Slippin' in The Rain - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
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post #1 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 1:21 pm Thread Starter
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Slippin' in The Rain

I purchased a new set of Metz880's 5 weeks and 1200 miles ago. Pressures are set at 42/48 as recommended by many of you here. Dave Shealey and some others have posted that the 880 rear tire can slip out in wet conditions. This happened yesterday, the first time I rode in the rain on the tires, and it left me feeling a lot more unsettled about them than I did just reading about it. The situation was a simple turn to the left, 25 feet out of a stop, where I shifted to second in the turn. As I gave her a little juice, the back tire slid out a few inches and quickly bit pavement again for me to restabilize. I'm aware that the early stages of a rain and the center lane position where grease and oil accumulate is when/where many problems can occur, but this was not the situation.

On dry pavement, the 880's are fantastic. But I question whether I'm taking my life into my hands to ride with these tires on wet roads. I don't consider myself an overly aggressive rider and I don't make a habit of engine braking, even less so in rain. And I'm not adverse to wet weather (I took my skills test for my Class M license in a downpour).

Two questions...
1. What tires do you have and how do they perform for you in wet conditions?
2. We know the LT is a bike that's engineered to chuckle at rain, but we all ride differently. What specific riding tendencies do you have in the rain (avoid it, ignore it, ease up or let 'er rip)

Any other advice or comments from those of you who have 880's - or have had them - is welcome. Thanks a lot...

Bob Darkey
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post #2 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 1:39 pm
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The benefit of the 880's are a good ride and long life, You just found the downside. There is no perfect tire, All have pro's and cons. I live in the northwet and would not even consider having them on my bike because At least 30-40 percent of my riding is in the rain. If I lived in Socal, I might try them because of the high heat, grooved pavement, and infrequent rain.

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post #3 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 2:01 pm
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I went with the avon front, (verdict is still out on it) and bt020 on rear, I love this tire wish the front held up, have to change the front at 6K miles. The reason for avon is it is supposed to last longer. as far as slippage I ride in the south where it can be hot as hell and wet as the sea in a matter of seconds. No problems with slippage.

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post #4 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 2:10 pm
 
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You don't consider yourself an aggressive rider but shifting gears in a turn, in the wet sounds a little aggressive to me.
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post #5 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 2:27 pm
 
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It doesn't make a dang bit of difference "wet or dry"..Bridgestone vs Metzeler vs Avon, THE LT is a Hippo when not riding in a straight line. I don't trust the bike on most curves and turns. I SLOW the bike before entering and exiting curves.
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post #6 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 2:45 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoodoodrum
It doesn't make a dang bit of difference "wet or dry"..Bridgestone vs Metzeler vs Avon, THE LT is a Hippo when not riding in a straight line. I don't trust the bike on most curves and turns. I SLOW the bike before entering and exiting curves.
Not sure I agree with your premise that the LT is Hippo is turns, BUT I do agree with your conclusion; brake early, then accelerate through the curve or corner. Puts the suspension to work and stabilizes the ride. I do this not only for the LT and my other two wheelers, but cars too.

I'm a Metz fan, never had any trouble in fog, mist, rain, mud or snow, including an eight mile piece of hell on the Tok Cut Off.

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post #7 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 2:59 pm
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BT020 for me

I live in Socal and use BT020. Even though we don't get that much rain, the BT020's work better for me on things like tar-snakes and pavement markings that are wet from sprinkles, drainage etc. I had some Metzlers on for about 1K and just lost confidence in them. I just got 10.5 K on my rear BT and expect at least 15K from this set as I now use "Ride-on" and kept 42/48 in them. I've also learned from Bridgestone technical that the radial BT020 will be discontinued at the end of the year. I'm sticking with the factory issued bias belted.

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post #8 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 3:06 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoodoodrum
It doesn't make a dang bit of difference "wet or dry"..Bridgestone vs Metzeler vs Avon, THE LT is a Hippo when not riding in a straight line. I don't trust the bike on most curves and turns. I SLOW the bike before entering and exiting curves.
The fat lady rock and rolls in turns! Let her rip at high RPM on the exit of your apex whilst laid over and laughing and you'll see what I mean.



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post #9 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 3:53 pm
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BT020 Bias

The Bias BT 020's I have on my LT now are working perfectly.

A very agressive ( for me ) ride thru AR, and MO were enough to convince me that these are way, way better than the Metzlers..

Did 250 miles in the rain the first weekend I had them and not a slip.

John

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post #10 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 4:36 pm
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Took my factory installed Metz. 880 tire's off my 06 at 3000 miles.
I had had it with them.
Had the Bridstone Bias tires installed front and rear, and never looked back.
Bike handels like a champ in all conditions.
Oh yes, this Hippo rocks in the twisties, as far as I'm concerned.
Richard

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post #11 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 4:58 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkey
Two questions...
1. What tires do you have and how do they perform for you in wet conditions?
2. We know the LT is a bike that's engineered to chuckle at rain, but we all ride differently. What specific riding tendencies do you have in the rain (avoid it, ignore it, ease up or let 'er rip)

Any other advice or comments from those of you who have 880's - or have had them - is welcome. Thanks a lot...
I use BT020s now and have since the original set of Metzlers that were on my bike came off because I could not get comfortable with the noise. I ride in the rain but not every day and no matter what tire you have it can step out on you in the rain. Too many variables from oil and debris to just too much power applied in a lean..

I have had a slip or two with the Metzlers I had on originally and that will give you some pucker. I didn't fault the Metzler on any of the slips. The main reason I moved to stones was I did not like the noise the Metzlers make and I was uncomfortable leaning into corners with the tires making more noise than the exhaust...

I can say that I have had a slip or two with the stones but I usually can put a good reason to each and every one.. like a paint stripe, arrow, tar snake or crossing a railroad track at a less than optimal angle..

I'll take my chances with the stones. I am not getting that bad mileage on the stones. Probably better than most riders with the 880s.. but it takes a lot of extra work to keep the pressures at optimal pressure for me.. (42/48).

I think you will need to ride aware that your 880s might be a little touchy in a light or new rain and see if you like them when they are 75% used. If not give the stones a try.

JM2CW

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post #12 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 5:30 pm
 
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I am on my 3rd K1200LT and maybe I have just been lucky, but have never noticed any slipping and sliding with the 880's which I have ran on all 3 bikes.
Leon
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post #13 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 5:32 pm
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Had nearly new ME880's on the bike when I bought it (used). Almost lost it on the way home in conditions where it was just spitting rain. I was going around a medium speed turn, and could not completely avoid one of the huge painted arrows on the pavement. Only hit a small portion of the arrow, but almost dumped the bike. Whether moist paint or tar snakes, I needed something which I could have more confidence with. Went to the BS BT020's, and they are noticeably improved in wet performance to me. Also I have no issues with them in the dry.

With an 850#+ bike, I am willing to accept the trade-off in control over mileage/longevity. "Gave away" some nearly new ME880's to accomplish this.

Tom

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post #14 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 5:43 pm
 
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so..

Is there any white wall tires for the k1200lt yet ?
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post #15 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 6:01 pm
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I also think this hippo handles the turns great,
I have ground foot pegs and lower fairing with both the 880's and the BT020's and in ideal conditions both are good tires
But the BT's are much better in the wet and tar snakes than the 880's

Dan
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post #16 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 6:10 pm
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On my 3rd set of 880's - never any problem w/ wet weather or any other handling issues.

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post #17 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 6:26 pm
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The *ONE* variable these 'wet/dry, metzler, B-stone, slider' type threads always seem to leave out - what kinda road??

Asphalt? Grooved? Rutted? Cement? Clean? Dirty? Greasy? What??

Here in Casper we've a wide variety of asphalt and cement. I run Metzlers and have had only ONE minor problem with them. Yea, happened to have been wet - was a worn, highly used cement intersection. Sucker is polished to damn near glass like. Got a bit o wiggle outta the ol gal's ass. Same conditions on asphalt - nothing but totaly 'stickum'.

Same corner - my Ramcharger can get sassy too.

So - you all that've had these Metzler 'issues' - what's the rest of the story? Was it really the tire and wet or is there more here....

