Motorcyclist heat stroke death - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 Old Jun 28th, 2009, 9:41 pm Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Tuscola (S. of Abilene), TX, USA
Posts: 141
Motorcyclist heat stroke death

Just a reminder to all about riding in extreme heat. Just got a message from a friend who just attended the funeral of a man who dehydrated while on a motorcycle trip with a group of riders and suffered a heat stroke. I do not know where it took place but know the man lived in Seminole, TX. I have been in Austin and San Antonio (in auto) the last few days with temps up to 107 and thought several times about how tough it would have been on bike.

'02 Silver R1150RT

Lynn
tumbleweed is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old Jun 28th, 2009, 10:04 pm
Senior Member
 
asleeplessknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cape Elizabeth, ME, USA
Posts: 215
Post Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

Read and Heed!

Dehydration and Heat Stroke

The danger of dehydration and heat stroke:

Dehydration and heat stroke are two very common heat-related diseases that can be life-threatening if left untreated.

What is dehydration?

Dehydration can be a serious heat-related disease, as well as being a dangerous side-effect of diarrhea, vomiting and fever. Children and persons over the age of 60 are particularly susceptible to dehydration.

What causes dehydration?

Under normal conditions, we all lose body water daily through sweat, tears, urine and stool. In a healthy person, this water is replaced by drinking fluids and eating foods that contain water. When a person becomes so sick with fever, diarrhea, or vomiting or if an individual is overexposed to the sun, dehydration occurs. This is caused when the body loses water content and essential body salts such as sodium, potassium, calcium bicarbonate and phosphate.

Occasionally, dehydration can be caused by drugs, such as diuretics, which deplete body fluids and electrolytes. Whatever the cause, dehydration should be treated as soon as possible.

What are the symptoms of dehydration?

The following are the most common symptoms of dehydration, although each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:
  • thirst
  • less-frequent urination
  • dry skin
  • fatigue
  • light-headedness
  • dizziness
  • confusion
  • dry mouth and mucous membranes
  • increased heart rate and breathing
In children, additional symptoms may include:
  • dry mouth and tongue
  • no tears when crying
  • no wet diapers for more than 3 hours
  • sunken abdomen, eyes or cheeks
  • high fever
  • listlessness
  • irritability
  • skin that does not flatten when pinched and released
Treatment for dehydration:

If caught early, dehydration can often be treated at home under a physician's guidance. In children, directions for giving food and fluids will differ according to the cause of the dehydration, so it is important to consult your pediatrician.

In cases of mild dehydration, simple rehydration is recommended by drinking fluids. Many sports drinks on the market effectively restore body fluids, electrolytes, and salt balance.

For moderate dehydration, intravenous fluids may be required, although if caught early enough, simple rehydration may be effective. Cases of serious dehydration should be treated as a medical emergency, and hospitalization, along with intravenous fluids, is necessary. Immediate action should be taken.

How can dehydration be prevented?

Take precautionary measures to avoid the harmful effects of dehydration, including:
  • Drink plenty of fluids, especially when working or playing in the sun.
  • Make sure you are taking in more fluid than you are losing.
  • Try to schedule physical outdoor activities for the cooler parts of the day.
  • Drink appropriate sports drinks to help maintain electrolyte balance.
  • For infants and young children, solutions like Pedialyte will help maintain electrolyte balance during illness or heat exposure. Do not try to make fluid and salt solutions at home for children.
What is heat stroke?

Heat stroke is the most severe form of heat illness and is a life-threatening emergency. It is the result of long, extreme exposure to the sun, in which a person does not sweat enough to lower body temperature. The elderly, infants, persons who work outdoors and those on certain types of medications are most susceptible to heat stroke. It is a condition that develops rapidly and requires immediate medical treatment.

What causes heat stroke?

Our bodies produce a tremendous amount of internal heat and we normally cool ourselves by sweating and radiating heat through the skin. However, in certain circumstances, such as extreme heat, high humidity or vigorous activity in the hot sun, this cooling system may begin to fail, allowing heat to build up to dangerous levels.

If a person becomes dehydrated and can not sweat enough to cool their body, their internal temperature may rise to dangerously high levels, causing heat stroke.

What are the symptoms of heat stroke?

The following are the most common symptoms of heat stroke, although each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:
  • headache
  • dizziness
  • disorientation, agitation or confusion
  • sluggishness or fatigue
  • seizure
  • hot, dry skin that is flushed but not sweaty
  • a high body temperature
  • loss of consciousness
  • rapid heart beat
  • hallucinations
How is heat stroke treated?

It is important for the person to be treated immediately as heat stroke can cause permanent damage or death. There are some immediate first aid measures you can take while waiting for help to arrive.
  • Get the person indoors.
  • Remove clothing and gently apply cool water to the skin followed by fanning to stimulate sweating.
  • Apply ice packs to the groin and armpits.
  • Have the person lie down in a cool area with their feet slightly elevated
Intravenous fluids are often necessary to compensate for fluid or electrolyte loss. Bed rest is generally advised and body temperature may fluctuate abnormally for weeks after heat stroke.

How can heat stroke be prevented?

There are precautions that can help protect you against the adverse effects of heat stroke. These include:
  • Drink plenty of fluids during outdoor activities, especially on hot days. Water and sports drinks are the drinks of choice; avoid tea, coffee, soda and alcohol as these can lead to dehydration.
  • Wear lightweight, tightly woven, loose-fitting clothing in light colors.
  • Schedule vigorous activity and sports for cooler times of the day.
  • Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a hat, sunglasses and using an umbrella.
  • Increase time spent outdoors gradually to get your body used to the heat.
  • During outdoor activities, take frequent drink breaks and mist yourself with a spray bottle to avoid becoming overheated.
  • Try to spend as much time indoors as possible on very hot and humid days.
If you live in a hot climate and have a chronic condition, talk to your physician about extra precautions you can take to protect yourself against heat stroke.

Link to Source

Asleepless
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
knight
'03 LTE Titan Silver - Active Duty
'83 VF750F Interceptor White/Red - Retired
'74 MT250 Elsinore Silver - RIP
'72 SL125 Silver - RIP

BMWMOA #143933


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by asleeplessknight; Jun 28th, 2009 at 10:05 pm. Reason: added link
asleeplessknight is offline  
post #3 of 12 Old Jun 28th, 2009, 10:59 pm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Northern Colorado, CO, USA
Posts: 1,202
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

In the last week of June 2008, I rode my LT from Los Angeles to Phoenix on I10. I saw temps on the bike thermometer of 105 to 110 going through Lake Elsinore in the early afternoon. I was enduring steady temps of 116+ around 4:00 pm riding through Palm Springs. I had a Cool Vest on. I was stopping approximately every 45 minutes of sooner if necessary to rehydrate the vest and poor a liter of ice water in me and to soak paper tools in cool water in the fast food place restroom to apply to my face and the back of my neck. I then would sit under the strongest A/C vent until I stopped sweating. Drink more water and then out to the LT and make some more miles. When I got into the west side of Phoenix around 10:30 pm, it was still in the high 90s. After a quick, late supper I turned the a/c in my room up to max and climbed right up on top of it.

I was unable to cool my lower legs and thus because the wind blew my heavy weight jeans against my shins. I have photographs of the first degree burns on my shins just above my boot tops!

The next day, while riding across metro Phoenix to visit my ailing mother who lives on the east side of Mesa, I saw temps of 114. Again, it was stopping frequently to hydrate me and the cool vest. I was never so glad to get to Flagstaff late that day.

Oh, the post script was the day after that, having to get home in Northern Colorado, I was crossing the Continental Divide in the great South Park of Colorado at 9,000 ft msl in temps of 40 degrees! I as forced to stop due to beginning hypothermia. I realized that my pajamas and rain gear was still warm from the exhaust heat under the left side case. So, wearing my jammies under my frogg toggs and my dry cool vest over my torso, I was warm and alert for the rest of the ride home, arriving at 1am. It would have been the epitome of irony to have died of exposure after frying in my own juice just the other day.

Deep Fried and Freeze Dried Karl

Disreputable Rode Hard & Put Up Wet Old Deadbeat Geezer
"We're all here because we're not all there"
--Ken & Gene Hunt
'09 Aprilia Scarabeo 500ie -- QuickSilver II
'02 LTE Silver -- Retired
'02 LTC Mauve -- RIP
2009 Subaru WRX, Stage 1 269 whp, 293 ftlb - INTERCEPTOR
2003 Ford Focus, 220 hp @ wheels 180 ftlb torque @ wheels - Traded
Northern Colorado
kmurphy165 is offline  
 
post #4 of 12 Old Jun 29th, 2009, 7:26 am
Senior Member
 
Palerider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Big Piney, Wyoming, USA
Posts: 1,745
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

Thanx for the first aid note........oddly; a lot of folks still don't take it too seriously..............I have training day today with the summer help (just getting to work).............this is always one of the first topics my wife and I cover.........we work out of doors exclusively this time of year and the 'High Desert' environment can can really have some brutal moments.....................

B-Safe all........................Jim
Palerider is offline  
post #5 of 12 Old Jun 29th, 2009, 8:53 am
Lifetime Supporter
 
cfell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Round Rock, TX, USA
Posts: 7,794
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

A good "rule of thumb"..

- If you aint needing to pee (serious pressure) every hour or so, you are not taking in enough fluids.

Remember, when you are riding, you are going to burn more calories and evaporate more fluids...than when you are sedentary.
cfell is offline  
post #6 of 12 Old Jun 29th, 2009, 1:12 pm
Senior Member
 
hallzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Gold Country, CA, USA
Posts: 2,571
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

We rode through up to 111 degree heat this weekend; I keep the vent wings on the LT CLOSED in this type of weather. This helps eliminate the "convection oven" treatment. My pillion and I each drank more than a gallon of water, and were re-charging the Silver Eagle cooling vest within an hour.

The heat was actually quite bearable (although not what I'd call fun!).

Brian
CCR: 2008, Midway; 2011, Boise; 2012, Duluth; 2014, Chattanooga. MOA: Billings, 2015; SLC, 2017
CCR-R: 2018, Russellville
'13 K1600 GTL-P - "Eva"
Sold but "beloved" ride: K12 LT - "Pepe"
IBA #31242 (SSx2, BB, BBG)
MOA #136148

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
-
hallzee is offline  
post #7 of 12 Old Jun 29th, 2009, 1:46 pm
Lifetime Supporter
 
DanDiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tampa, FL, USA
Posts: 4,846
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

I have found that long rides in Florida, in the summer, are not high on my list of things to do. Whenever possible, I have found that sipping ice water, at least every 15-20 minutes, makes a positive difference. I try to keep a cooler on the back seat with ice, water, fruit and light snacks, sipping cold water as often as possible keeps me alert. I try to snack and skip large meals too.

For me, the first sign I am getting dehydrated (hot day, lots of sun and hot humid air) is fatigue. .

Dano
Tampa, Fl.

12 K1600 GTL
02 K1200 LT (gone but not forgotten)
DanDiver is offline  
post #8 of 12 Old Jun 29th, 2009, 5:48 pm
Senior Member
 
Steve_R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Snellville, GA, USA
Posts: 6,424
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

I've gone to wearing a 70oz CamelBak loaded with ice water. I came home from Florida two weekends ago and drained the thing twice, but was alert and sweating like crazy when I got to the house. But decided the black helmet is the next thing to get replaced.

On His Ride,
Steve
-
KA5MTE
'02 LTE - Red-blooded Dragonfly
'00 Unigo - Dragon's Egg
'01 LTC - Flying Purple People Eater (Ya gotta be old enough to understand)(RIP)
'00 LTC - Canyon Red Rover (RIP)

Have you
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bmwlt.com lately????



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


"To not know me is to lose nothing, to not know Him is to lose everything."
Steve_R is offline  
post #9 of 12 Old Jun 29th, 2009, 6:03 pm
Senior Member
 
OU812's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Buffalo Grove, IL, USA
Posts: 1,215
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

Quote:
Originally Posted by cfell
A good "rule of thumb"..

- If you aint needing to pee (serious pressure) every hour or so, you are not taking in enough fluids.

Remember, when you are riding, you are going to burn more calories and evaporate more fluids...than when you are sedentary.
So that is why when I use my Camelback I have to stop every hour to relieve myself to the chagrin of my riding buddies.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

BMW'S ARE THE WORST BIKE IN THE WORLD, CEPT' WHEN YOU COMPARE THEM TO EVERYTHING ELSE!
OU812 is offline  
post #10 of 12 Old Jun 30th, 2009, 6:04 am
Senior Member
 
wacolt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Waco, TX, USA
Posts: 809
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

Although the information may no be available, what was the motorcyclist wearing during the day before he suffered heat stroke?

ATGATT or muscle shirt and dew rag? Windshield or "in the wind"? Camel back or tank/saddle bag with water carried? Bare skin with wind will evaporate/dehydrate much faster than riding with a windshield and ATGATT.

Avatar credit: Curtis Callaway, 2009
Rider of Stahlross
1999 Basalt Grey LT
2001 Classic Red Ducati 748
wacolt is offline  
post #11 of 12 Old Jun 30th, 2009, 9:01 am
Lifetime Supporter
 
powwow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Bend, OR, United States
Posts: 1,457
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

One other suggestion. The water you take today isn't helping you today...it is re-hydrating you for tomorrow. If you know you will be riding in very hot weather, start the hydrating process a couple of days ahead of time. It makes a huge difference in the body's ability to stay hydrated during extreme heat.

Life happens...you control your reaction.

2017 KTM 350 EXC-F (single track monster)
2018 Honda CRF250L Rally (fun on the fire roads)
2015 R1200 RT (holy cow…what a bike)
2007 K1200 LT (sold)
2005 DR 650 (sold)
2002 Harley Ultra (sold)
1999 Harley Road King (sold)
1996 K1100 LT (sold)
1990 Honda Shadow (sold)
1978-1993 Raising Kids; Paying Mortgages
1975 Honda CB550 (sold but wish I still had)
Homemade Motor Bike (mounted a 3.5 HP Briggs & Stratton on my bicycle at age 12)
powwow is offline  
post #12 of 12 Old Jun 30th, 2009, 10:48 am Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Tuscola (S. of Abilene), TX, USA
Posts: 141
Re: Motorcyclist heat stroke death

Quote:
Originally Posted by wacolt
Although the information may no be available, what was the motorcyclist wearing during the day before he suffered heat stroke?

ATGATT or muscle shirt and dew rag? Windshield or "in the wind"? Camel back or tank/saddle bag with water carried? Bare skin with wind will evaporate/dehydrate much faster than riding with a windshield and ATGATT.

No info at this time. Hope to find out more facts and will pass them along.

'02 Silver R1150RT

Lynn
tumbleweed is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the BMW Luxury Touring Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Heat Troller mtrevelino Rider's Gear & Luggage 8 Dec 21st, 2007 11:47 am
Biker or Motorcyclist UncleRock Bike Talk 27 Jul 11th, 2006 6:49 pm
The story of buying my LT (Really REALLY long...) bmwjason Ride Tales 0 Jan 6th, 2006 11:09 pm

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome