clutch -transmission removal - BMW Luxury Touring Community
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post #1 of 20 Old Oct 27th, 2008, 5:48 pm Thread Starter
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clutch -transmission removal

Hi guys, I have a question for you guys who have replaced a clutch or have done a transmission removal. How much of the fuel system must be removed to get the engine to drop enough to remove the transmission? Just the air box or the throttle bodies too? I am trying to find a squealing noise which occurs only on a down shift. I have an 05 LT with a little over 12k on it.
I hope someone can help, This a great forum and a great bike, I don't care if I have to work on it, I wouldn't want anything else!
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post #2 of 20 Old Oct 27th, 2008, 6:38 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

the best advice is to get a Clymers Manual and look through it on the removal of the transmission. It is a bit of a job.
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post #3 of 20 Old Oct 27th, 2008, 6:43 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

I recently pulled my tranny to replace the input and output shaft seals last summer. Do you have a manual? Sure helps.

I pulled the gas tank and airbox but not the throttle body assembly. It's fairly straightforward if you follow the manual. One thing that the manual doesn't mention but this forum does is that you have to relieve (grind) a little bit of metal on the inside of the right-hand side of the frame. I had to remove about .100" from the inside of the frame. You'll see what I mean when you wrestle that thing out of there. You can get it out, but you'll never get it back in without a little bit of metal removal. Don't be shy about it though; the frame is about an inch thick at that point. You're not making the frame any weaker.

I followed the manual to the letter, and had no problems. Let me know if there are any snags. One more thing: I guess you've figured out that you need a modified 30mm deep-well socket to get your swing-arm and FD back on. The attached pics should be self-explanatory. Otherwise, let me or anyone else on the forum know...

Dave
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post #4 of 20 Old Oct 27th, 2008, 6:55 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

Here's another shot showing where I removed metal on the frame and drilled a weep hole for the clutch slave.

Dave
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post #5 of 20 Old Oct 27th, 2008, 6:55 pm Thread Starter
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

Thanks for the reply and pictures, I do have a manual, but it says to take the fuel rail and throttle bodies off, I didn't want to do that if not needed. I have enough pieces on the garage floor already, and I don't have the swing arm off yet! I know about the 30mm socket but have'nt made one yet, It's a long winter here so I have time, and thanks for the info about grinding the frame, I'm sure I would have struggled



Dave
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post #6 of 20 Old Oct 27th, 2008, 7:30 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

Quote:
Originally Posted by DasBoat2003
--------------------One thing that the manual doesn't mention but this forum does is that you have to relieve (grind) a little bit of metal on the inside of the right-hand side of the frame. I had to remove about .100" from the inside of the frame. You'll see what I mean when you wrestle that thing out of there. You can get it out, but you'll never get it back in without a little bit of metal removal. ----------------------------------

Dave
I have posted a couple of times that removing about 1/8" off the inside curved portion of the frame on the right side makes it MUCH easier to get the tranny back in again. However, it is NOT absolutely necessary.

The trick is to remove both bolts in the front motor mounts and replace them with smaller rods to allow the back of the engine to swing a little to the left when raising the engine/transmission assembly back into position.

Removing that little bit of metal sure does make the job a lot easier though!

I don't want to achieve immortality through my work...I want to achieve it through not dying.

David Shealey
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post #7 of 20 Old Oct 27th, 2008, 9:19 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

It seems to me that you really don't have to remove the fuel rail. Mine was removed because it was one of the casualties of an engine fire.

Try leaving the fuel rail on and go slowly when you lift up the frame to expose that transmission mounting bolt.

Dave
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post #8 of 20 Old Oct 28th, 2008, 7:17 am
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Exclamation Re: clutch -transmission removal

Quote:
Originally Posted by DasBoat2003
Here's another shot showing where I removed metal on the frame and drilled a weep hole for the clutch slave.

Dave
With all due respect .

You do not have to grind the frame to remove the Transmission.

If you lower the rear of the motor there is plenty of clearance for Trans removal. Loosen the front motor mounts to allow pivot of motor.

