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

I've thought about carrying extra gas, and was going to use some old military canteens, 1 qt. metal with a wrap, but then wondered why. No one I ride with can go the distance I can, so it's always them that have to stop first. If I carried gas, it'd be for them, so I figured "they" can carry their own, or I can syphon some, or make a gas run if need be.
In all the miles we've ridden, it's never come up.
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post #10 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 2:38 pm
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

You do need to be aware that most states have a law that makes it illegal to dispense gasoline into anything other than "approved" containers, metal or rigid plastic designed for gasoline use.

It would be up to you of course, unless someone catches you putting fuel in a non approved container. I certainly would not transport it in any vehicle, but if you wish to walk and carry it in an emergency, your choice.

I don't want to achieve immortality through my work...I want to achieve it through not dying.

David Shealey
Dandridge, TN
EX: '01 Black LT, BAT BYKE (Totaled at 110,000 miles)
IBA SS, BB, BBG, 10/10ths.
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post #11 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 3:59 pm
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

What's the point of carrying an empty fuel pack? If someone does run out, you gotta ride to a gas station, fill the container, then ride back. Might as well just siphon some gas out of your tank then.

I always have two MSR bottles with me. That extra two quarts can make a huge difference when you're way out in the boonies and are trying to eek back into the nearest town, or when the nearest town doesn't have an open pump . . .

The only time I didn't have the MSR bottles was on the IBR, where loose fuel containers were prohibited. And yes, I ran out of gas, just barely in sight of a service station . . .

If your dad is worried about a faulty fuel gauge then just reset the trip meter, and always stop and fill up at 200 miles, or 230, or 250, or whatever you determine is a safe distance. That would work, too.

BTW, the tool tube mentioned below is a great idea. Not my idea originally, but I developed it using cheap off-the-shelf parts from a hardware store. It's a great place to carry heavy tools on the LT that you don't need very often.

I'm still trying to figure out where to fit on one the GT . . .

Ken
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Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #12 of 12 Old Sep 15th, 2010, 8:30 pm
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Re: Ideas for portable fuel container

I just received an email with info on a pretty cool set of containers for fuel, water and more.. Might be just what you are looking for, and they are approved for fuel.. Give the site a look.
http://www.eurotechmotorsports.com/f...ll&q_brand=all

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