Clutch in or out on a swerve?? - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 8:46 am Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
motorman587's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: , FL, USA
Posts: 2,910
Clutch in or out on a swerve??

At 40 mph, you have two lane choices. Left or right. As you swerve, do you pull in the clutch and coast around the obstacle, or do you keep the throttle steady, maybe roll on a little as you go around. Coasting wouldn't make sense to me.

John
Florida
2004 BMW R1150R Black
Contact me 4 motor training 1&1
Expert witness in motorcycle crash reconstruction (Contact me)
motorman587 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 10:12 am
Lifetime Supporter
 
PadG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Solon, OH, USA
Posts: 4,833
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Personally, I wouldn't touch the clutch at that speed! Well, what I meant is that I wouldn't hold it in. If in doubt, I would have changed down a cog and keep the rpm up, so that the throttle can be used to accelerate OR decelerate quickly. OTOH, I would have both brake & clutch levers "covered" for quick reaction, but again depending on the situation that I was faced with.

Pad. Gajajiva
Solon, OH, USA

2015 R1200RT (San Marino Blue Met.)
2014 R1200RT (Quartz Metallic Blue - Returned to BMW)
2007 R1200RT (Sold!)


Once Upon a Time........
1963 Norton Dominator 650 SS
1960 Triumph Bonneville (T120)
1960 Triumph Thunderbird (6T)
1952 Triumph Thunderbird (6T)
1932 Triumph 500
1952 BSA Goldstar
PadG is offline  
post #3 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 10:43 am
Senior Member
 
Lynn_Keen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: North East Florida, FL, USA
Posts: 2,252
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman587
At 40 mph, you have two lane choices. Left or right. As you swerve, do you pull in the clutch and coast around the obstacle, or do you keep the throttle steady, maybe roll on a little as you go around. Coasting wouldn't make sense to me.
Why is a motorcycle training expert asking this question? Is it a test for the rest of us? In any event I'll bite.

Don't touch the clutch, hold steady throttle, look through to the intended exit and "PRESS/PRESS". Any abrupt change in power delivery to the rear wheel during such a maneuver can significantly alter the intended result.

Lynn Keen
North East Florida
MSF #28271 Retired
'99 Canyon Red RETIRED AT 93,000 MI
'05 GRAPHITE METALLIC retired at 87,000 MI
'01 R1150 GS- totaled
'02 R1150 GS sold
'85 K100/EML sidecar sold
'11 R1200RT currently being enjoyed

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Lynn_Keen is offline  
 
post #4 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 11:23 am
Lifetime Supporter
 
petevandyke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Dallas, TX, USA
Posts: 1,741
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Pull in the clutch and you'll upset the chassis--not something you want to do when you're going to follow up with evasive turning.

Braking? Pull in the clutch.

Weave-weave, controlled roll-off of the throttle or steady speed.

========================================
When life throws you a curve, LEAN INTO IT!!!
2000 R1100RT-P...R.I.P. "Old motorcycle"
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

2004 K1200LT "Lick and Tickle"
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


FU*K Cancer. If I have one more MRI, I'll stick to the refrigerator door.
petevandyke is offline  
post #5 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 12:21 pm
Lifetime Supporter
 
BennyBob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Round Rock, TX, USA
Posts: 2,017
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

I'm with Lynn. When following the MSF guidance on avoidance, the PRESS/PRESS has to be as relaxed as possible. Given that we all tend to tense up in those situations, trying to pull in the clutch adds tension to the arms and adds another change to the environment. Pick your line, PRESS/PRESS, and then do any acceleration or deceleration needed. JM2CW.

Please let us know if we passed the test.

Benny C. (Central Texas)
2001 LTC Pacific Blue (Babe...the blue ox)
1986 Kawasaki Concours (Connie) sold
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
BennyBob is offline  
post #6 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 12:25 pm
Senior Member
 
gerhard's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Exeter, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,527
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

On Saturday I had a lady pulled out of a side street right in front of me on a two lane road, I did not have enough time to check my mirrors and stop safely so I gave it enough throttle to take advantage of the gap in the opposing lane to swing by her. In another situation the reaction may have been different but there just wasn't enough time for a lot of thinking.

Gerhard
gerhard is offline  
post #7 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 2:47 pm
Senior Member
 
bigbear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Winnebago, IL, USA
Posts: 1,178
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Add another name to list supporting Lynn's method.