You must detach the air box and unclip the radiators for proper engine clearance.
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post #9 of 20 Old Oct 28th, 2008, 8:22 am
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

Ditto on the grinding. Just bevel the housing. Tranny wouldn't go into place. Must be a tight fit. I guess they use a shoehorn at the factory. No need to make the fit sloppy by grinding the flat off. Just a bevel so the tranny can start going up into place. I lossened the fuel bar and injectors to make more room and so I could tilt the engine more without damaging any lines etc. May be able to do it without but why take the chance on damage. Good Luck sounds like fun.
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post #10 of 20 Old Oct 28th, 2008, 12:30 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

Quote:
Originally Posted by 104strad
I have enough pieces on the garage floor already, and I don't have the swing arm off yet!
#1 lesson (ok maybe 3-4 lessons) I learned from my clutch/tranny/RMS job last year - and hopefully it's not too late for you:

1. From the very beginning of a big job, make a list of every single part you remove or re-position on the vehicle, in the order you do so. When you go to put the bike back together, following that list in reverse order will likely be a huge time-saver. Otherwise, there's a good chance you'll find yourself backtracking an hour's worth of re-build to add that part over there in the corner of the garage that you forgot or didn't realize had to be installed before those other 16 parts. Or you'll finally get that last fuel tank bolt through the hole (after much sweat, blood, tears, etc.) and realize you put the tank on too soon.

2. Before you remove anything, cut a wire tie, etc. TAKE A PICTURE. You can't take too many pictures, it's impossible. Take as many as you can and you'll still wish you had more. The pictures I had certainly saved my butt a few times. There are a couple of parts (like the clutch components) that have critical orientations that aren't obvious unless you've marked them prior to disassembly. In these cases, you'll want to put orientation marks on the parts in place before taking your photo or disturbing the parts (oh, and be careful that your thorough part washing doesn't wash off the marks!). The wiring around the throttle bodies, air box & ABS unit were particularly challenging for me, as they didn't seem to resemble the photos in the Clymer's or BMW shop manuals - and I was a bit lacking in "before" photos of these areas.

3. Go buy one or two of those plastic shelf units, about 18" deep by 48" wide, the kind with the plastic tubes that serve as the uprights between each shelf. Two five-shelf units held just about everything I took off my bike, and I didn't have to worry about cosmetic damage to the painted parts. When you're done, you can break down the shelf units and toss 'em in the attic until the next big job.

4. You should already know about bagging & tagging everything. I had a box of ziploc bags & a couple sharpies laying around.


The items above, especially #1, 2 & 4, will gain significance if you're planning on this project taking more than a few days (mine dragged on for a couple months due to other time obligations) or if you have any "helpers" (helpers are great for speeding up the project, but it also means you're witnessing less of the disassembly).

One last little tidbit - on my reassembly, I had one of the banjo bolts on the slave cylinder clocked just a tad too far counter-clockwise. This put the "wrist" of the banjo fitting on top of a raised surface on the slave cylinder. It wasn't noticeable by eye when I torqued the banjo bolt to spec. It was only after I had the bike COMPLETELY back together and bled a quart of brake fluid onto the floor that I discovered there was a problem. So I got to practice swingarm removal/reinstallation at 2am once more. I had waited to bleed the clutch until after I'd gotten my bike off the lift and out of the wheel vise (so I could turn the handlebars), and I thought I'd "save time" by getting everything put back together before taking it off the lift. DOH! Just something to keep an eye out for.

Dave

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post #11 of 20 Old Oct 28th, 2008, 1:28 pm Thread Starter
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

Thanks for all the advice, this forum has a ton of priceless information on it! As this is a winter project, and winters are very long here, I am taking it really slow and have a digital camera and a fresh box of sandwich bags with a sharpie close by,I am hoping I will be okay. I have a factory manual for a older ( 99) LT but I am old so my memory of the small details may be a problem. Thanks again you guys are the best!

Dave
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post #12 of 20 Old Oct 28th, 2008, 6:17 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

These guys are real sticklers for details. Yes, you don't have to grind the frame to remove the tranny. My clearance problem was when the tranny was re-installed and I was lowering the frame back down. As dshealey said, that could have been remedied by loosening the motor mounts. Good idea.

One more thing about the fuel rail question: You might have to remove connectors on the fuel injectors and throttle position sensors when raising the frame. Maybe even removing the wiring harness clamp that runs across the top of the frame, too. I'd keep a close eye on the wiring around the fuel rail when raising the frame.

Good Luck!
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post #13 of 20 Old Oct 29th, 2008, 5:43 pm Thread Starter
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

It is good to know I wont need the grinder, I was going to loosen the motor mounts anyway according to the manual and I was going to take it real slow going in and out. I have the air box off now so I can see the fuel system better. This is kinda fun but hard to believe I would have to do the same job just to replace the starter! Thanks for the reply Dave.

Dave Sienicki
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post #14 of 20 Old Oct 29th, 2008, 6:27 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

Kinda fun?

Yup. You're definitely one of us...
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post #15 of 20 Old Mar 12th, 2015, 3:11 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

I just found this thread and I'm in the middle of a clutch replacement on my '07 LT. I'm at the point where I'm supposed to remove the air box. I've got the intake port out and the tube that goes from the intake to the box. Now I'm stuck. I can probably get the "non reusable" clamps off the front two ports but the 2 rear one are held on by regular screw clamps which I can't get to. If, as many have stated, you do not have to take the fuel rail off, how do you get to these 2 screws to remove the air box? Any help here would be greatly appreciated.

thank you
Joe
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post #16 of 20 Old Mar 12th, 2015, 8:54 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

You can just tug upwards and they will most likely pop right off. I had a hard time on the last one it did as I could just barely get to the screw head and move it a tiny bit at a time. Then I was able to slide it around and get on it proper. There is no lip to overcome on the throttle body tops. Just a smooth surface.
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post #17 of 20 Old Mar 12th, 2015, 11:19 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

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You can just tug upwards and they will most likely pop right off. I had a hard time on the last one it did as I could just barely get to the screw head and move it a tiny bit at a time. Then I was able to slide it around and get on it proper. There is no lip to overcome on the throttle body tops. Just a smooth surface.
Pretty sure that's what happened when we did mine, except they popped out slightly first under pressure, so I decided to undo the clamps and let them slip out...hoping for the best afterwards. They slid straight back on and it was easy to turn the clamp-rings to where I could get at the screw heads.

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post #18 of 20 Old Mar 13th, 2015, 10:23 am
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

is there some super secret BMW tool that is needed to remove the front 2 "non reusable" clips?
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post #19 of 20 Old Mar 13th, 2015, 3:26 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

OK, is it me or is this bike just impossible to work on. I'm trying to "loosen the engine mounting bolts on the left and right" and find that the hex bolt on the left side has a nut that can not be reached. Anyone know how to loosen the engine mounting bolt on the left side of the engine. I've taken the radiators off and still can't get any kind of tool to hold the nut so I can get the hex bolt off. Anyone interested in a half taken apart 2007 LT. I am starting to think my buddies who ride Harleys are better off. This is way too frustrating. I've taken cars, engines and transmissions apart and did all the work on my R100RT so I'm pretty sure I'm not incompetent. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Joe
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post #20 of 20 Old Mar 13th, 2015, 7:48 pm
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Re: clutch -transmission removal

Well I finally said screw it to the parts I could not access and took out the transmission mounting bolt. I don't know if the '07 bike is different but as soon as I pulled the bolt the whole motor and trans dropped down. It took a little wiggling and jiggling but it came right off. Does anyone know why all that nonsense is in there about all the removal of the throttle rail, fuel rail, engine mounting bolts? I have no idea how anyone can remove the starboard front engine bolt since the nut that is on the end can simply not be accessed. Well, at least not without taking all the frame pieces off and finding the thinnest 19mm wrench with the skinniest handle ever. Anyway, it's time for a Bud and then to the clutch removal. Wish me luck.
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