Not looking right in front of you - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
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post #1 of 8 Old Mar 16th, 2007, 12:44 pm Thread Starter
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Not looking right in front of you

Hi all,

My first post after I got my new (for me) 2003 K1200 LTC. what a thrill to ride this awesome bike.

Now my question: I read and was taught everywhere that when cornering (in particular ) one should look ahead into the curve as far as possible. I try to do this and it does make for a smooth nice corner but, I always feel the need to quickly glance right in front of my bike just to make sure there isn'r something on the road ( gravel, sand, cracks, debris) that could get me in trouble.

How do you all deal with this issue? It seems not right that you shoudl only use peripheral vision for something as important as nasty stuff on the road.

Thanks for your insights,

John
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post #2 of 8 Old Mar 16th, 2007, 1:47 pm
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Ditto what Dave said. The problem is that if you look at it you will hit it on a bike. I usually do a quick scan of the curve surface ahead then pick my exit point and, chin up, look there. Works very well. Same advice goes for the straight road and an object in the road. Spot it then look at the escape path not the object. Enjoy the LT.

John
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post #3 of 8 Old Mar 16th, 2007, 2:38 pm
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Welcome John

Yes I agree with all the posts about cornering. I bought a used 03 LT last April and I really enjoy the bike. Tad heavy but you get used to it quickly. Be careful stopping. you want to maintain a straight line and do not be tempted to turn your forks at all or down you go. Keep the chin up too. I learned a lot from the wisdom at this site. Enjoy your LT!
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post #4 of 8 Old Mar 16th, 2007, 3:09 pm
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Peripheral vision is really a great thang to practice, especially here in the heart of horned rat incorporated.



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post #5 of 8 Old Mar 16th, 2007, 7:00 pm
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John:The first for looking. Keith Code's book A Twist of The Wrist II chapter 21 use is what he calls Wide Screen Vision. This is where you look straight a head and let your mind see the whole picture with out moving your eyes. As far as looking in a curve, I find it hard to look where the exit for the curve is for its going too far down the road for me. Going into the curve I decide how much lean I should have and I look at that distance down the road, and that spot moves down the road till the curve is done. As you go along you can make small corrections to your lean. Doing it this way I find that I can react much faster to any change in the road.

DON
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post #6 of 8 Old Mar 16th, 2007, 9:26 pm
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You might find it useful to practice stopping with ABS.

My feeling is that if I can't notice sand or gravel while looking ahead through a corner, I'm going too fast.

When I encounter sand a gravel, I'm usually going slow enough to have the bike upright, and don't have to worry about small stones--the LT is pretty big and heavy.

Anything that is big enough to have to avoid should be large enough to easily see, and easily see where you will be, or want to be, when you ride past it.

So far, hidden pit falls have been having to stop in a dip in the road, with both tires straddling the dip, and having to stop on sloping tarmac in shadows where I don't immediately notice the slope.

Bob
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post #7 of 8 Old Mar 19th, 2007, 8:32 am Thread Starter
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Thanks all for the advice.

I took the MSF beginner course last year and I am signing up for the 'experienced' one as soon as there is a slot available. I guess practice is what's needed here. I am also reading the Hough book on proficient motorcycling: it makes a lot of the points you are all making.

Chin up!

John
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post #8 of 8 Old Mar 19th, 2007, 8:53 am
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Eyes up and OUT... I "scan" the road along my intended path of travel ... USUALLY..

1- from a "big picture" view,
2- pick an "entry" and "exit" point
3- adjust "entry" speed and "position"
4- NOW, IF SAFE... trace the line with your eyes.. should take less than 1/10th of a second from the "entry" point, through the curve to the "exit".
5- keep eyes "OUT THERE".....

The "trick" is to "feel" where your tires are contacting the roadway and how that "translates" to your "situational awareness"....

Riding is much like flying in that you MUST "stay ahead of the machine"... you must be riding for the "now" THROUGH the next 30 seconds or more....

With practice, this will become second nature...

The "exceptions" are "blind curves", blind cagers, or restricted line-of-sight. Those you can only ride as far as you can "plan"...

...............
J.M.J...
Dcn Channing

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