Squeezing the clutch would be better than rolling off the throttle or braking during the swerve since it would allow all of the available traction to be used for turning during the swerve.

Roy Gregersen

Ride Slow, Ride Fast, Always Ride Safe
85 K100RT sold
02 LTC DOA 9/21/14
12 R1200RT
bigbear is offline  
post #8 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 3:47 pm Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
motorman587's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: , FL, USA
Posts: 2,910
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn_Keen
Why is a motorcycle training expert asking this question? Is it a test for the rest of us? In any event I'll bite.

Don't touch the clutch, hold steady throttle, look through to the intended exit and "PRESS/PRESS". Any abrupt change in power delivery to the rear wheel during such a maneuver can significantly alter the intended result.
Thank you Sir, the reason I ask, and I am a person that leaves the clutch (engaged) out on a swerve. This came on a blog on FB on BMW ON site. Then I remember going to the BMW Performance Center and they taught it there, pulling in the clutch (disengage) during the swerve, which I felt very uncomfortable, and uncontrollable. So I was just popping the question out there.

John
Florida
2004 BMW R1150R Black
Contact me 4 motor training 1&1
Expert witness in motorcycle crash reconstruction (Contact me)
motorman587 is offline  
post #9 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 7:43 pm
Wrencher Extraordinaire
 
jzeiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hazel Green, AL, USA
Posts: 13,482
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

I guess if you were a beginner and that was what you were taught then you would grow accustomed to it. Me, I prefer to remain with engine control of the bike. It just feels right!

John
2009 K1300GT Red Rocket
2009 R1200GS (Gone)
2005 K1200LT Ocean Blue Blue Wizard 110 K and counting...
2006 Bushtec Turbo+2 Spell
2004 330 Ci Convertable
K4AN

Have ridden a Motorcycle in all 48
But lack DE, MA, RI and CT with the 2005 LT

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
jzeiler is offline  
post #10 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 9:05 pm
Senior Member
 
Eric_R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Washougal, Washington, USA
Posts: 216
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman587
At 40 mph, you have two lane choices. Left or right. As you swerve, do you pull in the clutch and coast around the obstacle, or do you keep the throttle steady, maybe roll on a little as you go around. Coasting wouldn't make sense to me.

If the obstacle had heard your loud pipes it would not in your way. Your only recourse is to lay the bike down to maximize control.

2002 K1200LTC Ocean Blue
Eric_R is offline  
post #11 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 10:30 pm
Senior Member
 
IIIIKreacherIIII's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: rosemount, MN, USA
Posts: 183
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

what do you mean by press/press


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
IIIIKreacherIIII is offline  
post #12 of 26 Old Jun 18th, 2013, 11:04 pm
Lifetime Supporter
 
hschisler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Rushville, OH, USA
Posts: 7,776
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by IIIIKreacherIIII
what do you mean by press/press
It means press one grip, and then the other. This completes the swerve maneuver. "Press" is the preferred word for "push". I think - you MSF guys correct me if I'm wrong - it describes a more subtle and controlled maneuver than pushing the grips one direction and then the other.

At least, that's how I recall it from the MSF course I took a few years ago.

Howard Schisler
2015 BMW K1600GTL
2009 BMW K1200LT - 60k miles
2012 BMW F650GS (sold)
2005 BMW K1200LT - "Gray Ghost", traded at 120k miles
2005 Honda Shadow 650 (sold)
AMA, IBA, BMW MOA. CCRs: Braselton 2006, Osage Beach 2007, Duluth 2012


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
[/URL]
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
hschisler is offline  
post #13 of 26 Old Jun 19th, 2013, 7:24 am
Senior Member
 
Lynn_Keen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: North East Florida, FL, USA
Posts: 2,252
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by hschisler
It means press one grip, and then the other. This completes the swerve maneuver. "Press" is the preferred word for "push". I think - you MSF guys correct me if I'm wrong - it describes a more subtle and controlled maneuver than pushing the grips one direction and then the other.

At least, that's how I recall it from the MSF course I took a few years ago.
Yep Howard, you got it right. Many years ago MSF changed the terminology for initiating counter steering from PUSH to PRESS. Guess they thought it provided a better mental image of the action.

Lynn Keen
North East Florida
MSF #28271 Retired
'99 Canyon Red RETIRED AT 93,000 MI
'05 GRAPHITE METALLIC retired at 87,000 MI
'01 R1150 GS- totaled
'02 R1150 GS sold
'85 K100/EML sidecar sold
'11 R1200RT currently being enjoyed

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Lynn_Keen is offline  
post #14 of 26 Old Jun 19th, 2013, 7:28 am
Senior Member
 
Lynn_Keen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: North East Florida, FL, USA
Posts: 2,252
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman587
Thank you Sir, the reason I ask, and I am a person that leaves the clutch (engaged) out on a swerve. This came on a blog on FB on BMW ON site. Then I remember going to the BMW Performance Center and they taught it there, pulling in the clutch (disengage) during the swerve, which I felt very uncomfortable, and uncontrollable. So I was just popping the question out there.
I would love to hear their theory explaining the advantage of disengaging the clutch during a swerve.

Lynn Keen
North East Florida
MSF #28271 Retired
'99 Canyon Red RETIRED AT 93,000 MI
'05 GRAPHITE METALLIC retired at 87,000 MI
'01 R1150 GS- totaled
'02 R1150 GS sold
'85 K100/EML sidecar sold
'11 R1200RT currently being enjoyed

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Lynn_Keen is offline  
post #15 of 26 Old Jun 19th, 2013, 10:18 am
Senior Member
 
bigbear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Winnebago, IL, USA
Posts: 1,178
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn_Keen
I would love to hear their theory explaining the advantage of disengaging the clutch during a swerve.
Only reason I could think off is to eliminate the braking effect from a persons tendency to roll off the throttle during an Oh Sh*t moment.

Roy Gregersen

Ride Slow, Ride Fast, Always Ride Safe
85 K100RT sold
02 LTC DOA 9/21/14
12 R1200RT
bigbear is offline  
post #16 of 26 Old Jun 19th, 2013, 11:58 am
Wrencher Extraordinaire
 
jzeiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hazel Green, AL, USA
Posts: 13,482
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Also could be the tendency to grip the grips in a panic situation and possible roll on/off throttle to upset the bike. That is why we practice, practise, practise, correct?

John
2009 K1300GT Red Rocket
2009 R1200GS (Gone)
2005 K1200LT Ocean Blue Blue Wizard 110 K and counting...
2006 Bushtec Turbo+2 Spell
2004 330 Ci Convertable
K4AN

Have ridden a Motorcycle in all 48
But lack DE, MA, RI and CT with the 2005 LT

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
jzeiler is offline  
post #17 of 26 Old Jun 19th, 2013, 11:56 pm
Senior Member
 
lkchris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA
Posts: 1,012
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by BennyBob
trying to pull in the clutch ... adds another change to the environment.
Make that two, as you'll have to throttle down to avoid overrevving.

Priority #1 is the swerve and changing power application has little effect save for maybe when under strong acceleration, i.e. big power.

Just for fun sometime when just entering a curve at 'interesting" speed see what it's like to simultaneously declutch/dethrottle. I bet you'll think it pretty distracting. Priority #1 is the curve. And, I don't think I'll try this experiment. For certain not a right curve. Full disclosure: I'm still a slow in/power out guy from my Airhead days.

Kent Christensen
Albuquerque
'12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S
lkchris is offline  
post #18 of 26 Old Jun 20th, 2013, 9:03 am Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
motorman587's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: , FL, USA
Posts: 2,910
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

[QUOTE=Lynn_Keen]I would love to hear their theory explaining the advantage of disengaging the clutch during a swerve.[/QUOTE=
This what Blair Young wrote, he is which I found on a google search was a BMW Performance Center motorcycle instructor. Below is why he explained to disengage the clutch.

"Given the two scenarios.... clutch in or clutch out during a high-speed swerve...and looking at the pros and cons of each scenario...it's safer to pull the clutch in.

A swerve uses tremendous amounts of traction, taking power away from the rear wheel prevents an inadvertent twist of the throttle (less experienced riders sometimes twist the throttle while pushing on the bars)

Also, assuming the inadvertent power delivery during the swerve doesn't cause the rear tire to go beyond its traction limit, adding power tends to stand the bike up. This is not what you want happen when you're trying to change your path of travel quickly.

Others may disagree and I'm okay with that. In the end, a successful swerve isn't whether you pull your clutch in or not, it's whether you avoided the obstacle that's forced you to swerve."

John
Florida
2004 BMW R1150R Black
Contact me 4 motor training 1&1
Expert witness in motorcycle crash reconstruction (Contact me)
motorman587 is offline  
post #19 of 26 Old Jun 20th, 2013, 2:41 pm
Senior Member
 
Lynn_Keen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: North East Florida, FL, USA
Posts: 2,252
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

[QUOTE=motorman587]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn_Keen
I would love to hear their theory explaining the advantage of disengaging the clutch during a swerve.[/QUOTE=
This what Blair Young wrote, he is which I found on a google search was a BMW Performance Center motorcycle instructor. Below is why he explained to disengage the clutch.

"Given the two scenarios.... clutch in or clutch out during a high-speed swerve...and looking at the pros and cons of each scenario...it's safer to pull the clutch in.

A swerve uses tremendous amounts of traction, taking power away from the rear wheel prevents an inadvertent twist of the throttle (less experienced riders sometimes twist the throttle while pushing on the bars)

Also, assuming the inadvertent power delivery during the swerve doesn't cause the rear tire to go beyond its traction limit, adding power tends to stand the bike up. This is not what you want happen when you're trying to change your path of travel quickly.

Others may disagree and I'm okay with that. In the end, a successful swerve isn't whether you pull your clutch in or not, it's whether you avoided the obstacle that's forced you to swerve."
Thanks for researching this John. After reading the above I think I'll stick with my original opinion; leave clutch engaged and hold steady throttle. Having worked with a couple thousand students over a 13 year period of teaching the MSF Basic and ERC classes I can say that I never had a student crash while running a swerving exercise. Saw lots of crashes in other exercises but never swerving. Wonder what you would tell folks riding a Bergman, Silver Wing or the new BMW or any other scooter to do while your teaching the students with clutches?

Lynn Keen
North East Florida
MSF #28271 Retired
'99 Canyon Red RETIRED AT 93,000 MI
'05 GRAPHITE METALLIC retired at 87,000 MI
'01 R1150 GS- totaled
'02 R1150 GS sold
'85 K100/EML sidecar sold
'11 R1200RT currently being enjoyed

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Lynn_Keen is offline  
post #20 of 26 Old Jun 20th, 2013, 3:33 pm
Senior Member
 
mwnahas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Bedford Hts, OH, USA
Posts: 4,234
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Steady on. Any change is speed effects the swerve. Deceleration will make it harder.

Just Go
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Mike
Cleveland Ohio
2019 K1600b Grand America, Blue Max.
mwnahas is offline  
post #21 of 26 Old Jun 20th, 2013, 5:27 pm
Senior Member
 
ka5ysy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Prairieville, Louisiana, USA
Posts: 1,277
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Same question, same answer from the MOA site:

OK... Instructor hat on.

We MSF Ridercoaches teach the swerve as two quick countersteer operations, with your torso upright. Let the bike roll around under you and do not try to lean with the bike as it will slow the roll rate. Separate the braking, if any, from the swerving simply because if you do the two quick countersteer maneuvers correctly you will be using essentially all the available traction getting the bike around the problem. If you attempt braking you will almost guarantee a low-side crash when a wheel locks up.

If you attempt to pull in the clutch lever when doing this, you will destabilize the suspension of the motorcycle and probably end up hitting the object your are trying to avoid.

A better survival plan is to keep enough space - the "space cushion" (a reactionary gap ) between yourself and anything in front of you so you do not have to execute a swerve as an emergency maneuver. No tailgating ever !, and keep your head on a swivel to avoid problems in the first place.

While we are on the topic of swerving, how many of you actually practice that regularly ? It is one of three emergency maneuvers that are volatile skills that you will lose if not practiced.

The other two are emergency stops straight ahead, and emergency stops in curves, both left and right.

How many of you with ABS brakes actually know what they do on your bike ? Go out and do a few quick stops and see how the ABS reacts. You really need to know the capabilities.

Please consider taking a MSF course as a refresher, Basic Ridercourse, Basic Ridercourse 2, or the new Advanced Rider Course. You will have a fun time doing the exercises, and might learn something. I have had many riders take refresher courses over the years and they all say they either learned something new, or corrected bad habits they had gotten into over time.

The absolutely best feedback we receive is when former students come to visit us at class or see us on the road and tell us that something they learned in class saved a bad crash. That makes it worth all the blazing hot days we stand out on the range dodging motorcycles. That is priceless.

Ride safe out there and remember: You are invisible and everyone is out to kill you. Act accordingly.

Doug Stracener
2011 RT polar metallic
Attorney,
MSF #127350,
Instructor, Motorcycle Safety Program Louisiana Department of Public Safety
NAUI Scuba Instructor #36288
Divers Alert Network Board member
ka5ysy is offline  
post #22 of 26 Old Jun 20th, 2013, 7:02 pm
Wrencher Extraordinaire
 
jzeiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hazel Green, AL, USA
Posts: 13,482
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by ka5ysy
How many of you with ABS brakes actually know what they do on your bike ? Go out and do a few quick stops and see how the ABS reacts. You really need to know the capabilities.
Ditto on all you said and for those that ride two up, do it solo then, when you are comfortable, do it again two up so your pillion will know what to expect. Both braking and swerving.

John
2009 K1300GT Red Rocket
2009 R1200GS (Gone)
2005 K1200LT Ocean Blue Blue Wizard 110 K and counting...
2006 Bushtec Turbo+2 Spell
2004 330 Ci Convertable
K4AN

Have ridden a Motorcycle in all 48
But lack DE, MA, RI and CT with the 2005 LT

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
jzeiler is offline  
post #23 of 26 Old Jun 20th, 2013, 10:23 pm
Senior Member
 
Chipper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Elk Grove, CA, USA
Posts: 492
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Clutch out for me is the way I train and was trained. My clutch is covered with my four fingers 99% of the time...

Bill (aka Chipper)
Elk Grove Ca.
2014 K1600GTL-E
2009 K1200LT (BLACK)-Traded In
2004 RTP Work Bike(Retired)
2002 LTE Totaled Aug/2011)
1978 H-D LowRider
1975 Honda-Goldwing
Chipper is offline  
post #24 of 26 Old Jun 21st, 2013, 10:15 am
Senior Member
 
Razmataz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Pesotum, Il, USA
Posts: 1,334
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Lots of good points here, but I certainly have to agree with what JohnZ said about leaving the clutch alone and controlling the bike with the engine. Your in power then, with the clutch in your basically a sling shot.

BMW 1200 LTC 2002


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Illinois...The Only State Where The Governors Make The License Plates
Razmataz is offline  
post #25 of 26 Old Jun 22nd, 2013, 12:46 am
Senior Member
 
Sleuth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Antwerpen, Belgium
Posts: 453
Garage
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipper
Clutch out for me is the way I train and was trained. My clutch is covered with my four fingers 99% of the time...
(Too) Many moons ago I was in training, and the wisdom there was to cover the clutch and brake levers. This way (or so I think) is if you need to react then you can - immediately. No waiting for hand movement after thinking about what needs to be etc etc.

Here in Belgium, the wisdom has always been to hold the grips, so you do not accidentally activate the brakes / clutch while riding. The only time I ever did that, was on a one day course & the first time I ever sat on a bike!

In terms of this discussion, my (sometimes rather worthless) opinion is that with clutch in - you have no control of the bike's movement only left / right. If you keep the engine coupled to the wheels then you can speed up as well. You have complete control over all the directions the bike can go.

There has been one occasion when I have needed to swerve, and accelerate!

Best regards
Sleuth

Current & previous bikes
2020 R 1200GSA Ice Grey (Not yet received)
2010 R1200RT Thunder Grey (Used in Part Exchange)
1988 K100RT (For Sale)
Suzuki GS850 (Sold)
Sleuth is offline  
post #26 of 26 Old Jun 30th, 2013, 9:18 am
Lifetime Supporter
 
DanDiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tampa, FL, USA
Posts: 4,848
Re: Clutch in or out on a swerve??

Several years ago, I took the "Ride Like a Pro" class on my LT and was one of the few to get through the high speed (I think it was around 30-40MPH) cone maneuver section. It was all body lean and nothing on the brake or clutch. The LT went through like it was nothing...

Slow speed was another story!!

Dano
Tampa, Fl.

12 K1600 GTL
02 K1200 LT (gone but not forgotten)
DanDiver is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the BMW Luxury Touring Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I fought the clutch and the clutch won. Slammer Chit Chat 3 Apr 14th, 2013 11:56 pm
Take off, 'eh? Starting the LT from stop... petevandyke K1200LT 26 May 30th, 2012 9:48 am
Slipping Clutch - Clutch Slave Cylinder lhendrick K1200LT 24 Mar 29th, 2009 7:02 pm
Unreliable clutch advice please cyclecamper K1200LT 11 Dec 1st, 2008 10:23 pm
latest clutch analysis cyclecamper K1200LT 17 Feb 27th, 2007 9:00 pm

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome