Aftermarket lift-handle availibility??? - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
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post #1 of 18 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 8:33 pm Thread Starter
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Aftermarket lift-handle availibility???

I'm beginning to envy the owners of LT's with hydraulic centerstands. Does anyone know if a better manual "lift handle" is available for the older LT's? My forearm and elbow are feeling the cumulative effect of the many times I have placed the scoot on its centerstand. I'm hoping there is some sort of device that doesn't require a 130 degree clockwise rotation of the hand toward the bike to grasp the factory lift handle. If the lift handle were further extended from the bike I could grasp the handle with my palm facing me instead of the bike, causing much less stress on my arm. Any info would be appreciated.
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post #2 of 18 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 8:47 pm
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I don't want to sound anything but helpful.
You are working too hard if you are pulling that hard on the handle.
There may be some problem with your shocks that is letting your bike sit too low. Others know more about that than me.
Try being sure the bike is standing up straight, rock it on the center stand to make sure both feet are touching, evenly balanced. Give that pedal a push with your foot, let it rock back, and when the momentum swings the other way, stand on it.
It really should go right up.

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post #3 of 18 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 9:20 pm Thread Starter
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Phydough, no offense taken; your comments are welcomed. I am partly to blame for my problem. Age and old injuries have been contributing factors. I also try to gently lift the bike on its centerstand because of my fear (probably unfounded) of having the centerstand pivot break and the bike take a dump. The physics of having 800+ lbs brought to a sudden stop by a relatively spindly pivot doesn't sit well. A failure is always in the back of my mind, thus, I don't try to quickly horse the bike onto the centerstand. I can handle the weight of the LT but the required hand position hurts like a SOB.
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post #4 of 18 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 9:40 pm
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Early on in my ownership, someone mentioned that they found it easier to utilize the saddlebag handle in lieu of the formal grab handle. I tried it and never went back to the lift handle. Works better for me.
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post #5 of 18 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 10:27 pm
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You could try parking with the rear wheel on a piece of 3/8 plywood. It will lean more on the side stand, but will take less effort to get it on the center stand, if you need too. I've been doing this when the rear tire gets worn down, toward the end of it's life.

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post #6 of 18 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 8:57 am
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Side case handle

Quote:
Originally Posted by alanforn
Early on in my ownership, someone mentioned that they found it easier to utilize the saddlebag handle in lieu of the formal grab handle. I tried it and never went back to the lift handle. Works better for me.
+1 on the side case handle - I used to think it near impossible to put the bike on the center stand...after a few weeks of practice, and using the side case handle, it became easy with no significant joint or muscle strain. Hopefully your body will hold out that long

Perhaps you could try that rear tire shim idea and gradually go with thinner shims as you get the hang of it.

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post #7 of 18 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 9:29 am
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maybe we need a air assist on the back shock to raise the back end up to allow the center stand just to fall down, no lifting needed......

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post #8 of 18 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 9:36 am
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How about a shorter center stand similar to the old Reynolds Ride Off stand? It worked very well with almost no effort at all to deploy.

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post #9 of 18 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 9:48 am
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I did not use all that much lifting on the handle, just a little lift and back motion, the real key is to put all your weight on the centerstand arm. It will not break like the new GT centerstands seem to be doing.

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post #10 of 18 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 11:44 am
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I can't use the grab handle either. So I take a soft tie down strap (18" long) thread it through the grab handle. I put my hand through both loops and this makes it easier to put the bike up on the centerstand.

Dave

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post #11 of 18 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 12:18 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garry_kramer
maybe we need a air assist on the back shock to raise the back end up to allow the center stand just to fall down, no lifting needed......

Garry
Hmmm.... just brainstorming here, but those crazy Germans have come up with more elaborate schemes that this :

How about a pair of integrated, extra-long side stands, one on each side, which deploy in tandem (linked together) that don't lift the bike, but leave it standing upright?

Hey Ari, you awake???

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post #12 of 18 Old Oct 31st, 2007, 10:28 pm
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wilbar00c
You could try parking with the rear wheel on a piece of 3/8 plywood. It will lean more on the side stand, but will take less effort to get it on the center stand, if you need too. I've been doing this when the rear tire gets worn down, toward the end of it's life.
This is a great way to ease up onto the center stand. I have had neck surgery and have a 99 LT. I just put a 3/4 inch board behind the rear wheel and roll up on it before I lift it onto the center stand. This saves strain and allows practice.
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post #13 of 18 Old Nov 1st, 2007, 8:11 am
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Having owned by LT for only 6 months now, I have come really love this bike. My first experiences with setting it on the center stand were impossible. After reading the post on how to use more body weight on the stand, the bike just pops up. I was originally using the side case handle but was concerned that it might not be strong enough so I started only using the lift handle. I see some suggestions to use the case handle and I would rather use it since it is a better angle. Should I be concerned that I could rip the case handle or the case off the bike?
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post #14 of 18 Old Nov 1st, 2007, 9:47 am
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I know there have been countless posts about using the center-stand, but I'll throw in my testimonial on the importance of proper technique. Like many, I had a lot of trouble getting the bike on the stand at first, and it could get spooky when it would almost make it and then come back down with me standing there in an awkward position.

The first major breakthrough for me was when I learned to put a little weight on the stand lever and then push the bike upright so that its weight was on both legs of the stand. With smaller bikes, I don't have to consciously do this, it's just naturally incorporated into the process, but with the weight of these bigger bikes you might have to make this a separate step. This (for me) made an enormous difference. I still used a good bit of arm to "pull" it up, but it was no longer intimidating.

Then, after reading somebody's post on this site, I started practicing a slight rocking motion on the lever. I already have some weight on the lever from the step above so a little of the load has been removed from the suspension and the bike is sitting just a touch higher than it would be without me. By taking some weight off the lever, the bike lowers as the shocks compress slightly. I then stand on the lever as the shocks "rebound" and she comes right up, no pulling required if all is timed correctly. This is all done in one nice smooth motion and is over in maybe a second.

The key for me was timing the weight transfer and getting the balance just right. Now it's second nature. I can get the bike up easily and I've learned when to ease off as the bike reaches that "breakover" point so she settles onto the stand as gently as possible. Once in a while I get sloppy and need to pull on the grab-bar a little, but it's never a strain.

I always put her on the center-stand when I park in the garage, so I get a lot of practice. My father was impressed with how easy I make it look when I ride home for a visit. He wanted me to give him some pointers as he had a difficult time with his Gold Wing. I was wearing sneakers and had walked through some damp grass just before the demonstration (you know what's coming...).

Of course, the GW has a totally difference balance and lever geometry, so when I attempted the whole thing the way I would with the LT, my balance was wrong and my wet sneaker slipped off the lever.

She laid over nice and slow, like a sinking ship. Whoops!
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post #15 of 18 Old Nov 1st, 2007, 9:48 am
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different drummer method

this is what I do... your mileage may vary.....

roll the bike gently towards the rear....once the bike has been moving 8-10 inches....then step on the stand pedal...the bike's own momentum will put it on the stand...

no strain... no pain....

sounds looney....MAY BE LOONEY.....;-) but it works for me.

g.

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post #16 of 18 Old Nov 1st, 2007, 10:25 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DakotaDude
I'm beginning to envy the owners of LT's with hydraulic centerstands. Does anyone know if a better manual "lift handle" is available for the older LT's? My forearm and elbow are feeling the cumulative effect of the many times I have placed the scoot on its centerstand. I'm hoping there is some sort of device that doesn't require a 130 degree clockwise rotation of the hand toward the bike to grasp the factory lift handle. If the lift handle were further extended from the bike I could grasp the handle with my palm facing me instead of the bike, causing much less stress on my arm. Any info would be appreciated.
That's not a bad idea - a handle that extends from the frame at a 90 angle would be perfect. Tate should make one! (Tate is a forum member that makes the replacement trunk latch) The only problem is that you are still "reaching" in order to grab it.

But until then here's something I posted a couple of years ago and is in the Hall of Wisdom - give it a try...

"Over the past four years I've been pretty lucky not to wrench my back putting the beast on the center stand. I even posted that I did not understand what the big problem was..... well, a couple of weeks ago I finally messed up my back good doing exactly this - luckily it is nothing more than a muscle pull. Ibuprofen is my friend.

As part of the team that designs our seats we work with an ergonomics specialist, and I was complaining to her how badly I hurt myself. She asked me to demonstrate (kind of) how I put it up on the centerstand:

Grab the left handle bar grip with my left hand, put my right hand on the "grip" below the seat, face the bike and stand on the extension with my right foot. Then TRY to make one very smooth motion utililizing all three points for leverage.

This is exactly how I tweaked my back, and it is WRONG.

Her recommendation was to grab the left handle bar grip with my left hand, grab the luggage "grab rail" (passenger grab rail on top of the side hard case) with my right hand, (don't worry, it won't break) face the BACK of the bike, and stand on the extension with my LEFT foot, while standing up straight, back arched with my head level.

Not only could I get her up with my bad back, it was probably 50% of the effort. What I had done before was causing torsion (twisting) and is VERY bad for your bod - DUH. Fugghedabout the "grip" below the seat, it is dangerous since you need to reach to use it.

This is all new to me and I hope this helps out someone since I know it has been a "bone of contention" for years. "

If you do this correctly you will have all of your weight on your left leg - and your right leg will be dangling in the air once it is fully on the stand. Keeping your left hip in contact with the bike assures that you are standing up straight.

One other thing that helps dramatically - make sure the pre-load on your rear shock is set toward max, and that the reservoir is completely filled with fluid. Almost all of them can use some and it's easy to fill.


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post #17 of 18 Old Nov 1st, 2007, 5:09 pm
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I always put it up on the center stand while still sitting on the bike, works way easier for me
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post #18 of 18 Old Nov 1st, 2007, 11:00 pm
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There are several folks who have retrofitted the electo-hydraulic centerstand to their pre-2005 LT. Not inexpensive, but something you can do for yourself.

Antony (Tripod)
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