Center stand difficulty - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 20 Old Sep 15th, 2006, 10:05 pm Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Schweintechnik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Carlisle, PA, USA
Posts: 269
Question Center stand difficulty

I just bought an '03 LTC (yippeeee!!!) and parked it in the garage for the first time tonight. When I tried to put it on the center stand, I just about threw my back out. Bike was in neutral, hbars straight, head turned to the rear, body close to the bike, using body weight to push down on center stand pedal while grabbing handle under seat, etc. I was about to give up, but on my final Hurculean effort, with an extra grunt, it slowly moved past the magic point and landed into position.

Earlier, I test drove a buddy's '99 LTC, and his went up on the center stand with no problem at all.

Is there something I'm missing? Rear suspension preload adjustment? Am I gonna have to fiddle with a wooden block everywhere I want to park this thing?
Schweintechnik is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 20 Old Sep 15th, 2006, 11:13 pm
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 4,905
My knee-jerk answer is to tell you to get a friend on the right side of the bike and practice some putting it up on the stand. Your technique sounds spot on, but perhaps you just need to tweak it just a tad. I can practically put any pre-'05 LT up on it's centerstand with my leg only. I just grab the left saddlebag's handle for a little extra stability. I'm thinking you need to tweak where or how you're pushing down with the foot. The magic's all in the leg and foot. But it seems like you already know this.

Don't give up man. Perfect practice makes perfect.
messenger13 is offline  
post #3 of 20 Old Sep 15th, 2006, 11:26 pm
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 89
I had the same problem....the difference-maker for me was to make sure that both 'feet' of the center stand was making contact with the floor and that the LT was balanced on both feet...woila the bike goes back a 100 times easier.

My problem is that I was trying to pull up and back only on one of the feet of the stand.

Give 'er a try.
Safedog is offline  
 
post #4 of 20 Old Sep 16th, 2006, 1:10 am
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 461
Also had the same problem, until I finally realized you have to have the nerve to lean the bike away from you until both feet of the stand are down, and then to shift all your weight to the right foot when putting it up. Now on a good level surface, the bike jumps up on the center stand.
Ghost55 is offline  
post #5 of 20 Old Sep 16th, 2006, 1:52 am
IBR# 366
 
meese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: West Linn, OR
Posts: 16,427
Garage
How many miles on the bike?

Proper technique is important, as stated above. But you can also have issues with weakened shocks, flattened tires, and maybe just a tight center stand that need a little grease.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 63K miles
'03 Anthracite Metallic K12LTC, 66K miles
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#143, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
meese is offline  
post #6 of 20 Old Sep 16th, 2006, 6:53 am
Senior Member
 
surfran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Finger Lakes Region, NY, USA
Posts: 315
I would also add that for me it's more of a pull backwards rather than up with my right hand on the handle (not side case handle). When I first got it I was trying to lift it also NO GO I can't lift that much. When I finally figured it out and use the weight pull back technique, mine JUMPS up as well.

And the others are right you must have it balanced on both feet which is kind of scary to begin with and very difficult if you are not on a solid surface. I tried putting mine on the center stand a few times at my lake cottage on a 1/8" aluminum plate (~1'w x 3'L) and dropped it over to the right side since it had too much play and I couldn't tell I had touch down on the other foot before I had went to far. Luckily it missed my truck by about 6"

Joe's suggestion about having someone on the other side for insurance will give you the confidence to do it and get comfortable, but even if you dont' have someone, just go easy and you should be fine.

Good luck,

Randy

2000 Canyon Red "Crimson Cruiser"
40,000 miles grinning, and counting....
BMWMOA # 131660
surfran is offline  
post #7 of 20 Old Sep 18th, 2006, 4:39 pm
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 37
Center Stand

Practice, practice; and practice somemore.
longbow is offline  
post #8 of 20 Old Sep 18th, 2006, 7:43 pm
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Xenia, OH, USA
Posts: 74
Random center stand thoughts:
Am I the only one who puts the bike on the center stand while still astride it? Maybe being 6'6", 230 helps, but I just put all of my weight on the stand through my left leg/foot and shift my weight back while pulling on the handle bars. If she doesn't go up on the first try, I grab the brake at the apex and give another tug.
Most parking lots have some grade to them. Pointing the bike into the uphill slope makes this much easier.
At home, I have a one inch thick piece of wood on the garage floor to put the front wheel on. With the front wheel elevated, the bike goes on the center stand much easier.
The service manager at the now defunct BMW of Cincinnati was not a big guy and I was always amazed at how easily he could put the LT on the center stand. I guess with practice and good technique it's not as hard as I make it.

Steve
2004 LT
xenia is offline  
post #9 of 20 Old Sep 18th, 2006, 7:45 pm
Senior Member
 
RonKMiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Tucson, AZ, USA
Posts: 6,279
Put your left hand on the left handlebar grip, LEFT foot on the centerstand pad, face the rear with your left hip touching the seat, right hand on the sidecase grip - not the grab bar under the seat.

Stand up straight with your back arched (instead of hunched over) putting equal force on both arms and your leg. It will almost fly up by itself...

Any other method is guraranteed to mess up your back.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
"Like Butt-ahh!"
RonKMiller is offline  
post #10 of 20 Old Sep 18th, 2006, 9:23 pm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Edmonton, AB, Canada
Posts: 1,033
The big problem many people have to get over is making sure the bike is straight up and down before putting it on the stand. Subconsciously leaning the bike against your body for support means that it isn't horizontal but at an angle. Get a buddy to stand on the other side of the bike to give it support. That way you can experiment with getting the bike aligned properly before putting it up on the center stand. I know for me, the first couple of times I tried to put it up on the center stand, a perfectly square position actually felt like the bike was going to fall over the other way. Once I got used to the fact that the bike wasn't actually leaning away from me but was square, it popped up on the center stand just like nothing to it. ron
ronk1200lt is offline  
post #11 of 20 Old Sep 19th, 2006, 5:48 am
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: St. Louis, MO, USA
Posts: 697
One more thing to consider is the condition of your rear shock. If it's flat the feet on the center stand will be that much closer to the ground and make it harder to swing the bike up over the top.

Bill McAllister
St. Louis, MO.
2003 K1200LTE
McAllister is offline  
post #12 of 20 Old Sep 19th, 2006, 7:27 am
Senior Member
 
Seagull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: York, , UK
Posts: 140
The slightest slope on the surface can make a big difference to using the centre stand, I try to avoid leaving my LT on an uphill slope even though it makes it easier to put on the stand, it makes it a pain to get off ! Having said that I always sit astride the bike to get it off, it's much more managable for me. I have tried the 'stand at the left and lift' method with a friend as backup on the opposite side and I really didn't feel confident enough to try it on my own. I'm only 5' 10" and weigh in at 11 stone, I need to be cautious.

Quote:
Put your left hand on the left handlebar grip, LEFT foot on the centerstand pad, face the rear with your left hip touching the seat, right hand on the sidecase grip - not the grab bar under the seat.
That may be worth a try.

2002 K1200LT SE
Seagull is offline  
post #13 of 20 Old Sep 19th, 2006, 7:53 am
Senior Member
 
unleashd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Oak Hill, VA, USA
Posts: 353
Congratulations on the new bike!!!

There are many different opinions on how to get it on the centerstand. Find the one that suits you and practice it over and over!! You'll get find that it is not a "Herculean" task at all!!

Oh, btw, come on over to the Tech/Garage day in No. VA on 10/7. Details are here http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13580


Quote:
Originally Posted by dtnicks
I just bought an '03 LTC (yippeeee!!!) and parked it in the garage for the first time tonight. When I tried to put it on the center stand, I just about threw my back out. Bike was in neutral, hbars straight, head turned to the rear, body close to the bike, using body weight to push down on center stand pedal while grabbing handle under seat, etc. I was about to give up, but on my final Hurculean effort, with an extra grunt, it slowly moved past the magic point and landed into position.

Earlier, I test drove a buddy's '99 LTC, and his went up on the center stand with no problem at all.

Is there something I'm missing? Rear suspension preload adjustment? Am I gonna have to fiddle with a wooden block everywhere I want to park this thing?

Prakash Krishnamurthy

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

2004 R1150RT Titanium Grey

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
unleashd is offline  
post #14 of 20 Old Sep 22nd, 2006, 12:10 pm Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Schweintechnik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Carlisle, PA, USA
Posts: 269
Seagull -

I agree that the slightest slope makes a huge difference. I tried parking my bike in opposite directions in the garage, but it was just as difficult in either direction. I checked the floor with a 4' level, and it's almost dead level where the bike is.

I parked it on a street, at about a 60 degree angle to the curb, with the front wheel facing the middle of the street, and it was MUCH easier - perhaps there was some slope toward the curb. I parked it at work, with a noticeable slope toward the rear of the bike, and it was easier there too (although I almost couldn't get it off the centerstand after work!!)

I put a 3/4" board under the rear wheel and tried it in the garage again, with a lot better results. But I'm hoping to avoid having to block up the rear wheel all the time.

I'm pretty sure my technique is correct - especially making sure the bike is vertical, evenly across both center stand feet before trying. I've gotten to the point where I get all set up, then in one decisive "go for it" move, I give it all I've got and it usually makes it over the hump. But even then, sometimes it doesn't quite make it.

I'm hoping that some investigation of my rear shock will reveal an adjustment or replacement that will make the process as easy as it sounds for most other folks.
Schweintechnik is offline  
post #15 of 20 Old Sep 22nd, 2006, 2:28 pm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: mount airy (mayberry), NC,
Posts: 1,155
Looking at your avatar pic, the problem is YOU ARE ONLY 8!!!! Sorry, couldn't help that one. I've been working on my technique on that too. MAking sure I'm in neutral made the biggest difference for me. DUH! At my weight the bike jumps up and rocks a bit before it settles. I'm working on getting her up on there smoothly. It's a bit disconcerting when you go to straighten that beast while standing to one side. I wish I could get mine to go up slower. Looks like I'm launching mine.

Gain weight? Not the best option. There shouldn't be much back use in the process at all. You can't lift it without the lever on the stand. And if you;re standing with all your weight on the lever, you can't really "lift" at all can you? My thought is that you're trying to lift as your weight leaves the ground as the bike goes up, therefore your lifting effort is going where?

Keep trying. Once you find the "way", you;ll be okay.

Rando
rando is offline  
post #16 of 20 Old Oct 15th, 2006, 4:51 pm
Senior Member
 
wipatters's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Posts: 140
Two thoughts on this

I'm working on this center stand thing myself with my '02. I actually became so weary a few weeks ago trying to get it up on the stand in my garage that she decided to lay down on her right side. At least it was in the garage so the entire world didn't witness it. :-) No damage to LT or driver.

Anyway, here is my theory for my difficulties. My garage floor is very smooth concrete. When wet, it is like ice if not more slippery than ice - if that's possible. I figured out that the stand was not getting a grip on the concrete and was just sliding instead of grabbing and springing up. So I put a heavy rubber door mat under the mid section of the LT and she went up in two tries! I recommend checking out the surface that you're trying to bring her up on.

Secondly, here is a suggestion I haven't seen on this forum. My brother-in-law suggested bringing the LT up on the center stand from the right side instead of the side stand side. The theory is that if she falls to her right side, you can push back. If she falls to her left (side stand side), if you put the side stand down first, she should be controllable to stop at the side stand. Does that sound like a viable alternative?

Bill

'02 K1200LTC Pacific Blue

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



Yeah, I know, I need to get out more!
wipatters is offline  
post #17 of 20 Old Oct 15th, 2006, 6:36 pm
Super Moderator
 
dfinazzo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Waconia, MN, USA
Posts: 1,358
Cool Go leg go . .

This is my story and I am sticking to it:

Wear boots with stiff soles, once the stand is "properly" in contact with terra firma just put leg strength into the stand - all leg push - even stand on the kick stand if you need to. You may need to add some back / arm strength but it is minor. When the bike is about to rock over center and slide back moderate your force at the last moment so you do send it flying.

Possible reasons for extra effort:

1. Lube your stand pivot points you will be surprised
2. As others have said make sure your rear shock preload is down
3. Very low tire pressure
4. Bike is loaded with with weight
5. Your actions need to be coordinated
6. Your weight is under 150#

I think someone needs to shoot a video of doing this properly since this is a very popular activity . . .

Good luck . . .

Dan Finazzo
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


"Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted to get"
dfinazzo is offline  
post #18 of 20 Old Oct 15th, 2006, 8:14 pm
Senior Member
 
Steve_R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Snellville, GA, USA
Posts: 6,424
There is a trick to getting the beast up on the centerstand. If the bike tipped to the right, then it was too far to the right when you were trying to put it on the centerstand.

Here's what I do everytime I put it up on the centerstand.

1. Leave the bike in gear and front wheel straigt
2. Ease the bike up from the side stand and deploy the centerstand with the right foot
3. Feel the left side of the centerstand touch down
4. Keep moving the bike until you feel the right side touch down
5. If you can balance the bike with only your left hand on the handle bar, then you're centered
6. Place you right hand on either the lift handle or pannier handle
7. Pull in the clutch
8. Step step down hard with your right foot - at this point my body weight will bring the bike up
9. If needed pull straight up with your right arm while pushing down with you leg

I learned this technique from John Rehder and never had it fail. I've even done it with tennis shoes on and I heard that some one has one it barefooted. John's smaller than I am and he pops his up that way too.

On His Ride,
Steve
-
KA5MTE
'02 LTE - Red-blooded Dragonfly
'00 Unigo - Dragon's Egg
'01 LTC - Flying Purple People Eater (Ya gotta be old enough to understand)(RIP)
'00 LTC - Canyon Red Rover (RIP)

Have you
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bmwlt.com lately????



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


"To not know me is to lose nothing, to not know Him is to lose everything."
Steve_R is offline  
post #19 of 20 Old Oct 15th, 2006, 10:23 pm
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 207
Center stand

I did it the same as Steve until my right hip got so bad that I switched to using my left foot. I think it works better with the left foot. I try to pull a 'little backwards' on the bag handle. Now with the 'new' hip I can use both but prefur the left foot.
Glenn
little_jake is offline  
post #20 of 20 Old Oct 19th, 2006, 7:55 am
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_R
I learned this technique from John Rehder and never had it fail. I've even done it with tennis shoes on and I heard that some one has one it barefooted. John's smaller than I am and he pops his up that way too.

I have done it barefooted a couple of times when I am can't be bothered going to get my shoes. Puts a fair bit of pressure on the arch of the foot, but if you do it quick it doesn't hurt... too much lol
Ozkruz is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the BMW Luxury Touring Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
2002 k1200ltc center stand retrofit? rogerK K1200LT 14 Nov 25th, 2008 11:07 pm
Hydraulic Center Stand Fails 2x Lynn_Keen K1200LT 46 Feb 16th, 2007 6:37 am
Center Stand--won't engage scout70 K1200LT 9 Apr 17th, 2006 11:20 pm
Center stand. cherokee123 K1200LT 1 Mar 8th, 2006 4:32 am
Deming Cycle Center, NM MajNullo Chit Chat 1 Nov 22nd, 2005 1:57 pm

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome