A Twist of the Wrist II - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
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post #1 of 11 Old Jul 17th, 2008, 12:32 pm Thread Starter
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A Twist of the Wrist II

I just got thru reading Keith Codeís, Twist of the Wrist II.



The best tip for the average rider that I found was whatís called The Big Picture. Pick a point on the wall and stare it. Without moving your head, or eyes, stare at another point to the left, then the right. Pick points farther out and practice.



This tip really helps your peripheral vision and is supposed to relieve fatigue from moving your head and eyeís.



Now, before those that should be quilting instead of riding motorcycles get their panties in a wad and accuse me of endangering their wives, children, grandchildren, cats, dogs and various fowl and livestock- the next tips come from the racetrack and this research is to make me a better overall rider. After all, most of the bike improvements come from racing and riding tips seem to follow suit.



I found that when entering curves I was completing the curve with no problem, but didnít seem to have any push left if an emergency situation came up. I posted this question on www.k-bikes.com and was given the following tip:



Weigh the OUTER peg. It forms a triangle with the body that needs to stay purdy much in the center of the bike (donít hang off). This triangle transfers the weight to the counter steering arm. It seems I was leaning off the bike too far and leaving no weight on the counter steering arm.. I developed this bad habit with the LT as I donít like dragging parts. Leaning off of the LT gave me more ground clearance. Not only is dragging counter productive, but it slows you down and it freaked me out. You wouldnít believe how hard it is to change a 6 year old, 108,000 mile habit. Not to mention developing new muscles, mainly in the thigh. This tip intrigued me enough to buy the book.



Throttle control was very important in this book, the constant roll on thru the corner was emphasized many times as was steering only once. Pick your spot to apex, quickly steer into it and be done. Posture was covered and overcoming your Survival Responses was hammered throughout the book.



A bunch of this book applied to the race track, but there was plenty in there for all to improve there riding skills. You never know when nailing a corner harder than you need to might save your life. Maximum braking, suspension and weight transfer was also covered.



Though this book is 15 years old it's still relevant and I heartily recommend this book for anybody wanting to improve their riding skills, or for those that are just curious how racers do it.



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post #2 of 11 Old Jul 17th, 2008, 12:47 pm
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

Here you go:
http://www.amazon.com/Twist-Wrist-Mo...786037-7283934
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post #3 of 11 Old Jul 17th, 2008, 4:52 pm
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

Quote:
Originally Posted by grifscoots
I just got thru reading Keith Codeís, Twist of the Wrist II.
+10 on Twist of the Writst II. I read it years ago when I was learning to ride and got a lot out of it. You've reminded me that it's about time to read it again. I've got a cross country trip coming up, it'll be the perfect thing to read on the way.
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post #4 of 11 Old Jul 17th, 2008, 6:31 pm
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

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Originally Posted by bonafidebob
I've got a cross country trip coming up, it'll be the perfect thing to read on the way.
Isn't that dangerous?

Signed, BARR
(Bikers Against Reading & Riding)

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'03 Anthracite Metallic K12LTC, 66K miles
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BMWLT#143, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032


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post #5 of 11 Old Jul 17th, 2008, 7:38 pm
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

The best tip for the average rider that I found was whatís called The Big Picture. Pick a point on the wall and stare it. Without moving your head, or eyes, stare at another point to the left, then the right. Pick points farther out and practice.

Since I read the book I have been using the procedure, looking straight ahead and missing pot holes and dead animals.

Add me to the list of those that endanger.

I found that when entering curves I was completing the curve with no problem, but didnít seem to have any push left if an emergency situation came up. I posted this question on www.k-bikes.com and was given the following tip:

If by the push you mean to lay the bike over more let me say.
If sitting down you have more strength pulling then pushing ( here is where it gets cute) I found that to go left harder I pull hard with my right hand and of course my left hand goes forward. With the pull I have the control right now, and we know going 88ft/s you don't have a lot of time to lean the bike more.

In a curve I don't look for a apex or down the road for the exit. I just look ahead and watch the curve a distance ahead that keep the bike in the same position on the road.

DON
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post #6 of 11 Old Jul 17th, 2008, 8:41 pm Thread Starter
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

Quote:
Originally Posted by donsobeck
If by the push you mean to lay the bike over more let me say.
If sitting down you have more strength pulling then pushing
DON
Ah yes, the infamous pushme/pullyou! I'm confusing the shit out of myself trying to put it all together, but have found that the twisty back roads I take, if I take them slower than normal and practice the techniques, I don't cross my feeble mind with muscle memory by taking them at speed.



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post #7 of 11 Old Jul 17th, 2008, 9:17 pm
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

I took his two day course in person in CA about 10 years ago. Keith did all the classroom stuff both mornings and then off to the track. Money well spent - but I can't remember a time when I was more exhausted from riding 10 minutes at a time. Intense.

They would not ALLOW us to touch the brakes until the second day. It's all about being smooth and calm at speed. If you crashed you went home without a refund. Many did trying to be super bike studs.

Being a former moto crosser and short tracker I thought I was REALLY fast until one of the instructors passed me on the outside in a corner with one hand on the throttle and the other hand on his hip looking back over his shoulder shaking his head in contempt.

We were both riding identical Kawi 600's...


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post #8 of 11 Old Jul 18th, 2008, 8:13 am
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

I read TOTW II and picked up a few pointers, like many of you. Then I read Nick Ianetsch's Sport Riding Techniques And found much more useful information for street riding. Give it a look also.

Always ride in a comfort zone on the street that gives you enough extra cushion to make an emergency manuever. Even if that means slowing a bit. Currently I am practicing changing up my lines mid turn, to learn how that feels.

I don't think I understand the bit about weighting the outer peg when entering a turn. Seems counterproductive to me. I'll have to give a try to see. And while hanging off looks cool to some, is there really a need to be travelling that fast on the road? All it takes is one mistake on your part or someone else's and there is no margin of error left. I would say if you're leaning off a lot, maybe it's time to look at a track day and a sport bike for that track day. I'm not going to get my panties in a wad over it, just my thoughts. : )

I find that if I lean in a little, like get my chin and jacket zipper inside the centerline of the bike in a turn, that it gives me better cornering clearance, more confidence, and more room to adjust if I need to change my line mid turn. I've been practicing on most every turn and on the MSF ERC range when I get a chance.

Dragging parts is a sign of too much entry speed and/or poor technique in many cases. A light touch every now and again is fine. Eveyone should experience it to find the limits of their bikes. And to see what happens. Most stock bikes have pegs that touch first and fold up, instead of hard-mounted parts that lever tires off the ground. And a light scrape really doesn't upset that bike too much, IF the RIDER doesn't panic and do something weird.

Again, however, if one is constantly scraping, they should study their riding techniques and bike choice.

Discussions like this are what mkes this a great forum, imo.

Randy
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post #9 of 11 Old Jul 18th, 2008, 9:23 am Thread Starter
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

Sadly, the first part of the LT that touches down is the centerstand.... till you get it good and ground down. I have levered the rear wheel on the LT changing directions quickly. I didn't go down, but I cut some washers.

To this day, I've never been able to touch down ANY part of the GT.



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post #10 of 11 Old Jul 18th, 2008, 3:29 pm
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

Quote:
Originally Posted by grifscoots
To this day, I've never been able to touch down ANY part of the GT.
I'm with you on that. There aren't that many corners on the street I feel comfortable going fast enough on to scrape a peg. I've scraped my boots a couple of times, and that's enough for me!
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post #11 of 11 Old Jul 20th, 2008, 6:21 am
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Re: A Twist of the Wrist II

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....Now, before those that should be quilting instead of riding motorcycles get their panties in a wad and accuse me of endangering their wives, children, grandchildren, cats, dogs and various fowl and livestock....
Well panties seem to wad very easily 'round here!

"Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." (Some really OLD friggin' White dude who couldn't have possibly known what he was talking about!) WARNING: Official HATE speech!
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