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post #1 of 21 Old Oct 15th, 2007, 7:13 pm Thread Starter
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Ohlins question

I have about 10K on my Ohlins.
What I have noticed so far: The OEM shocks were removed around 38K miles. They were working fine, but perhaps a little harsh on the bumps, but the ride was solid and the bike tracked great. The Ohlins made the ride smoother, no question. But in corners, especially two up, when hitting a bump there is wallowing and the bike does not track as well as it did with the old OEM shocks.

I have tightened up the hydraulic adjuster of the rear shock with no noticable difference.

I am thinking I need to tighen up the pre-load on the springs, front and rear (but I suspect mostly rear). I am hoping this will reduce the wallowing, but will make the ride a little harsher (which I am willing to accept).

Before I go and crank down those springs I thought I'd ask, have others experienced this, and I am I taking the correct approach in increasing spring pre-load?

Thanks in advance.
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post #2 of 21 Old Oct 15th, 2007, 7:22 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieVT
I have about 10K on my Ohlins.
What I have noticed so far: The OEM shocks were removed around 38K miles. They were working fine, but perhaps a little harsh on the bumps, but the ride was solid and the bike tracked great. The Ohlins made the ride smoother, no question. But in corners, especially two up, when hitting a bump there is wallowing and the bike does not track as well as it did with the old OEM shocks.

I have tightened up the hydraulic adjuster of the rear shock with no noticable difference.

I am thinking I need to tighen up the pre-load on the springs, front and rear (but I suspect mostly rear). I am hoping this will reduce the wallowing, but will make the ride a little harsher (which I am willing to accept).

Before I go and crank down those springs I thought I'd ask, have others experienced this, and I am I taking the correct approach in increasing spring pre-load?

Thanks in advance.

When you bought the Ohlins were they built for you ie your weight and riding style?? If not, out of the box Ohlins are set up for about 160lb rider and are too soft for most people. You should have them set up with the proper springs for you weight and riding style...

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post #3 of 21 Old Oct 15th, 2007, 7:42 pm Thread Starter
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Ohlins setup

Yes, when I ordered the Ohlins I gave the vendor my riding style and weight, and the fact that I ride two up some of the time. I think that I have the "standard" spring based on the conversation with the vendor . Which leads to another question: how many different springs does Ohlins offer? From taking with the vendor, I came to understand that there were two springs, standard and heavy. I have read many posts about setting up the Ohlins for weight and riding style but I have never heard a knowledable source state how many different springs there really are.
You are the first I have heard to say the the standard spring is inadequate for riders over 160 lbs. My vendor cited something over 200lbs (220 IIRC) before going to the heavy duty spring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tedhudson
When you bought the Ohlins were they built for you ie your weight and riding style?? If not, out of the box Ohlins are set up for about 160lb rider and are too soft for most people. You should have them set up with the proper springs for you weight and riding style...
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post #4 of 21 Old Oct 15th, 2007, 8:01 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieVT
Yes, when I ordered the Ohlins I gave the vendor my riding style and weight, and the fact that I ride two up some of the time. I think that I have the "standard" spring based on the conversation with the vendor . Which leads to another question: how many different springs does Ohlins offer? From taking with the vendor, I came to understand that there were two springs, standard and heavy. I have read many posts about setting up the Ohlins for weight and riding style but I have never heard a knowledable source state how many different springs there really are.
You are the first I have heard to say the the standard spring is inadequate for riders over 160 lbs. My vendor cited something over 200lbs (220 IIRC) before going to the heavy duty spring.
I don't know how many springs there are, I thought that there were at least three. If you're riding two up on an LT IMHO you need a heavier spring. You show call Dan Kyle at Kyle Racing. He is a vendor on this site and is an Ohlins expert...

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post #5 of 21 Old Oct 15th, 2007, 9:17 pm
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This is interesting. I assumed that Ohlins were bought and setup with some sort of magic spring for the specific weight range... Seems like the spring selection for Ohlins are not quite as customized as I was lead to believe.. Maybe someone will have some real hard information.

As I was trying to do some research on the HyperPro shocks (I expect will be on a group buy soon?) I ran across this Bikepoint website. Under riding tips and bike setup there is a reprint of 6 magazine articles on setting up your shock sag and rebound.

From your description of your problem it seems like you need to make some adjustments. The description of your fault is detailed in the article stream.

Take a read and see what you think.

Jack D. (Southern Connecticut)
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post #6 of 21 Old Oct 15th, 2007, 9:35 pm
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Wallowing could be caused by too little rebound damping. That actually sounds more plausible than too little spring would probably cause bottoming out, not wallowing. Rebound damping is a simple adjustment that can be performed without taking anything apart, so you may as well start there anyway.

Here's how. Lie on the ground, and look up at the bottom of the shock body. You'll see a black plastic ridged knob between the bottom of the shock and the mounting stirrup. I forget which way you turn it to increase damping, but no matter. Turn it a few clicks (like maybe two or three), and take it for a ride. It'll either be better or worse. Adjust accordingly.

The entire range is 16 clicks as I recall. So midpoint is around 8 clicks and makes a good starting point. There are positive stops at either end of the range. So you can start by turning the knob either way and counting how many clicks you get before it stops. You'll be surprised at how much of a difference a couple of clicks make.
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post #7 of 21 Old Oct 15th, 2007, 9:48 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog
Wallowing could be caused by too little rebound damping. That actually sounds more plausible than too little spring would probably cause bottoming out, not wallowing. Rebound damping is a simple adjustment that can be performed without taking anything apart, so you may as well start there anyway.

Here's how. Lie on the ground, and look up at the bottom of the shock body. You'll see a black plastic ridged knob between the bottom of the shock and the mounting stirrup. I forget which way you turn it to increase damping, but no matter. Turn it a few clicks (like maybe two or three), and take it for a ride. It'll either be better or worse. Adjust accordingly.

The entire range is 16 clicks as I recall. So midpoint is around 8 clicks and makes a good starting point. There are positive stops at either end of the range. So you can start by turning the knob either way and counting how many clicks you get before it stops. You'll be surprised at how much of a difference a couple of clicks make.
That's good advise Joel. Sometimes I over look the obvious

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post #8 of 21 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 1:51 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog
The entire range is 16 clicks as I recall. So midpoint is around 8 clicks and makes a good starting point. There are positive stops at either end of the range. So you can start by turning the knob either way and counting how many clicks you get before it stops. You'll be surprised at how much of a difference a couple of clicks make.
I've been dealing with this myself on my new (1500 miles) shocks and trying to get them set up. The range of "clicks" is around 40 - the setup for the LT from the factory is 16 clicks from "zero" - see here for the settings (page 5).

You may also want to make sure that the spring preload compression (see here) is set as shown, otherwise your pre-load adjuster may not work as advertised. This setting should have come from the factory at 26mm - but easy enough to check - and your shocks should have included the spanner wrench for this purpose.

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post #9 of 21 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 7:43 am Thread Starter
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Thanks gents

Very helpful posts and suggestions.
Rebound damper sounds like a good place to start experimenting.
(I didn't know, or had forgotten that it was even there).


Sunny, 32 degrees F this AM, trees are starting to lose their leaves of color here in the deep south of Vermont. Looks like a riding day today!
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post #10 of 21 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 11:19 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gino
I've been dealing with this myself on my new (1500 miles) shocks and trying to get them set up. The range of "clicks" is around 40 - the setup for the LT from the factory is 16 clicks from "zero" - see here for the settings (page 5).
Very good! Thanks for the clarification, Gino!

Cheers,
-joel
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post #11 of 21 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 12:50 pm
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Here are two replies I received from Ohlins a few months ago regarding my question about the different springs available for the LT:

Dear Sirs,

I am considering installing new Ohlins shocks on my 2005 K1200 LT, the model with the hydraulic centre stand.

I note that according to your web site, there are TWO rear shocks available for my bike,

46 DRS part BM 539
and
46 DRS part BM 548

what is the difference between the two, and if there is, which one do you reccomend I install on my bike ?.

Kind regards,

Simon Tow


Dear Simon,
The difference is the springrate only.
BM 539, spring 01099-74, springrate 180N/mm, this is standard.
BM 548, spring 01099-84, springrate 200N/mm.
This is to give customers with a lot of weight on the BMW an optional shock.

Best Regards
Lars Isaksson
Öhlins Racing AB
Marketing & Sales
Office: Instrumentvägen 8-10
Mail: Box 722
S-194 27 Upplands Väsby
Sweden



Lars,
It has just occurred to me that I did not ask you what you meant by "a lot of weight".
I weigh around 75 kgs and my passenger around 50 kgs, and we normally only use the bike for long trips, so we (she) takes a lot of luggage with us.
Would this be a lot of weight in your opinion ?.
Thanks,
Simon "


Simon,
Standard spring will be ok for your weight, the heavier spring is for 200 + kg.
Best Regards / Lars



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post #12 of 21 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 12:57 pm
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Very Informative..

I taking this to mean that the 'customized spring rate' for weight with Ohlins 'premium' shocks are basically two choices... ?? I obviously had a different impression. The HyperPro shocks are looking better all the time.

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post #13 of 21 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 1:58 pm
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So did I but when you take into account that the bike weighs 761 lbs dry excluding options and accessories, BEFORE any rider or passenger gets on, the extra bulge around the waist, in the sum of things, won´t make much difference.
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post #14 of 21 Old Oct 16th, 2007, 4:51 pm Thread Starter
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Isn't this a great site!?

Thanks gents.

Adjusting the rebound damper is easier than adjustion the hydraulic preload adjuster (if you fine lying down on the ground and reaching up for the bottom of the shock easier that opening the sidecase and lifting the seat to get to the preload adjuster.

I added 4 clicks to my rebound damper; haven't done the test ride yet but it makes sense to me that this is the fix I was looking for.

An added benefit from the posts to this thread is the info about Ohlin spring options and the links to the Ohlin site for shock tuning info.

Mucho appreciative in the deep south of Vermont.
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post #15 of 21 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 3:17 am
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Yes but each adjustment is for entirely different things.

Also I think you are confusing the rebound dampner with the compression one.

The first one is at the bottom of the shock, the second at the top.

Basically the rebound damping is adjusted to the bikes type and weight and only set once.

The compression dampner is adjusted according to the load being carried at any given moment.

This is why it is easlily accesible. A turn more or less on this won´t make much difference to the bikes handling.

Not the same with the rebound dampner, which is more trial and error and can seriously affect the bikes handling and ride comfort.

The standard SHOWA shock doesn´t have this rebound adjustment possibility.

That´s how I understand it anyway.
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post #16 of 21 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 6:04 am Thread Starter
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Each is adjustment for different things

Thanks for your efforts to clarify, but I am not confused. The links to the articles and Ohlins sites provided by the folks who responded above provided a clear description of the various adjustments on the Ohlins.

Anyone with a set of Ohlins would probably benefit from reading that stuff.

When I installed my Ohlins I basically slapped them in there and forgot them. After riding them for some time I realized they could use improvement; I would have done well to read all that information at the time I installed them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by simoncharles
Yes but each adjustment is for entirely different things.

Also I think you are confusing the rebound dampner with the compression one.

The first one is at the bottom of the shock, the second at the top.

Basically the rebound damping is adjusted to the bikes type and weight and only set once.

The compression dampner is adjusted according to the load being carried at any given moment.

This is why it is easlily accesible. A turn more or less on this won´t make much difference to the bikes handling.

Not the same with the rebound dampner, which is more trial and error and can seriously affect the bikes handling and ride comfort.

The standard SHOWA shock doesn´t have this rebound adjustment possibility.

That´s how I understand it anyway.
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post #17 of 21 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 7:55 am
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Charlie,

I didn´t say you were "confused" but "think you are confusing".

What I meant was that you yourself say:

"Adjusting the rebound damper is easier than adjustion the hydraulic preload adjuster (if you fine lying down on the ground and reaching up for the bottom of the shock easier that opening the sidecase and lifting the seat to get to the preload adjuster"

which to me doesn´t make sense, that´s all, as it implies that you find it easier to adjust the rebound dampner than the preload under the seat.

If it´s clear and easier for you, then fine.

Simon

Last edited by simoncharles; Oct 17th, 2007 at 8:01 am.
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post #18 of 21 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 6:16 pm Thread Starter
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Wink Ohlins digression

[QUOTE=simoncharles]Charlie,

"I didn´t say you were "confused" but "think you are confusing"."

Now there's a distinction without a difference.
I confess to being confused and confusing at the same time. It is a talent, but no great honor.


"What I meant was that you yourself say: "Adjusting the rebound damper is easier than adjustion the hydraulic preload adjuster (if you fine lying down on the ground and reaching up for the bottom of the shock easier that opening the sidecase and lifting the seat to get to the preload adjuster" which to me doesn´t make sense, that´s all, as it implies that you find it easier to adjust the rebound dampner than the preload under the seat."

Well, actually.... that IS what I meant. I can adjust the rebound damper quicker and easier than I can open the sidecase, pull the seat release, tip the BackUp backrest out of the way, lift the seat, raise the hydraulic preload adjuster, make the adjustment, and then put everything back.
To do the rebound damper, I lie down, reach in and adjust the thing, then get back up again. Now.... as getting back up again gets increasingly difficult for me, I may change my mine as to which is easier to do.

BTW... this is mean to be humorous, sometimes that intent really gets lost in this medium, hence all the and

Best to you from the deep south of Vermont.
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post #19 of 21 Old Oct 17th, 2007, 9:16 pm
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When I got my Ohlins this last year I was told there were two springs, one set up for a person 15 to 210lbs and if you were more than that or carried more weight then the heavy duty spring was ordered. I weigh 160 and ride 99% one up I also removed the top box close to 40lbs. When I put the shocks on I noticed a much stiffer ride, no bottoming over speed bumps and no wallowing in truns no matter how fast or what I was draggin. I did check the set up on my shocks and they were set in the middle of adjustment. I shanged the stockers out at 17K and they were still good (for stock). I wish the OHlins were smoother on the small stuff like I was lead to believe but they are an amazing difference on aggressive riding. When you are adjusting your shocks make sure you don't just ride the bike adjust then ride some more. You need to ride it over the same course for each adjustment at the same speed and make small adjustments. To get the LT to start to wallow in a turn if the preload is set up correct would probably be the rebound to soft or a loose shock.

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post #20 of 21 Old Oct 18th, 2007, 10:43 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmatson
I wish the OHlins were smoother on the small stuff like I was lead to believe but they are an amazing difference on aggressive riding.
Which spring did you get?

When I got mine, they immediately felt incredibly smooth on rough road with the stock spring. At my first rebuild, I got talked into a stiffer spring. The shock lost smoothness, but still handled great. After two more rebuilds, I finally had the stock spring put back on. I got my smoothness back, and still handles great. People who over spring are fooling themselves.
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post #21 of 21 Old Nov 19th, 2007, 5:02 pm Thread Starter
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Final report

Thanks to all who made suggestions in response to my original query.
My complaint was wallowing when riding two-up and encountering bumps in the corners.

I turned the rebound damper at the lower end of the shock two clicks.

I have ridden the new setting for a while now and am happy to report this adjustment resolved my complaint.

Thanks Again.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieVT
I have about 10K on my Ohlins.
What I have noticed so far: The OEM shocks were removed around 38K miles. They were working fine, but perhaps a little harsh on the bumps, but the ride was solid and the bike tracked great. The Ohlins made the ride smoother, no question. But in corners, especially two up, when hitting a bump there is wallowing and the bike does not track as well as it did with the old OEM shocks.

I have tightened up the hydraulic adjuster of the rear shock with no noticable difference.

I am thinking I need to tighen up the pre-load on the springs, front and rear (but I suspect mostly rear). I am hoping this will reduce the wallowing, but will make the ride a little harsher (which I am willing to accept).

Before I go and crank down those springs I thought I'd ask, have others experienced this, and I am I taking the correct approach in increasing spring pre-load?

Thanks in advance.
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