Gear Indicator Switch - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
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post #1 of 7 Old Aug 5th, 2007, 11:10 pm Thread Starter
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Cool Gear Indicator Switch

Anyone ever changed the gear indicator switch on the back of the transmission?

I've had trouble with mine being intermitant and indicating gears from 1 to 9 regardless what gear I'm actually in for several years now, especially in rainy weather. I purchased a new switch, but a quick look at the location looks like a real pita to change. The rear swing arm pivot appears to directly in the way? Any hints or tricks out there that will make this job easier?
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post #2 of 7 Old Aug 6th, 2007, 5:35 am
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Greetings Vern

I replaced my gear indicator switch on my old '83 K100 last year. If they haven't changed their design too much, I think you'll find the location of the switch more or less the same as the early K75's and K100's.

Remove the rear wheel, remove the bevel box (rear drive unit) access your pivot stubs, remove the swingarm and slide out the shaft. On the back of the gear box should be the indicator switch just to the left of the output shaft spline. Well...it is on my K100. Sorry if I'm wrong.

Cheers and kindest regards

Paul Harrington
AU
E: [email protected]

1999 K1200LT Champagne "Bismarck"
1983 base K100 "Bavarian Belle"
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post #3 of 7 Old Aug 11th, 2007, 4:20 pm Thread Starter
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Talking Mission Impossible - Possible

Paul,

Thanks for the input.

But you guys down under must love extensive teardowns. After reading your thoughts about changing the gear indicator switch on the transmission by tearing the entire rear end out of the bike, I was ready to say; I'll do without!

But, before I threw the switch back in the cage to return it to BMW, I thought I'd take a look at other non traditional options. I discovered that the switch change out can be far easier than your suggested approach.

Here's how I did it.

1) Remove the tupperware on the clutch side including the lower fairing.
2) Remove the exhaust system
3) Remove the shift linkage pivot from the frame cross member
4) Remove the reverse gear rod support bracket.
5) Support the rear wheel and remove the rear drive strut bolt from the frame cross member.
6) Remove the throttle side driver foot peg mounting plate.
7) Remove the 6 bolts holding the frame cross member and the cross member.
8) Loosen the clutch fluid line from the reservoir (don't remove). It will dribble a little fluid, but since its on the reservoir side you won't loose the bleed on the clutch slave cylinder.
9) Squeeze the two ends of the spring retainting clip on the gear indicator switch with a pair of pliers and pull off.
10) Disconnect the electrical connector above the anti-lock brake unit and route the cable down and out the bottom of the bike.

Reassembly is the reverse order.

As I pulled the switch off it was obvious why mine had been intermitant for over a year. The plastic housing crumbled in my hand and the electrical contacts were visible and green with corrosion. Because the switch is directly above the catalytic converter it heat soaks when the bike is stopped. After I install my new switch I warped it with 3-mil adhesive backed Aluminum foil tape as a reflective barrier in hopes of reducing the heat soaking (TBD if it makes a difference).

If I were doing any kind of trans or clutch work, I'd recommend replacing the switch (even if it seem to be working). But, it is definitely possible to replace the switch without tearing down the rear wheel and drive unit as suggested.

I have 70K miles on my bike and have never been into it for trans seals or clutch issues. If and when I do need this, I'll definitely plan on replacing this switch to avoid going back in to do it a few months later.

Thanks again for you input Paul. I think I simply found a easier way.

Vern
(LTmagic)
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post #4 of 7 Old Aug 11th, 2007, 6:11 pm
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Shazaam!!! Did you know going in that this path would give you the room you needed, or were you working on hope/faith when you pulled the exhaust? Also, you clearly were able to get at the banjo bolts on the slave cylinder, could one have gotten to the mounting bolts and pulled the slave? Niiice job.

Bill
Guilford, CT
'99 Canyon Red K1200 LT - Buddah Bike
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post #5 of 7 Old Aug 12th, 2007, 10:44 am Thread Starter
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Bill,

I had the exhaust system off for other reasons, so I was able to make a shoot from the hip judgement that it could be done

I don't think you can get the clutch slave apart (other may disagree) because the swingarm is directly behind it. The gear switch was slightly higher up than the slave. The clutch fill line was difficult to reach and break loose because there is little room for a standard allen wrench. But, breaking it loose is all you need to do so the line does not trap the switch in place. Once changed, you simply tighten the clutch line again, which traps the switch. Bottom line is, its more than possible to do.

Like most things on the LT, you have to remove a lot of other parts to access your problem area.
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post #6 of 7 Old Aug 12th, 2007, 4:14 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old1951

But you guys down under must love extensive teardowns. After reading your thoughts about changing the gear indicator switch on the transmission by tearing the entire rear end out of the bike, I was ready to say; I'll do without!


Here's how I did it.

1) Remove the tupperware on the clutch side including the lower fairing.
2) Remove the exhaust system
3) Remove the shift linkage pivot from the frame cross member
4) Remove the reverse gear rod support bracket.
5) Support the rear wheel and remove the rear drive strut bolt from the frame cross member.
6) Remove the throttle side driver foot peg mounting plate.
7) Remove the 6 bolts holding the frame cross member and the cross member.
8) Loosen the clutch fluid line from the reservoir (don't remove). It will dribble a little fluid, but since its on the reservoir side you won't loose the bleed on the clutch slave cylinder.
9) Squeeze the two ends of the spring retainting clip on the gear indicator switch with a pair of pliers and pull off.
10) Disconnect the electrical connector above the anti-lock brake unit and route the cable down and out the bottom of the bike.

Reassembly is the reverse order.

(LTmagic)

Kind of an oxymoron here is it? Hates extensive tear downs but then does all that work.

I find the rear drive and swingarm a much quicker removal.

John
2009 K1300GT Red Rocket
2009 R1200GS (Gone)
2005 K1200LT Ocean Blue Blue Wizard 110 K and counting...
2006 Bushtec Turbo+2 Spell
2004 330 Ci Convertable
K4AN

Have ridden a Motorcycle in all 48
But lack DE, MA, RI and CT with the 2005 LT

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post #7 of 7 Old Aug 13th, 2007, 1:52 am
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Greetings again.

The procedure I described was for my '83 K100. The gear indicator switch is located tight behind the swingarm against the gearbox rear wall. The only way to access it is by removing the singarm...pretty easy in the early K's.

It appears the location of the LT's gear indicator switch is a little higher on the gearbox rear wall than the early K's, making the procedure a little different...and easier.

Kindest regards to all

Paul Harrington
AU

1999 K1200LT Champagne "Bismarck"
1983 base K100 "Bavarian Belle"
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