tire pressure and low speed handling - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 8 Old Oct 9th, 2006, 5:01 pm Thread Starter
JDW
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Urbana, IL., USA
Posts: 49
Smile tire pressure and low speed handling

I have an 03 LT and love it but sometimes find the low speed handling a little awkward. It really hasn't been a problem but I was wondering if increasing the tire pressure might make it a little more responsive at parking lot speeds. Currently I run 38 front and 43 back but i see a lot of posts recommending 42 front and 48 rear.
JDW is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 Old Oct 9th, 2006, 5:13 pm
Senior Member
 
Prin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Posts: 311
Smile Tire Pressure

Hi JD!

Saw ur post about tire pressures. I've got an 02 with 100K on the clock. I find that for parking lot maneuvers (like taking an ERC class, etc.) that I boost my tire pressures to 45/50 (front/back). It seems to make my bike more responsive for making those tight, slow speed turns. For normal cruising, I usually run 42/46. This seems to give me a little more rubber on the road at high speeds, especially when in a turn. Now I am no engineer or scientist by any means, but this is just based on the way my bike feels. I usually get around 15K-18K miles from a rear tire and around 25K-30K out of a front tire. I hope this helps some. If not, then it's back to the drawing board!

Dave
American by Birth,
Biker by Choice,
Patriot Forever!
Prin is offline  
post #3 of 8 Old Oct 9th, 2006, 7:29 pm
Senior Member
 
UncleRock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New Alexandria, PA, USA
Posts: 1,633
If doing any slab work I run 48+51 (Learned that from Joe)
Playing on back roads I will drop out as much as 8 lbs, then pump back up when done playing.
Rock
UncleRock is offline  
 
post #4 of 8 Old Oct 9th, 2006, 7:41 pm
Senior Member
 
BillCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 216
Tire pressure and wear

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prin
Hi JD!

Saw ur post about tire pressures. I've got an 02 with 100K on the clock. I find that for parking lot maneuvers (like taking an ERC class, etc.) that I boost my tire pressures to 45/50 (front/back). It seems to make my bike more responsive for making those tight, slow speed turns. For normal cruising, I usually run 42/46. This seems to give me a little more rubber on the road at high speeds, especially when in a turn. Now I am no engineer or scientist by any means, but this is just based on the way my bike feels. I usually get around 15K-18K miles from a rear tire and around 25K-30K out of a front tire. I hope this helps some. If not, then it's back to the drawing board!
Dave,
I agree with you on the pressures, you have to keep them up to prevent feathering or cupping. I just put 4000 miles on a new rear metzeler and at 50 psi have not a sign of cupping or feathering.

I'm quite amazed at you saying that you get 25 to 30 K out of your front tire. I thought I was doing good at 17000 miles on the front tire.

Bill,
Ocean Blue
05 K1200 LT
BillCav is offline  
post #5 of 8 Old Oct 9th, 2006, 8:16 pm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Shelton, CT, USA
Posts: 2,341
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDW
I have an 03 LT and love it but sometimes find the low speed handling a little awkward. It really hasn't been a problem but I was wondering if increasing the tire pressure might make it a little more responsive at parking lot speeds. Currently I run 38 front and 43 back but i see a lot of posts recommending 42 front and 48 rear.
Running 10% down in low speed will help with grip and traction especially if you are doing a lot of low speed turning and maneuvering.. Like in a handling class.. The lower pressure will cause the tire to heat quickly . Warm tires will give you the best and surest grip leaned over in aggressive low speed maneuvering.

However, most riders will find that a constant lower pressure will induce excessive tire wear. I find it impractical to adjust tire pressure for a specific riding task.. The only notable exception would be a 'rider class' where you expect that you will do intermittent riding on a 'low speed' course.

IMHO you need to practice low speed maneuvering ... and when you think you have it then take advanced rider classes ... experience will do a much better job of giving you the confidence more than 'low/lower' tire pressure will.

JM2CW

Jack D. (Southern Connecticut)
2001 Black LTC
2015 Blue R1200GSA
jackd is offline  
post #6 of 8 Old Oct 10th, 2006, 12:29 am Thread Starter
JDW
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Urbana, IL., USA
Posts: 49
Smile

Thanks to everyone for their imput. I have taken the advance riding course and dont realy disagree about practicing the maneuvers. I was just curious about the tire pressure thing. Changing the rake in the newer LT s seemed to help a little and since I cant change the steering geometry I thought tire pressure especially the front might make some maneuvers a little easier. I guess the only way to find out for sure is practice doing manuevers with different pressures and see if there is any difference.
Thanks again

Last edited by JDW; Oct 10th, 2006 at 12:40 am.
JDW is offline  
post #7 of 8 Old Oct 10th, 2006, 1:13 am
Super Moderator
 
dfinazzo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Waconia, MN, USA
Posts: 1,355
Cool Tire pressure from an engineer and more!!

At CCR 2006 the Bridgestone tire engineer during the seminar made a recommendation for most bikes as follows:

1. Read the maximum tire pressure and set your pressure to 2# under that

2. Was very nervous about recommending Bridgestone Radials for the K1200 - too fat!!

3. Recommended Bridgestone Bias Ply

4. If you want mileage go with Metzlers - if you want rain handling tires go with Bridgestones.

5. Stated that the BMW K1200LT is the "only" bike with rims that can run either radials or bias ply. No other bike at this time has rims that qualifies to run both type tires. Thus, on other bikes if the bike came with radials you must keep them on the bike and the same holds true for bias ply tires.

6. FWIW - He also stated that riding styles dictate tire wear - period. Riding down south with heavy loads an aggressive rider will certainly wear out a tire before a one up conservative rider up north. Road temperatures and loads develop higher tire temperatures and result in faster wear - all things being equal!

7. Lastly just to keep things in perspective - remember your bike is riding on air pressure not the tires!! This will certainly help you keep focused on proper tire pressure all the time!!

8. Oh and I did ask a loaded question and got an unexpected answer. The question was "Would you ride on a patched tire? - with our hesitation he said yes!! But gave a qualifier: must be away from the side wall, entrance and exit puncture must be clean and away from the cords and use only mushroom style plug patches. New adhesives are self vulcanizing and when properly applied become part of the tire during heat up cycles. If you use the tire patch materials as supplied by BMW this does not qualify and you should only ride on the tire for a limited time. He had examples of tires that showed these plugs allow moisture to get between the layers on the tire (during cool down) and after repeated heating cycles large chunks of tread would come flying off - totally away from the repair site.

9. On last thing (as Steve Jobs would say) - if you have trouble with your tires do not rely on the dealer to know anything or have your best interests. He actually got up on the stage and kneeled down in a praying position and said contact him - he can help, he wants data and he can assist!!

10. So who was this guy - he did not pass out business cards but I looked up technical assistance and looks like you can email the following person to start to get answers: [email protected]

Dan Finazzo
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


"Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted to get"

Last edited by dfinazzo; Oct 10th, 2006 at 1:25 am. Reason: spelling
dfinazzo is offline  
post #8 of 8 Old Oct 10th, 2006, 2:34 am
IBR# 366
 
meese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: West Linn, OR
Posts: 16,405
Garage
One other consideration is tire profile and construction.

The Avon Radial front has a very triangular profile which equates to sharp handling at slow and fast speeds. Some folks even complain that it's too squirrely on the highway or in harsh winds, but I think it just feels quick and predictable in all situations.

In contrast, the ME880 Bias front has a much less pointed profile and a stiff construction. This makes the bike feel more stable to some, but sluggish and unresponsive to others, like me.

The BT020 Radial has a mid-way profile and so handles better than the ME880 but not as good as the Avon. The BT020 Bias has a similar profile but different construction, so it falls between the BT020 Radial and ME880 Bias in terms of handling and mileage.

It all depend what your priorities are, and what you expect from a tire.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 63K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#143, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
meese is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the BMW Luxury Touring Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome