Procedure for pluging a tire - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
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post #1 of 11 Old Jun 18th, 2008, 12:30 pm Thread Starter
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Exclamation Procedure for pluging a tire

Anyone have the procedure for plugging a flat tire, I did a search but came up empty.

Never had to do it yet, however I know my luck will fun eventually.

Tom McNulty
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post #2 of 11 Old Jun 18th, 2008, 12:36 pm
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

Quote:
Originally Posted by car61
Anyone have the procedure for plugging a flat tire, I did a search but came up empty.

Never had to do it yet, however I know my luck will fun eventually.
Are you talking about an emergency roadside repair, or a plug intended to keep the tire running for the duration of the tread wear life of the tire?
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post #3 of 11 Old Jun 18th, 2008, 12:49 pm
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

http://www.stopngo.com/instructions.asp
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post #4 of 11 Old Jun 18th, 2008, 12:55 pm
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

If you bike came with eth OEM repair kit. there is an instruction booklet inside the green box
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post #5 of 11 Old Jun 18th, 2008, 1:00 pm
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaFlake
Before you jump on the Stop n' Go bandwagon, read....
http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/showthread.php?t=37261

My experience, and that of other's, is that the Stop n' Go system isn't as reliable as other systems.
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post #6 of 11 Old Jun 18th, 2008, 1:44 pm
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

Thanks for the heads-up!
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post #7 of 11 Old Jun 18th, 2008, 7:18 pm
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

A good "permanent" patch involves demounting the tire and placing a "mushroom" plug from the inside. Most folks, myself included won't do this with a motorcycle tire. We'd rather replace the tire because we feel safer.

An emergency roadside repair kit makes sense. There is one in the BMW tool kit, I have never used it. It might work well for all I know.

I have a Stop n' Go set. Neat tool, and the idea is to "inject" a mushroom type plug from the outside. Problem I and others have had is that the plug just isn't that durable. Seems like they made the plug so it would squeeze through the injector tool and that resulted in a trade off that decreased the reliability of the plug.

I find that using the siimple "gummy worm" or "sticky worm" with good tools is relatively easy and works well. I have ridden a car tire for hundreds of miles on a gummy worm plug. I have made it home on a bike tire plugged with a gummy worm and it kept working until I changed the tire.

The technique is simple as are the tools. The BMW tools in the bike tool kit are okay but not great. It is possible to get really inferior tools that will bend. This is an example of a cheap rasp which will probably bend, I had one like this and it bent during use:
http://toolmonger.com/2008/05/27/che...re-repair-kit/

A reasonably heavy duty set of plugging tools will have a "T" handle, not a screwdriver type of handle. Like this:
http://www.amazon.com/Plews-Tire-Rep...833328&sr=1-24

These kits come with instructions, but basically you ream the hole with the rasp, then push the gummy worm into the hole with the other tool. Push the worm/plug in leaving part of the worm showing outside the tire. Then rotate and extract the placement tool leaving the worm in place. Trim off the excess with knife and off you go.

http://www.4x4abc.com/jeep101/plugnplug.html

I still have my Stop 'n Go kit, but it is kind of heavy and I will leave it home when space and weight are a factor. The simple T-handle kits are cheap, are just as easy to use, and in my experience provide a more reliable plug.

Last edited by CharlieVT; Jun 18th, 2008 at 7:34 pm.
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post #8 of 11 Old Jun 18th, 2008, 7:43 pm
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

If you go with the Stop N Go kit, as Dave said earlier make sure to put a drop of oil to the plug. This makes your life soooo much easier.

No matter what kit you have, PRACTICE IT. Of course, not on a good tire . Next time you swap tires, keep an old one for practicing. And an extra tube of rubber cement is golden (they start drying up after the first use).

Cheers,

Adam
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post #9 of 11 Old Jun 19th, 2008, 9:08 am
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

Last flat I had ( rear Avon Storm ) I found while bike was in garage. Front tire was toast, so switched back to Metzlers. I attempted to use the OEM repair kit, as practice, on the old tire. The rubber plug thingies were hard dry and crumbly, and the little tube of glue was dry/non-sticky. I guess after 7 years, even the sealed containers can't preserve their contents. I had been contemplating the Stop-n-Go mushroom type kit, but hearing of Dave's problem, I'll pick up a gooey worm kit instead.

Any idea what the shelf-life of those worms are, before they dry up? My experience with OEM repair kit says "less than 7 years"

...Bob
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post #10 of 11 Old Jun 19th, 2008, 9:54 am
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

I've had problems similar to what Dave described with the Stop-N-Go plug kit. I have used it twice, neither time on my own bike. The problem that I had both times was that the repair would not hold an inflation pressure of more that about 28 psi. That's good enough to probably get you home or to a dealer but I certainly wouldn't rely on it to for more than that. I mentioned this problem to a distributor at a rally and he said that they changed the plug formulation to fix that problem and he gave me a bag of new plugs. However, I do not believe that the Plug N Go will ever provide anything resembling a permanent repair.

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post #11 of 11 Old Jun 19th, 2008, 6:32 pm
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Re: Procedure for pluging a tire

Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky_k1200lt
Last flat I had ( rear Avon Storm ) I found while bike was in garage. Front tire was toast, so switched back to Metzlers. I attempted to use the OEM repair kit, as practice, on the old tire. The rubber plug thingies were hard dry and crumbly, and the little tube of glue was dry/non-sticky. I guess after 7 years, even the sealed containers can't preserve their contents. I had been contemplating the Stop-n-Go mushroom type kit, but hearing of Dave's problem, I'll pick up a gooey worm kit instead.

Any idea what the shelf-life of those worms are, before they dry up? My experience with OEM repair kit says "less than 7 years"
I have some gooey worms that are probably a decade or more old. Probably got them at some autoparts store. They are still sticky and pliable. I used one of them a couple of years ago and it worked fine. I have no idea what the manufacturer is/was.
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