Tate

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post #18 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 7:20 pm Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zotter
The *ONE* variable these 'wet/dry, metzler, B-stone, slider' type threads always seem to leave out - what kinda road??

Asphalt? Grooved? Rutted? Cement? Clean? Dirty? Greasy? What??

So - you all that've had these Metzler 'issues' - what's the rest of the story? Was it really the tire and wet or is there more here....
Good point...For me yesterday, however, it was your basic, garden-variety clean asphalt.

Bob Darkey
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post #19 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 7:26 pm Thread Starter
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Hey, thanks to all of you who took time to respond. Sounds consistently like those of you who have had experience with both the 880's and the 020's have been happier with 020's for wet riding. I steered clear of the Stones because of issues I've seen posted regarding bubbling/delamination (if that's what you call it with a tire), but maybe that's a discussion for another thread.

Your advice, as well as those who posted in the thread below entitled "rain riding" has been very beneficial.

Safe riding to all of you...

Bob Darkey
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post #20 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 7:28 pm
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rlv
Took my factory installed Metz. 880 tire's off my 06 at 3000 miles.
I had had it with them.
Had the Bridstone Bias tires installed front and rear, and never looked back.
Bike handels like a champ in all conditions.
Oh yes, this Hippo rocks in the twisties, as far as I'm concerned.
Richard
send those rag metzlers to me. they still have 10k left.
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post #21 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 7:57 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zotter
The *ONE* variable these 'wet/dry, metzler, B-stone, slider' type threads always seem to leave out - what kinda road??

Asphalt? Grooved? Rutted? Cement? Clean? Dirty? Greasy? What??

Here in Casper we've a wide variety of asphalt and cement. I run Metzlers and have had only ONE minor problem with them. Yea, happened to have been wet - was a worn, highly used cement intersection. Sucker is polished to damn near glass like. Got a bit o wiggle outta the ol gal's ass. Same conditions on asphalt - nothing but totaly 'stickum'.

Same corner - my Ramcharger can get sassy too.

So - you all that've had these Metzler 'issues' - what's the rest of the story? Was it really the tire and wet or is there more here....
No, not really.
Rode the slick assed Metzler tires over the same dry wet roads as I now ride the sticky stones over, and in the same city, and state.
Hope that you don't find out the hard way.
After the third time the rear end slid out on me, I just parked the bike because the Metzler 880's just plain unnerved me. Told myself that I was not riding it again until it was the day to take it in to get the new tires put on.
Richard

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post #22 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 8:15 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zotter
Yea, happened to have been wet - was a worn, highly used cement intersection. Sucker is polished to damn near glass like. Got a bit o wiggle outta the ol gal's ass.
I hate it when that happens. Polished glass section of farm to market road, throw in some oil on top of the wet and I went down whilst traversing a straight line. That is, after the bike swapped ends. Even the Bridgestones didn't handle that condition.

And speaking of stepping out, I hates tar snakes in corners.



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post #23 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 8:22 pm
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Not again. Attached pic says it all for me. Notice sponsor at waistline. Used Metz's forever. When it rained, used them as DOT rains instead of Dunlops or Michelins. Pocono, Rockingham, Texas World, etc, all banked, all on Metz's.


I also go PDQ on the LT in the rain. At least that's what the cage drivers behind me say! Tip - smmmmooooth. That mid-turn shift was probably a little sloppy. Clutch engagement or throttle application. Once your near vertical the throttle can be wacked wide open with no problem on the LT, as long as your not on a paint line, tar snake, antifreeze, oil, reflector, etc.

All tires are slippery in the rain, one has to be very smmmmoooooth.

I have to quit reading these tire threads - I get too worked up. We can talk all day about what works and what doesn't, but until we're on the road at the same time at the same place we will probably not learn better techniques from each other.
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post #24 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 9:03 pm
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Thanks, John....a voice of reason in the wilderness. I actually LIKED my 880s 'cause they broke away so smoothly. Used to run them on my Roadstar and spin the rear up like crazy coming out of corners. I actually quit using them because of the howling after 8 or 9K miles ( on the LT...never lasted that long on the Road*!). Drove me crazy like I had hooked a possum on the center stand.

Smoooooooth is the ticket in the rain, and the rest of the time too. Sudden moves spends traction bucks you might not be able to cash. Practice every time you ride the bike, whether it's a trip to the convenience store or an IBA ride. Practice till you realize you're doing it without thinking about it. Practice,practice, practice!

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post #25 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 9:22 pm
 
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Tire Pressures

...perhaps the tire pressures of 42/48 may have an impact in rainy situations. Less tire on the road....

My bet is on pressures for one-up riding no more than 40lbs.
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post #26 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 9:33 pm
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Metz 880s, ride year around, all kinds of weather except snowfall and majjor ice on roads, only had the rear slip out twice, both on black ice.

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post #27 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 9:47 pm Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Safedog
...perhaps the tire pressures of 42/48 may have an impact in rainy situations. Less tire on the road....

My bet is on pressures for one-up riding no more than 40lbs.
Makes sense that lower tire pressures would improve traction on wet roads, but I like them fuller on dry pavement.

Sorry if this sounds like a dumb Q, but would you recommend deflating/inflating based on road conditions? I know we can't be stopping and starting 10 times during a road trip to adjust tire pressure in constantly changing weather conditions, but assuming you're taking off knowing what your getting into for several hours at a time, would it be prudent to raise or lower pressure accordingly?

Bob Darkey
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post #28 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 9:48 pm
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He came with 880s and I keep runnin 'em. Dry, wet, hot, cold, gravel, dirt (12 miles of what used to be US-2 in MT) - does 'em all quite well. Curves and corners? Like on a rail.

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post #29 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 10:06 pm
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grifscoots
The fat lady rock and rolls in turns! Let her rip at high RPM on the exit of your apex whilst laid over and laughing and you'll see what I mean.
Though I always tend to take it fairly easy on the 850# beast, I did push her hard at the Dragon last fall. The bike behind me said it looked like the 4th of July as the centerstand feet scraped the pavement. That was also on a 200 mile old set of 880's.
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post #30 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 10:08 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkey
Sorry if this sounds like a dumb Q, but would you recommend deflating/inflating based on road conditions? I know we can't be stopping and starting 10 times during a road trip to adjust tire pressure in constantly changing weather conditions, but assuming you're taking off knowing what your getting into for several hours at a time, would it be prudent to raise or lower pressure accordingly?
I don't believe it's a dumb question.

The pressure in the tire changes as you ride.. as you heat the tires it heats the air inside and heat makes the air expand. So it's basically impossible to get any useable or stable pressure reading unless you do it at the same (tire) temp ... and of course assuming you have an altitude sensitive gauge to remove that factor. It is best to only adjust your pressure when the tire is cool (68 degrees) and at the same altitude and the adjust for your riding style and wear patterns from there.

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post #31 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 10:09 pm
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Safedog
...perhaps the tire pressures of 42/48 may have an impact in rainy situations. Less tire on the road....

My bet is on pressures for one-up riding no more than 40lbs.
That wider footprint contact patch is likely better insurance though it chews tires faster.
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post #32 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 10:23 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkey
Makes sense that lower tire pressures would improve traction on wet roads, but I like them fuller on dry pavement.

Sorry if this sounds like a dumb Q, but would you recommend deflating/inflating based on road conditions? I know we can't be stopping and starting 10 times during a road trip to adjust tire pressure in constantly changing weather conditions, but assuming you're taking off knowing what your getting into for several hours at a time, would it be prudent to raise or lower pressure accordingly?
That's really a right on question. The primary reason for lower pressures is quicker heat build. The marginally wider contact patch does help. The reason for the desirable heat build is the rubber will be closer to it's ideal operating temperature.

So, would I adjust pressures during warmer months for rain, mornings, etc. - No. I adjust my riding style.

But, when riding in consistant 40 deg F or less temps on city streets, I do drop the pressures to 32/36. I have never put a pyrometer to the tread after a ride or checked the pressure rise, however, there is quicker heat rise than at 42/48 as detected with the palm of my hand. Prior experience with a pyro and pressure gage tells me what I would expect.

Keep in mind - too low of pressures and you can damage the tire or worse yet peal it off the rim.

Hope that helps to answer your question.

John

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post #33 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 10:25 pm
 
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I ran out a set of the 880's after 11,000 miles. I never had a problem and didn't think twice about getting another set. The front could have gone another 1,000 or two, but I didn't want to take it in for tires two times. I always try to be very smooth and trust the bike to hold the road. I don't usually shift in corners in the rain either but the painted lines are slick on any tire I ever used.
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post #34 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 10:37 pm
 
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Talking

Ill take all them metzlers you take off.Send them C.O.D.to me lol
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post #35 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 10:51 pm
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Talking Love My Metz!

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post #36 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 10:55 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkey
I purchased a new set of Metz880's 5 weeks and 1200 miles ago. Pressures are set at 42/48 as recommended by many of you here. Dave Shealey and some others have posted that the 880 rear tire can slip out in wet conditions. This happened yesterday, the first time I rode in the rain on the tires, and it left me feeling a lot more unsettled about them than I did just reading about it. The situation was a simple turn to the left, 25 feet out of a stop, where I shifted to second in the turn. As I gave her a little juice, the back tire slid out a few inches and quickly bit pavement again for me to restabilize. I'm aware that the early stages of a rain and the center lane position where grease and oil accumulate is when/where many problems can occur, but this was not the situation.

On dry pavement, the 880's are fantastic. But I question whether I'm taking my life into my hands to ride with these tires on wet roads. I don't consider myself an overly aggressive rider and I don't make a habit of engine braking, even less so in rain. And I'm not adverse to wet weather (I took my skills test for my Class M license in a downpour).

Two questions...
1. What tires do you have and how do they perform for you in wet conditions?
2. We know the LT is a bike that's engineered to chuckle at rain, but we all ride differently. What specific riding tendencies do you have in the rain (avoid it, ignore it, ease up or let 'er rip)

Any other advice or comments from those of you who have 880's - or have had them - is welcome. Thanks a lot...
shifting during a curve is not a smart thing to do regardless of wet dry or tire type, it can let you loose traction easily then regain it and possibly one day cause a high side or a bad slide out


I let her rip, but I'm in the right gear in curves and turns and very seldom shift during a turn or curve,

I run the me 880's , I had it slip catching up to Jo and Dave Dragon on wet roads one time, but I was WOT trying to catch them in a curve

Tom

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post #37 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 11:06 pm Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bowlesj
Hope that helps to answer your question.
Sure does, John. Thanks. Seems this thread took a smmmoooooth momentum swing toward Metzeler in the last number of posts.

What I've learned here is that regardless whether your riding on 880's or 020's (there's a happy bunch of both of you), common sense, riding style and making adjustments where necessary is critical. For every rider there is a preference and a comfort level. We all eventually gravitate to what works for us both in the products we choose for our bikes and how we handle them, depending on individual skill levels and riding conditions.

I appreciate the great dialogue. This thread got a heck of a lot more response than I expected.

Bob Darkey
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post #38 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 11:11 pm Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmgs
shifting during a curve is not a smart thing to do regardless of wet dry or tire type, it can let you loose traction easily then regain it and possibly one day cause a high side or a bad slide out

I let her rip, but I'm in the right gear in curves and turns and very seldom shift during a turn or curve
Thanks for the advice...


Quote:
Originally Posted by tmgs
I run the me 880's , I had it slip catching up to Jo and Dave Dragon on wet roads one time, but I was WOT trying to catch them in a curve
If I ever ride with Joe and Dave, I'll remember this. Thanks for THIS advice...

Bob Darkey
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post #39 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 11:46 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkey
Makes sense that lower tire pressures would improve traction on wet roads, but I like them fuller on dry pavement.

Sorry if this sounds like a dumb Q, but would you recommend deflating/inflating based on road conditions? I know we can't be stopping and starting 10 times during a road trip to adjust tire pressure in constantly changing weather conditions, but assuming you're taking off knowing what your getting into for several hours at a time, would it be prudent to raise or lower pressure accordingly?
Actually, many people recommend raising pressure when wet, lowering it when dry. A larger surface in contact with the road will hydroplane much easier than a small one. You need the pressure per unit area to be higher to push the tire down through the water film and make contact with the road surface. A larger surface will ride up on the water faster.

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post #40 of 43 Old Jul 31st, 2006, 11:46 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkey
Thanks for the advice...


If I ever ride with Joe and Dave, I'll remember this. Thanks for THIS advice...

no problem, i gave that first advice as it is hard to know from someone posting thier riding experience and generally accepted is not to shift during a turn or curve, there will be a test later <big grin> seriously though, if you are not used to this machine and it's various rpm's vs power curve you may end up in trouble some time. heck you can end up in trouble on any Bike shifting up or down in a curve particularly wet orads mixed with oil sand ect ect

have fun ride safe and enoy the LT!

the second advice is not to try to sneak up on two good riders in the rain headed up to the CHerohala Skyway <grin>
Tom

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post #41 of 43 Old Aug 1st, 2006, 12:15 am Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by tmgs
no problem, i gave that first advice as it is hard to know from someone posting thier riding experience and generally accepted is not to shift during a turn or curve, there will be a test later <big grin> seriously though, if you are not used to this machine and it's various rpm's vs power curve you may end up in trouble some time. heck you can end up in trouble on any Bike shifting up or down in a curve particularly wet orads mixed with oil sand ect ect

have fun ride safe and enoy the LT!
No offense here. It's great advice for a new LTer and I'll keep it in mind for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tmgs
the second advice is not to try to sneak up on two good riders in the rain headed up to the CHerohala Skyway <grin>
Tom
On my first trip on the Cherohala (which I hope to shoot over to in Sept. after a visit to Charolotte, NC) my guess is that there'll be no danger of me sneaking up on anyone! Like Bill Murray in What About Bob?, for me it'll be...Baby steps...up the mountain...baby steps...around the curves...baby steps...down the mountain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dshealey
Actually, many people recommend raising pressure when wet, lowering it when dry. A larger surface in contact with the road will hydroplane much easier than a small one. You need the pressure per unit area to be higher to push the tire down through the water film and make contact with the road surface. A larger surface will ride up on the water faster.
Thanks, David. Wouldn't the design of the 880 effectively push water to the outside through the channels that open to the outer edge of the tire, even if you've got more tire on the road (i.e. lower pressure)? Just trying to figure this damned thing out here...

Bob Darkey
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post #42 of 43 Old Aug 1st, 2006, 2:42 am
 
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I couldn't care less about the mileage, compared to safety, and I have settled on the 880s. Have read about too many failures at low miles on the radial types. As far as the Cherohala goes, it is just nice long sweepers, and a good road. Nothing to fret over.
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post #43 of 43 Old Aug 1st, 2006, 8:39 am
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Originally Posted by darkey
No offense here. It's great advice for a new LTer and I'll keep it in mind for sure.
Thanks, David. Wouldn't the design of the 880 effectively push water to the outside through the channels that open to the outer edge of the tire, even if you've got more tire on the road (i.e. lower pressure)? Just trying to figure this damned thing out here...

ahhh but but but, tire pressure is critical to tire design compounds, running a tire low on pressure particularly with todays silica blended tires, can raise the tire temp too much making the tire have less traction than what it is designed for, a soft tire flexes as well which you do not want happening on wet roads (dry ones either when riding hard)

think of this running your tire low, it will let the center go in the oppisite direction of what it is designed to do, therefore possibly catching more water under it!

this pic is exagerated because it is the only one I could fiund and for cars but same basics

see how the underinflated tire rests on the road, many think because our MC tires are rounded (for turning) that this does not happen, well it does although not to that extent, but lets it flex much more as well.

and it really doesn't matter what brand tire your running proper inflation is important to safety cold wet or dry riding. this LT is heavy 800+ lbs + rider/riders gear your alway's pushing 1000lbs or more, run the max psi on the sidewall of your tire for a few hundred miles (Particularly on the ME 880) and you will see the difference in the handling of the bike,

Tom

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