Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 35Likes
  • 3 Post By Scouter-50
  • 2 Post By FlyOrBike
  • 2 Post By saddleman
  • 3 Post By Hilton
  • 1 Post By Dick
  • 3 Post By sailor
  • 3 Post By Voyager
  • 2 Post By beech
  • 1 Post By LeeBee
  • 1 Post By ALL4BMW
  • 1 Post By sailor
  • 2 Post By Voyager
  • 5 Post By dshealey
  • 1 Post By MikeERideWNC
  • 5 Post By Dick
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 1:52 pm Thread Starter
Lifetime Supporter
 
ALL4BMW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 97
Garage
Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Hello fellow riders! There might be a thread about this already, but I am so desperate, that I did not even search for it. Sorry! While performing my first oil change on my 99 K1200LT, all was going well until I started tighten the screws that covers the oil filter. I set the torque meter to 11Nm. The thing never clicked, and the screw broke apart. Most of it inside. The other two were hand tighten. Question here is: 1)How can I remove the screw from inside without damaging anything else? 2) After removed, will a new screw work? 3) Can the cover hold without any leaks with only two screws? I did not fill with oil, afraid it will leak. Since you guys are the experts here, I welcome your comments. Thank you for your guidance.
ALL4BMW is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 2:17 pm
Senior Member
 
Scouter-50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Columbus, Texas, USA
Posts: 1,285
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALL4BMW View Post
Hello fellow riders! There might be a thread about this already, but I am so desperate, that I did not even search for it. Sorry! While performing my first oil change on my 99 K1200LT, all was going well until I started tighten the screws that covers the oil filter. I set the torque meter to 11Nm. The thing never clicked, and the screw broke apart. Most of it inside. The other two were hand tighten. Question here is: 1)How can I remove the screw from inside without damaging anything else? 2) After removed, will a new screw work? 3) Can the cover hold without any leaks with only two screws? I did not fill with oil, afraid it will leak. Since you guys are the experts here, I welcome your comments. Thank you for your guidance.
Put the bike on the side stand. See if you can find a drill bit with a left hand twist. Center punch the broken bolt well. (Start with an automatic center punch then progress to a sharp one.) Drill slowly and sometimes you can get the broken off piece to back out with the left hand bit. Make sure the hole is centered and don't drill too deeply, I believe that the bolt is in a blind hole. You can then try an easy out if it has not backed out.

If there is any bolt sticking out of the case you can cut a screwdriver slot with a Dremel tool and unscrew the stub.

Another method I have used is to place a slightly oversized nut on what is left then weld in the center of the nut to the stub.

There are also special bits that you can get at some auto suppliers that have the left hand bit with a built in easy out.

Good luck.

Robert
LeeBee, ALL4BMW and lucasindus like this.

They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)


2000 K1200LT "Latifah"
1994 R1100RSL (wife's)
1981 R80GS
1976 R90S
1965 R80/2 Frankenbike (wife's)
2001 Bunkhouse LX (given to son)
2011 Bunkhouse Queen

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Scouter-50 is offline  
post #3 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 2:36 pm Thread Starter
Lifetime Supporter
 
ALL4BMW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 97
Garage
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Thank you, Robert! I will try all those, and shall revert back. Thank you for the input. I see that I can buy one of those easy-outs you are referring to. Perhaps, not a bad idea to have a set. Next time, I will hand tighten these screws, and check for leaks.

Ride safe,

Jerry
ALL4BMW is offline  
 
post #4 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 3:31 pm
Member
 
FlyOrBike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Concord, NC, United States
Posts: 38
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

The left hand drill is worth trying. Sometimes that's all it takes.

Sometimes it is a problem to start the drill on center without buggering up the threads of the hole. You might use the cover to make a drill-guide out of mild steel. Two holes will match the existing holes for the good screws and the third hole--sized for the drill and carefully placed--will hold the drill centered. Bolt it up and use it to start the drill on center, then remove and check you are actually in the center.

I never use torque wrenches on screws like that. You only need them tight enough to compress the o-ring, which does not take much tightening.
-Kent
ALL4BMW and mcracer like this.
FlyOrBike is offline  
post #5 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 4:03 pm
Enjoy The Ride
 
saddleman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Huntersville, NC, USA
Posts: 3,879
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

That screw should be aluminum & easy to drill. You might be able to remove the other two screws & remove the cover & use a vise grip if any of the broken screw is not flush.
ALL4BMW and rosmba like this.

Dave Selvig
2004 Black LT
2000 Canon Red LT



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
saddleman is offline  
post #6 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 5:34 pm
Miles of Smiles
 
Hilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Touring Europe
Posts: 1,038
Garage
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Sorry to hear about your broken bolt.
The cover bolts torque up to 10 Nm.
The filter to 11Nm.
Early days many people broke these bolts.
The O-ring doesn't require very much pressure to seal,
just be sure to seat it properly in the groove, prior to tightening.
These bolts are very close to the braking point even at 10Nm.
David Shealey sourced some replacement ones with a slightly higher rating.
I include his early comments:

"Also, a number of people have had the heads of the filter bolts snap off, even using a torque wrench!

I sold quite a large number of sets of better screws to prevent them breaking. The standard ISO grade 8.8 screws BMW uses are just about at their limit when tightened to the stated 10NM. The grade 12.9 ones I was selling are not even close at that torque. (The grade number is stamped into the head of the screw)

From a major metric fastener company's technical data:
Tightening torque, lubricated, for a M6 screw to reach 90% yield value of the screw:

Grade 8.8=9.9 NM
Grade 12.9=16.5 NM

You can see that BMW is recommending a torque for the standard grade 8.8 screw that will go over 90% of the yield rating for the screw! That leaves NO room for error. 10% overtightening can easily overcome the yield strength of the screw."

Good luck removing the bolt.
__________________
beech, LeeBee and ALL4BMW like this.

Jenna: Ocean Blue '06
Hilton: Head of the Steering Committee.
Rena: The Committee.
ET4 Thing 1
ET4 Thing 2
Hilton is offline  
post #7 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 5:42 pm Thread Starter
Lifetime Supporter
 
ALL4BMW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 97
Garage
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Great input, and thorough explanation, thank you as well. I will try the left hand drill, and easy out if the first option does not work. I want to replace those three screws for stronger ones, and now am not sure where to get them. I was considering contacting the local BMW motorcycle dealer.

Jerry
ALL4BMW is offline  
post #8 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 6:42 pm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 14,435
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALL4BMW View Post
Great input, and thorough explanation, thank you as well. I will try the left hand drill, and easy out if the first option does not work. I want to replace those three screws for stronger ones, and now am not sure where to get them. I was considering contacting the local BMW motorcycle dealer.

Jerry
Hi, Jerry. I doubt a BMW dealer is gonna have *stronger* socket head bolts other than OEM. I 'think' David sourced the replacement socket head bolts from McMaster Carr. You can search on their site for the 12.9 socket head bolt description. May have to buy a package of +/- 100 pieces. McMaster-Carr
Jerry, I've got two extra of those bolts if you'd like 'em. Just PM me your address and I'll send them tomorrow. You can add the third if you order more.
ALL4BMW likes this.
Dick is offline  
post #9 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 6:45 pm
Senior Member
 
sailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Montreal ,QC , Canada
Posts: 1,162
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALL4BMW View Post
Great input, and thorough explanation, thank you as well. I will try the left hand drill, and easy out if the first option does not work. I want to replace those three screws for stronger ones, and now am not sure where to get them. I was considering contacting the local BMW motorcycle dealer.

Jerry
Think twice before you put stronger screws/bolts. In this case a weak alloy serves as a fuse and will break before you strip the treads of the oil lower engine sump. Of course you will gain some margin of errors with a better bolt, but when some rough guy goes there without a torque wrench, he will really make a lot more damage.

Much easier to remove remaining of a broken SMALL screw/bolt than redo the stripped treads (or helicoil) of the lower sump. Since these 3 bolts are fairly short and have little diameter and little torque, in most cases removing the remaining part is fairly easy.
Patric, beech and ALL4BMW like this.

-------------------------------------------------
John (Montreal, CANADA)
K1200RS (2002 IceBlue/Red - 96,000 miles)
-------------------------------------------------
Think twice before you hit [SUBMIT REPLY] - famous quote by another member:
"The value of this board is not founded on dismissing the ideas of others, but by posting to share our experiences and what we've learned from them."
sailor is offline  
post #10 of 23 Old Feb 21st, 2016, 6:53 pm Thread Starter
Lifetime Supporter
 
ALL4BMW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 97
Garage
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Hello Dick, I am truly impressed with the level of guidance and friendliness here at BMWLT. I did read great reviews, and am now living that moment. Certainly, I will PM you. I did access the website, and looked for the M6 bolt, but could not identify the length, but know is partial thread. I certainly appreciate your kindness. you guys are all experts, and I hope to someday be able to contribute and re-tribute this generosity to another fellow rider.

Ride safe.

Jerry
ALL4BMW is offline  
post #11 of 23 Old Feb 22nd, 2016, 7:45 am
Lifetime Supporter
 
Voyager's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Lawrenceville, PA, USA
Posts: 7,083
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailor View Post
Think twice before you put stronger screws/bolts. In this case a weak alloy serves as a fuse and will break before you strip the treads of the oil lower engine sump. Of course you will gain some margin of errors with a better bolt, but when some rough guy goes there without a torque wrench, he will really make a lot more damage.

Much easier to remove remaining of a broken SMALL screw/bolt than redo the stripped treads (or helicoil) of the lower sump. Since these 3 bolts are fairly short and have little diameter and little torque, in most cases removing the remaining part is fairly easy.
100% agree with Sailor. BMW made these screws weak for a reason. You don't want the screw to be stronger than the threads in the engine case. Stay stock and tighten by hand or set the torque wrench to 8-9 Nm. You are using a small torque wrench, right? You generally want to size your wrench so that you aren't at the bottom edge of its range. Better to use a wrench where the desired torque is at least 20% above the low end of the scale and being above 50% is desirable.
sailor, beech and ALL4BMW like this.

2017 KLR650 "Mule"
2007 K1200LT "Starship Enterprise", VOICE II, Navigator V, Motorrad Communicator
1987 Kawasaki Voyager XII
1976 Kawasaki KH400
1973 Kawasaki 100 G5
1970 Rockford Chibi (the orange one)

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Voyager is online now  
post #12 of 23 Old Feb 22nd, 2016, 12:50 pm
Senior Member
 
beech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Mount Vernon, WA, USA
Posts: 2,514
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Voyager is oh so correct about using a low range torque wrench. This is such a low level of torque that it is easy to get into trouble. My small wrench is 150 inch/lbs or about 17 Nm. full scale. Also tighten the three screws evenly in stages, not just tighten one up and move to the next. The teeter totter effect with this cover and O-ring could mess with things here.
Worst case, you may need to drop the pan, it is not major. Owning a set of left hand drill bits is almost more useful that easy outs.
sailor and ALL4BMW like this.

Beech
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

I change your tires $50, you buy them on the web.
K13S, S1000R (gone through a few GS's & RT's)
beech is offline  
post #13 of 23 Old Feb 22nd, 2016, 12:57 pm
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 21
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

I have a set of these, they are left hand bits.

Shop SpeedOut 4-Piece Screw Extractor Set at Lowes.com

They work well for me as long as the bolt isn't rusted in place or cross threaded.

Lee B

PS - make sure that the center punch mark is as close to center as you can get. I also have a set of transfer punches which are handy for marking the bolt.
ALL4BMW likes this.
LeeBee is offline  
post #14 of 23 Old Feb 22nd, 2016, 9:09 pm Thread Starter
Lifetime Supporter
 
ALL4BMW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 97
Garage
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

@ Voyager! I was not using a small wrench but now I have learned the lesson the hard way.

To all, I have finally removed the broken screw with an extractor from Sears. Was able to drill into the screw, and pull it off with the other side of the extractor. The thread looks just fine, and ready for another bolt. I will soon be on the road again. I will hand tight the oil filter cover, and then turn just a bit more. As to the oil filter, I did the same thing. Hand tight, and just a bit more. Hopefully I will be fine. Final drive oil change done withour challenges, and next, Transmission fluid.

I would like to thank everyone's input and feedback and help. You guys have done such a great job. Thank you for your seriousness in trying to help.

Regards, and ride safe.

Jerry
Patric likes this.
ALL4BMW is offline  
post #15 of 23 Old Feb 22nd, 2016, 10:46 pm
Guest
 
11862's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: minnetonka , mn, usa
Posts: 637
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Those of us with an agricultural background have to be careful with Metric fasteners as they are finer threads than the corresponding UNC inch fasteners we are all familiar with. And click type torque wrenches have such a long handle that we are not very likely to not strip something if we don't happen to hear the click, or if we are out of good click range. There's many a time to not use a torque wrench too.

Suggestions - Lay the bike on its side wing for better drilling access and alignment. Start drilling with a very tiny bit carefully steered so that there is a good starting center to work with. Smaller bits will drill into that hard steel much easier. You can follow with a larger bit without much drill effort then.

A left hand final bit is best, but if you try an EZ-out instead, be careful as if you snap it off you really have a problem. They are so brittle and hard you can't drill it out any more. Good luck!
11862 is offline  
post #16 of 23 Old Feb 22nd, 2016, 11:59 pm
Senior Member
 
want2tour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Sandpoint, ID area
Posts: 275
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALL4BMW View Post
@ Voyager! I was not using a small wrench but now I have learned the lesson the hard way.

To all, I have finally removed the broken screw with an extractor from Sears. Was able to drill into the screw, and pull it off with the other side of the extractor. The thread looks just fine, and ready for another bolt. I will soon be on the road again. I will hand tight the oil filter cover, and then turn just a bit more. As to the oil filter, I did the same thing. Hand tight, and just a bit more. Hopefully I will be fine. Final drive oil change done withour challenges, and next, Transmission fluid.

I would like to thank everyone's input and feedback and help. You guys have done such a great job. Thank you for your seriousness in trying to help.

Regards, and ride safe.

Jerry
Tool tip: Best tool I've seen for the transmission drain is the Draper 38327 14mm Hex. 3/8 Sq. Drive Drain Plug Key. Compact size. You don't have much room for a ratchet at the drain and certainly not a torque wrench. You'll have to guess at the torque. This tool is only 1 & 9/16" long. Actually is a mercedes gearbox sump tool. Found it on ebay, had to ship from england so it took a couple of weeks. But it works great. Got the tip from rdepas on the forum. Cost on ebay is $3.99. By the time it get shipping and duties, I think I paid around $20, but I love the tool and easier to carry around and lighter than a 14mm hex key.
bob

2005 KLT Graphite Gray
2003 F650GS Black
*Too slow for fast women
*A little adventure is good for the soul
want2tour is offline  
post #17 of 23 Old Feb 23rd, 2016, 7:02 am
Lifetime Supporter
 
Voyager's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Lawrenceville, PA, USA
Posts: 7,083
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Quote:
Originally Posted by niel_petersen View Post
Those of us with an agricultural background have to be careful with Metric fasteners as they are finer threads than the corresponding UNC inch fasteners we are all familiar with. And click type torque wrenches have such a long handle that we are not very likely to not strip something if we don't happen to hear the click, or if we are out of good click range. There's many a time to not use a torque wrench too.

Suggestions - Lay the bike on its side wing for better drilling access and alignment. Start drilling with a very tiny bit carefully steered so that there is a good starting center to work with. Smaller bits will drill into that hard steel much easier. You can follow with a larger bit without much drill effort then.

A left hand final bit is best, but if you try an EZ-out instead, be careful as if you snap it off you really have a problem. They are so brittle and hard you can't drill it out any more. Good luck!
What are the times to not use a torque wrench? I can think of one which are the tighten too yield fasteners where you torque and then turn to an angle. Once steel yields the torque remains fairly constant so a torque wrench is not very useful. However, in the elastic regime, I can't think of any reason not to use a well calibrated torque wrench.

2017 KLR650 "Mule"
2007 K1200LT "Starship Enterprise", VOICE II, Navigator V, Motorrad Communicator
1987 Kawasaki Voyager XII
1976 Kawasaki KH400
1973 Kawasaki 100 G5
1970 Rockford Chibi (the orange one)

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Voyager is online now  
post #18 of 23 Old Feb 23rd, 2016, 8:04 am
Senior Member
 
sailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Montreal ,QC , Canada
Posts: 1,162
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Quote:
Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
What are the times to not use a torque wrench? I can think of one which are the tighten too yield fasteners where you torque and then turn to an angle. Once steel yields the torque remains fairly constant so a torque wrench is not very useful. However, in the elastic regime, I can't think of any reason not to use a well calibrated torque wrench.
When in my garage, I agree with you: there is no reason NOT to have and use 2 torque-wrenches. One for fairly low value range (5 to 20 NM) and one for larger values (roughly 20 to 100NM).

HOWEVER having worked on my bikes for 30 years, I have learned that sometimes I will be in a situation where no torque-wrench will be available (at someone else garage or on the road). Hence, when in my garage, I like to practice the "feeling" of "can I do it by hand close enough".

My method: I torque it by hand very conservative (lower than normal) and then I finish with the torque-wrench. The amount of added rotation needed with the torque-wrench gives me a feel how close I was to correct value. Of course, I will never use this method for bolts that are "one-time-use" like the clutch main shaft large nut.
Patric likes this.

-------------------------------------------------
John (Montreal, CANADA)
K1200RS (2002 IceBlue/Red - 96,000 miles)
-------------------------------------------------
Think twice before you hit [SUBMIT REPLY] - famous quote by another member:
"The value of this board is not founded on dismissing the ideas of others, but by posting to share our experiences and what we've learned from them."
sailor is offline  
post #19 of 23 Old Feb 23rd, 2016, 8:32 am
Lifetime Supporter
 
Voyager's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Lawrenceville, PA, USA
Posts: 7,083
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailor View Post
When in my garage, I agree with you: there is no reason NOT to have and use 2 torque-wrenches. One for fairly low value range (5 to 20 NM) and one for larger values (roughly 20 to 100NM).

HOWEVER having worked on my bikes for 30 years, I have learned that sometimes I will be in a situation where no torque-wrench will be available (at someone else garage or on the road). Hence, when in my garage, I like to practice the "feeling" of "can I do it by hand close enough".

My method: I torque it by hand very conservative (lower than normal) and then I finish with the torque-wrench. The amount of added rotation needed with the torque-wrench gives me a feel how close I was to correct value. Of course, I will never use this method for bolts that are "one-time-use" like the clutch main shaft large nut.
Well, not having a torque wrench isn't quite the same as not using one, which was the context of the statement. Field repairs are a different class entirely and we often take lots of shortcuts we otherwise wouldn't.


I also generally tighten fasteners by hand to some degree, but getting too close to the desired torque isn't the best practice. Most torque values assume approaching the torque value in a smooth continuous motion. This implies sliding rather than static friction. The mu values can be quite different particularly with unlubricated threads. If you get within 20%, or even less, of the target torque, it is not at all impossible for a torque wrench to hit the final torque value before the fastener moves again due to the force required to overcome the much higher static friction.

http://engineershandbook.com/Tables/...efficients.htm
sailor and Jim_McG like this.

2017 KLR650 "Mule"
2007 K1200LT "Starship Enterprise", VOICE II, Navigator V, Motorrad Communicator
1987 Kawasaki Voyager XII
1976 Kawasaki KH400
1973 Kawasaki 100 G5
1970 Rockford Chibi (the orange one)

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by Voyager; Feb 23rd, 2016 at 8:37 am. Reason: Add link
Voyager is online now  
post #20 of 23 Old Feb 23rd, 2016, 8:15 pm
Senior Member
 
dshealey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Dandridge (Near Knoxville), TN, USA
Posts: 12,165
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

I still have several sets available. I did not get them from McMaster Carr, but from Bossard, one of the largest European metric suppliers. They are Dacromet coated, class 12.9, and will not strip tightened to the specified torque like the stock class 8.8's may and have. Will withstand considerably more torque than specified. And no, it will not strip the aluminum case unless you REALLY Gorrilla them.

If anyone wants some, I have sold a LOT of them (over 200 sets) three screws with 4 washers, $5 for one set mailed, $3 for each additional set mailed at the same time.
I include an extra washer, because it is not a standard hardware store washer, smaller O.D. matching the O.D. of the stock, but not attached like stock, so possible to loose one.

PM me for PayPal address.
Dick, Hilton, DanDiver and 2 others like this.
dshealey is offline  
post #21 of 23 Old Feb 26th, 2016, 12:47 pm Thread Starter
Lifetime Supporter
 
ALL4BMW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 97
Garage
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

All is back to normal. Received bolt in the mail from fellow rider, Dick, oil is in, and ready to ride. Thank you, everyone, for the great feedback.

Jerry


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
ALL4BMW is offline  
post #22 of 23 Old Feb 27th, 2016, 6:42 am
Senior Member
 
MikeERideWNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Murphy, NC, USA
Posts: 793
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Thanks Dick.
This is one of the few forums where it is often seen of others helping out.

Great to hear that you are back to good.
ALL4BMW likes this.

Visit
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
_ Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but always enough time to do it over?
MikeERideWNC is offline  
post #23 of 23 Old Feb 27th, 2016, 9:48 am
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 14,435
Re: Oil Filter Cover - Broken Screw

Hi, Mike. Since '07, you've been a part of the helpful philosophy embedded in this site - a philosophy that began back in the day - "It's what we do." Further displayed by Gary Rollins' classic CCR statement "It's the bike (K1200LT) that brought us together, but it's the people who keep us together." Me and ole Toad are proud and blessed to be a part of this site too - and glad that the site co-founders (Randy and Andy) broadened the scope of helping by adding more BMW model categories and their owners to participate in the knowledge base and grow the camaraderie. Best to you always, Mike.
DanMartin, sailor, ibbones and 2 others like this.
Dick is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the BMW Luxury Touring Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Oil Change Packages NeoGeo RT Series 48 Aug 10th, 2019 12:21 pm
Swapped in used motor, cracked timing chain cover, oil leak westvandude K1200LT 15 Oct 31st, 2018 4:21 pm
Oil Filter Really Stuck! mabden K1200LT 19 Mar 23rd, 2014 11:30 am
BMW oil and filter mad1 RT Series 19 Aug 12th, 2008 7:26 pm
Oil Filter Cover screw shipment delayed dshealey K1200LT 6 Jun 10th, 2006 4:57 pm

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome