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post #1 of 17 Old Jun 25th, 2006, 10:48 am Thread Starter
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Smile Newbie Maintenance

I have had my 03 LT for less than a month. and it had approx. 10,500 miles when purchased. I have put over 2000 miles on it in that time and have scheduled the 12,000 mile service. The bike runs great. Looks like the bill will be at least $700 at least and probably more from what I have heard. My question is just how important is everything that is done in this service and is it really necessary. Oh I know that if I really wanted to I could do a lot of the service myself if I really wanted to learn it. I really have No desire to or the time. My cars have a lot more miles and require a lot less service. I can see changing the oil and making sure brake pads and tires are good but come on valve adjustments every 6000 miles seems a bit rediculous or replacing the brake fliud seems like a bit much also. In a few thousand I will be replacing tires also. Beginning to think I may have made a mistake in purchasing a Beemer. I know some will say that this is the price you pay for no breakdowns etc. I am sorry but I am not sure I buy that. Like I said my vehicles run with virtually no problems and they are not in the shop every 6000 miles for some dealer service except oil changes. I guess I am looking for some honest feedback in just how critical the 12000 mile service is etc. Thanks for your feedback in advance.
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post #2 of 17 Old Jun 25th, 2006, 10:54 am
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If you would fill in your profile you may be in an area where others are getting together for a tech session. The 12000 miler is a critical service and you should not neglect the service of this bike. After paying for dealer service a time or two, you will be more incline to want to do the service yourself. I still let the dealer do my brake system flush. However, at some time, I will take the time to learn this maintenance myself. Go luck.

John
Hamden, CT
'04 K1200 LTC
"BLACK BUELAH" (She's a beauty)
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post #3 of 17 Old Jun 25th, 2006, 11:49 am
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Exclamation Not so!

You do not need a valve adjustment every 6000 miles!!!
Not sure who told you that, but it's bull...
The valves need to be checked about every 12000 miles, and more often than not there won't be a need for adjustment.
When comes the time to replace the brake fluid you probably want the dealer to do it because of the complexity of the linked brakes and the need to put the bike on the computer. You can however replace the clutch fluid yourself.
In time you will want to learn to replace the fuel and air filter, both of which involve removing the gas tank.
The rest of the time... just ride it like you are on the 6:00 o'clock news!

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post #4 of 17 Old Jun 25th, 2006, 12:07 pm
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Well, the valves can't be adjusted. They get measured. If they are out of spec, then "worn" parts, "buckets", are replaced.

Brake fluid change is CRITICAL.

Fuel filter replacement, every had a vehicle die because of a clogged filter? We can't just pop the hood, once it is towed to a service station, and replace the fuel filter.

The rear end is completely exposed. Literally, remove the fill plug, remove the drain plug, re-install the drain plug, add oil, re-install the fill plug.

Plus, everything does not have to be done at once.

For me, it is easier to do the work in stages instead of bringing it to a dealer.

Bob, 00LT
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post #5 of 17 Old Jun 25th, 2006, 3:14 pm Thread Starter
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Thanks

Thanks for the replies to my question. Guess I will have to get use to doing some maintenance myself or just get use to paying for it. In any event I love the bike and have been quite impresssed with the dealership that I bought it from.
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post #6 of 17 Old Jun 25th, 2006, 6:52 pm
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JDW.. yup.. glad to hear you are going to take care of the bike... that way it will take care of you.

M/C don't wear out in a weekend. By spending time "learning" about your machine, you will come to appreciate it in more ways than we can describe here. You will have a relationship with the machine you can't understand or explain.

If you can find it, read "Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance". It may give you a different perspective.

Find some folks in your area who do their own work.. it's going to save you enough for for a couple of bike trips. You can bring the pics to the dealer and post them..

...............
J.M.J...
Dcn Channing

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post #7 of 17 Old Aug 26th, 2006, 6:50 am
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BecketMa, you are mistaken. When a "valve job" is preformed the valve clearance is measured with a feeler gauge. IF the gap is out of spec, the bucket is measured to determine the appropriate thickness of the new shim (not to determine if the bucket is wore out) which is placed on the back side of the bucket. Hydraulic lifters typically perform this duty in most engines.
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post #8 of 17 Old Aug 26th, 2006, 6:58 am
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gandelf
BecketMa, you are mistaken. When a "valve job" is preformed the valve clearance is measured with a feeler gauge. IF the gap is out of spec, the bucket is measured to determine the appropriate thickness of the new shim (not to determine if the bucket is wore out) which is placed on the back side of the bucket. Hydraulic lifters typically perform this duty in most engines.
Oh, this just might be a good one.
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post #9 of 17 Old Aug 26th, 2006, 7:14 am
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Hit the tech sessions

I have yet to do it because of scheduling conflicts but from what I see on the board if you have a tech session near you do it !!!. they look like a great way to "learn how to fish" and also meet some nice folks.

I have done a lot of the work my self and will continue to do so.
I stager the work over a few weeks and do each bit when I have time.

What has helped me do this is this board and the Cylmer service manual. Get yourself one it will help out a great deal.

Keep the bike and get a bit dirty and you will not be disappointed.
Just my $.02

Rich Kirker
2002 LTC Pacific Blue
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post #10 of 17 Old Aug 26th, 2006, 10:30 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by messenger13
Oh, this just might be a good one.
Oh come on Joe, you could at least have contributed something meaningful to the discussion rather than sitting back and watching with your popcorn! One important item is that there is no "shim under the bucket" as mentioned in the one post. The "bucket" serves as a shim itself. And if you look inside any bucket you will see the thickness stamped there in mm.

Your turn to comment now Joe, or David, or Mark by explaining why it is that the clearance actually decreases due to wear, rather than increasing!

John

John & Marilyn Fisher
'00 K1200LTC "Katie"
'95 Triumph "Tigger"
'12 Triumph 800XC "Tigger II" (RIP)
'12 Triumph 1200 Explorer "Shadow Tigger"
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post #11 of 17 Old Aug 26th, 2006, 4:02 pm
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You do not need valve adjustments every 12K (not 6K as you said), only valve CHECKS. If they are out, they will need adjustment, but that happens only once in a while, certainly not at every 12K service interval. The check is not so expensive, only the actual adjustments can run up due to the far more labor involved.

Brake fluid should be changed every 2 years on ANY vehicle, car or motorcycle. Brake fluid adsorbs moisture from the air no matter what vehicle it is on. If your brake fluid is brown looking in any vehicle it should be purged and changed. adsorbed moisture causes corrosion in the master and slave cylinders.

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post #12 of 17 Old Aug 26th, 2006, 4:08 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gandelf
BecketMa, you are mistaken. When a "valve job" is preformed the valve clearance is measured with a feeler gauge. IF the gap is out of spec, the bucket is measured to determine the appropriate thickness of the new shim (not to determine if the bucket is wore out) which is placed on the back side of the bucket. Hydraulic lifters typically perform this duty in most engines.
There are no shims in the LT engine. There are different sized lifters (buckets), and you do not need to measure them, they are marked inside with their thickness. You measure the valve clearance, and if it is 0.002" or more too large, you change the buckets, which are marked in 0.05MM increments, each 0.05MM is 0.002".

Example: If you need 0.002" more clearance, and the bucket you take out is marked 2.85MM, you would obtain a 2.80MM replacement. Around $13 each if I remember correctly.

I don't want to achieve immortality through my work...I want to achieve it through not dying.

David Shealey
Dandridge, TN
EX: '01 Black LT, BAT BYKE (Totaled at 110,000 miles)
IBA SS, BB, BBG, 10/10ths.
No bike now, but maybe in the future.
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post #13 of 17 Old Aug 26th, 2006, 4:12 pm
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gandelf
BecketMa, you are mistaken. [snip] IF the gap is out of spec, the bucket is measured to determine the appropriate thickness of the new shim (not to determine if the bucket is wore out) which is placed on the back side of the bucket.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dshealey
There are no shims in the LT engine. There are different sized lifters (buckets), and you do not need to measure them, they are marked inside with their thickness. You measure the valve clearance, and if it is 0.002" or more too large, you change the buckets, which are marked in 0.05MM increments, each 0.05MM is 0.002".
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post #14 of 17 Old Aug 26th, 2006, 4:19 pm
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I don't find the maintenance issues much different from the other bikes I've owned. Granted, it takes a bit more effort to get to the bits and pieces. I generally try to adhere to maintenance schedules as rule, especially bikes. It also gives me an opportunity to learn about what I'm riding, and discover potential problems,(like the two vacuum hoses that were off a few weeks ago when I did the throttle upgrade)!
Generally bikes require more maintenance than cars, for example the results of a worn tire certainly carries more danger on a bike than a car. As a matter of fact, most failures or degradation on a bike can create dire results. Plus, new tires feel so good!
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post #15 of 17 Old Aug 28th, 2006, 5:03 pm Thread Starter
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not as bad as I thought

Well after all my whining about maintenance I ended up having both the 12k and yearly maintenance performed by the dealer at the same time. I also had tires replaced. I am very glad that I did. Its nice being out there on the open road knowing that everything on the bike is to spec. By the way I can"t say enough good things about the dealership. Outstanding people and service.
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post #16 of 17 Old Aug 28th, 2006, 5:28 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDW
Well after all my whining about maintenance I ended up having both the 12k and yearly maintenance performed by the dealer at the same time. I also had tires replaced. I am very glad that I did. Its nice being out there on the open road knowing that everything on the bike is to spec. By the way I can"t say enough good things about the dealership. Outstanding people and service.
Hey, J.D. - give your dealership a nice plug and tell the folks here who and where they are. Never know when someone on the list might be in the area and in need of some 'off-the-travelin'-road' service. And I'm glad you got the service done that you expected; you're right about having confidence that you're riding a well-serviced scoot - makes the trip lots more pleasant without worries.

Take care; ride safe.
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post #17 of 17 Old Aug 28th, 2006, 9:57 pm Thread Starter
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Dick, I would be glad to. Twin City BMW in Savoy IL. Great folks.
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