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post #1 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 3:05 pm Thread Starter
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Long Distance Ride need advice

Going from Albany (Upstate NY) to West Palm Beach in mid April. My brother and I are making this trip on Bikes. Never went this distance before by land.

Trip is roughly 1400 +/-. We would try to avoid Major Highways. He has a old Gold Wing and does not like to go over 65 miles an hour.

I was thinking that 500 miles a day is realistic. I figure that is 7 hour of riding time. Is this what you would estimate?

Do you think this is realistic?

Also it was suggested in my research here to create some waypoints in GPS and breakup or divide the trip into sections. I figure 3 destinations (waypoints) will do the trick. Do you agree?

Any Street Pilot III settings I should consider for this Trip?

I am in the planning stages now. I have to time trip up to make sure I make meeting at PGA National. I do not want to underestimate trip.

I look forward to any help you long distance riders can offer.

Is it hard on body?
Stretching or resting advice?

Thanks

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post #2 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 3:11 pm Thread Starter
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Long Distance Ride need advice

Going from Albany (Upstate NY) to West Palm Beach in mid April. My brother and I are making this trip on Bikes. Never went this distance before by land.

Trip is roughly 1400 +/-. We would try to avoid Major Highways. He has a old Gold Wing and does not like to go over 65 miles an hour.

I was thinking that 500 miles a day is realistic. I figure that is 9 hour of riding time. Is this what you would estimate?

Do you think this is realistic?

Also it was suggested in my research here to create some waypoints in GPS and breakup or divide the trip into sections. I figure 3 destinations (waypoints) will do the trick. Do you agree?

Any Street Pilot III settings I should consider for this Trip?

I am in the planning stages now. I have to time trip up to make sure I make meeting at PGA National. I do not want to underestimate trip.

I look forward to any help you long distance riders can offer.

Is it hard on body?
Stretching or resting advice?

Thanks

Hulkster 2002 BMW K1200LTE "Hulkster Green"

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post #3 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 3:22 pm
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Unless my math is wrong, you would have to average 71 mph to cover 500 miles in 7 hours. I went 400 miles on county roads through Pennsylvania several times and it took me about 9 hours. Much nicer ride, but slow. IMHO no matter how comfortable the bike, you will get sore and need to take breaks every couple of hours (unless you are the Iron Butt type). Also, unless your planning is perfect, at some point, you will have to get on a highway to cross a bridge, connect between two highways, etc. Consider taking the highway once you are south of Raleigh. 95 is not that busy down there and is a very nice ride.

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post #4 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 4:05 pm
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500 miles a day

As Brian said 500 miles is easily 7 hours, add fuel stops, coffee stops, lunch stops and lets just stop and stretch/look at the view. If you need to put miles under you what is wrong with the major highways? though I am sure the next clasification of roads down from that are still good and head in the right direction. For the first day I would set a 500 or 600 mile target using major roads just to get a good chunk of miles done - and you know all the good bits near home. That leaves 800/900 miles over how many days?

It can be fun but you do need a bit of discipline at stops not to waste time - it adds up pretty quick at a mile a minute.

I suppose it is about balance between enjoying yourselves and meeting the days target.

Good luck and enjoy.

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post #5 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 4:10 pm
 
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From the Village Idiot...

In late April, I will be heading out on a 9 to 10K-mile trip across the country and back. I don't mention it to brag, but as a way to encourage you that this ride you're planning is very doable and it's a good start into entering the world of LD Touring.

First piece of advise - Communication! Make sure you and your friend are 'on the same page' with everything. Any details undiscussed will come back to haunt you halfway to FL. I guarantee it. Been there, done that.

Second - Hit the road EARLY each day! Between 6-7am, if possible. I usually grab a cup of coffee and a couple pieces of fruit and GO! You can always stop for a 30-minute breakfast around 9:30. Then, you ride until about 1:30 and grab lunch. You hit the road at 2:30 and ride until evening. With this schedule, you'll be amazed at how many miles you can make melt away by early evening...and feel good about doing it. Works for me anyway.

Third - GPS Coordinates and alternate routes. Not only should you break up the ride into separate days with routes for each day. But also have alternate routes for each day. And each route should have many waypoints. One waypoint that I include in every ride is state lines. I always like knowing how far I am from the next border. And always make sure you zoom in far enough to create waypoints on the correct side of the road. Often, I see new GPS users create a waypoint on the northbound lane when they are traveling SOUTH. Then they wonder why the GPS is wanting them to do a U-Turn.

I have lots more to that I could say...but I think that's about enough for now. One more piece of "advise". If you're not having fun...STOP! Figure out what's not fun about it and change what you're doing.
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post #6 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 4:19 pm
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on two lanes, 350 per day is more likely unless you never want to stop............
Karen and I did a 9,000 mile ride last summer and as a result, all future trips will be based on 250-300 per day max..
(But then, we like to smell the roses)

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post #7 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 4:19 pm
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If you're making this trip in mid April can I assume you have gerbings or similar heated apparel? I travel through Albany to Lake George that time of month and it is usually pretty cool riding, if not snowing. I'd beet feet down to the Baltimore/Washington area then start taking the scenic roads. When I take long rides such as that I make frequent short stops. 120-140 miles 2.5 hrs, stop 10-12 minutes, after next 120-140 miles stop for gas and repeat. My stops are usually not longer than 15 minutes, and I usually average 52 mph for the day. You mentioned the GW, are you on an LT? The poorer gas mileage of the GW will alter your stop intervals.

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post #8 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 4:56 pm
 
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500 miles per day is pretty easily done, but if your riding partner isn't going over 65 mph I think that you are probably looking at closer to 10 hours (stopping for gas etc. burns up a lot of time). PS - don't forget to stop and smell the flowers - some of my most memorable trips have involved stops I never planned to make.
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post #9 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 5:03 pm
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I had similar results on my 8900 mile CCR trip (Seattle-Atlanta) last summer. Unless you are blasting down the freeway a 500 mile day is 10-12 hours. On my trip I spent less than 1/4 of my mileage on freeways. All the slow downs running through towns really puts a hit on your average speed. If you do any kind of sightseeing or photography then you are likely riding in the dark to get that 500 miles in. Not that riding in the dark is necessarily an issue but time has a way of slipping away especially when the ride is not the only thing you want to experience.


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post #10 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 5:09 pm Thread Starter
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Thanks, I tried to correct to 9 hours of riding a day but pushed enter key to quickly. This is the advice I am looking for. You all have some great points. I have the proper gear. No heated clothing except for Vest. Dame cord keeps disconnecting during ride. I will have to come with a FIX.

Please keep the advice coming this will be useful.

Thanks

Hulkster 2002 BMW K1200LTE "Hulkster Green"

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post #11 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 5:23 pm
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If you avoid major highways, the trip will take almost twice as long. You'll have many traffic lights, town centers, and the route will probably not always be straight-line direct in the direction you want to go.

Stopping, eating etc are all personal choices and vary greatly between riders. A lot depends on your age, health, and concentration limits. I'm always concerned that I'm going to get tired and lose my concentration and go thru a red light or something, so I stop for 30 mins for meals, and walk around for 10 minutes at fuel stops. You should get off and stretch regularly to avoid cramps, blood clots, etc. Also, keep drinking to stay hydrated. I have nothing to prove to anyone, so if I want to do a 500 mile day, I do it. Another time I might only want to do 300, so that is what I'll do. After all is said and done the ride has to be enjoyable to me, not like work. I also have some arthritis, and am prone to some leg cramps, so I stop and walk and stretch. YMMV.

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post #12 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 6:08 pm
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If it were Me

I've said this before, it's about the ride, not the destination.
Joe already mentioned get up early,

I like to say a hundred miles before breakfast, some days more some less
that depends on how much I'm enjoying the ride.

Stop often, sure it takes time
but if you're not enjoying yourself then why are you even doing it?

Don't make reservations, take it as it comes,
some days you'll go further than you planned other times less.

It's not very much fun when you're cold, wet, tired and sore
driving past all of these warm and comfortable motels
because you've made reservations another 50 miles up the road.

Use the interstates to get around cities, then get back on the backroads,
or if you're going to drive at night, you're probably better of on the interstate,
it will be safer (wildlife) and you can't see anything after dark anyway.

Be flexible, with approximate route you've got planned going a little bit out of the way will put you on skyline drive
http://www.nps.gov/shen/planyourvisi...line-drive.htm
and the Blue Ridge Parkway
http://www.blueridgeparkway.org/

that is probably the finest motorcycling road in the Eastern US.

And last 250-400 miles is a lot more realistic if you're going to travel backroads


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post #13 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 6:19 pm
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by messenger13
In late April, I will be heading out on a 9 to 10K-mile trip across the country and back. I don't mention it to brag, but as a way to encourage you that this ride you're planning is very doable and it's a good start into entering the world of LD Touring.

First piece of advise - Communication! Make sure you and your friend are 'on the same page' with everything. Any details undiscussed will come back to haunt you halfway to FL. I guarantee it. Been there, done that.

Second - Hit the road EARLY each day! Between 6-7am, if possible. I usually grab a cup of coffee and a couple pieces of fruit and GO! You can always stop for a 30-minute breakfast around 9:30. Then, you ride until about 1:30 and grab lunch. You hit the road at 2:30 and ride until evening. With this schedule, you'll be amazed at how many miles you can make melt away by early evening...and feel good about doing it. Works for me anyway.

Third - GPS Coordinates and alternate routes. Not only should you break up the ride into separate days with routes for each day. But also have alternate routes for each day. And each route should have many waypoints. One waypoint that I include in every ride is state lines. I always like knowing how far I am from the next border. And always make sure you zoom in far enough to create waypoints on the correct side of the road. Often, I see new GPS users create a waypoint on the northbound lane when they are traveling SOUTH. Then they wonder why the GPS is wanting them to do a U-Turn.

I have lots more to that I could say...but I think that's about enough for now. One more piece of "advise". If you're not having fun...STOP! Figure out what's not fun about it and change what you're doing.
Joe.... yer gonna miss that x-cellent LT boom box!!!
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post #14 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 6:37 pm
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My 2 cents.

There may be other software (with GPS) etc that does this, but it sounds like you may not have any. With amazing bang for the buck for about $35 from costco pick up Microsoft Streets and Trips. Easy to operate. It will show you everything about your trip, and in the end will tell you, based on your planned speed, route, fuel tank size and mileage, how many breaks you take, how long lunch is etc, where you will end up each day and how long your trip will take. The variation are up to you and limitless. This is a nickle tour of what you can do and get:

- enter start and end times based on your desire
- enter your preferred relative speed on all types of roads
- enter 'your' route on any street (type in road or "pick" off map)
- or it will generate a route for you based on your preferences,
- it calculates turn by turn directions,
- enter any break times,
- enter your fuel economy and tank size and it will tell you where you will need to fill up,

It also has listed, planned and actual construction projects that you will encounter.

This tool has been outstanding for me, letting me know how long these "cool" routes will take over others and how many miles I can cover in the hours I plan to ride. Some routes that look to be about the same, are way different in ride times. It has saved me many times from being out in the middle of no-where after hours and lets me look at where fuel, restaurants, and accomodations are and ARN'T. And then tells me their phone number.

Good luck and have a great trip!
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post #15 of 33 Old Jan 13th, 2007, 9:31 pm
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500/day

My k1200LT and I average 256 mi/day, over several major trips. An occasional 400 mi is too long. We travel 'tourist speed'. Steve

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post #16 of 33 Old Jan 14th, 2007, 1:03 am
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Since you haven't actually done day after day riding, I'd suggest a MUCH less aggressive schedule.

Plan on about 65% of the speed limit for speed. This will include quick stops for fuel, but NOT for butt breaks or eating. I think you'll find 350 mile days challenging enough, and if you for sure just HAVE to be there on time, I'd add an extra day, for just in case (bike trouble, weather, or just plain tired), making that a five day trip. I think you'll have to spend a LOT more than nine hours a day in the saddle to make that a three day trip, using secondary roads.

Personally, I think you're asking for trouble with a self imposed speed limit of 65 MPH. It's much safer to flow with the traffic, and many secondary roads down here have much faster traffic than that (65 MPH limit, with traffic running five to ten over that).

I'd strongly recommend a couple of "day" runs between now and then, where you put in a full day just like you intend to ride. You can make a loop out of it, so that when you tire, you can quickly get back home. That will tell you where the comfort level is for both of you. When riding together, your fuel range and your "butt" range is only that which is the lesser of the two.

Those high mileage days that you hear and read about are a different animal altogether. To do that, you take the shortest breaks possible, and keep the wheels turning. All but the most hardcore find that they can't sustain as many miles several days in a row as they can the first day. Also, the more you ride, the easier it gets, so get plenty of shakedown cruises prior to the long trip.

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post #17 of 33 Old Jan 14th, 2007, 2:09 am
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Long distance ride advice

Start Early. Use the highways to bypass major cities, then return to the smaller roads. Cities cost time. Don't commit yourself to a particular destination for the intermediate stopovers. From memory finding motels etrc is extremely easy in the US. If you are having a good day you can continue down the road a bit.
If you intend riding at 65mph key in an average of about 45mph in the GPS or other program. Set your preferences for road types etc.

You never average the speed you're riding at.
Try to time your arrival at large towns and cities to avoid busiest periods. Work out your fuel stops. Don't get caught out in the middle of nowhere where gas stations close at 6pm. The Goldwing will have to stop long before you anyway, so plan the stops to suit his gas mileage.


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post #18 of 33 Old Jan 14th, 2007, 5:32 am
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You haven't mentioned how much time you have for the trip. I suggest that if the meeting at the end is *important* you allow at least 4 days to get there. For any ride other than interstate highways I always estimate 400 mile days & a 50 mph average. Even that can be difficult on scenic routes, in construction zones, or in small towns. 500 mile days are 10 to 12 hour days if things go well.

While I really like my GPS I wouldn't set any waypoints or make any reservations. Take along a road atlas. It's handy if you want to change your route along the way.

Hydrate! Drink water at *every* stop! If you concentrate on taking water in, it will find it's way out & help add stretch breaks in the process.

Consider Skyline Drive & the Blue Ridge Parkway from Virginia on down. Both are scenic & allow access to federal & state highways that provide variety & food & lodging. They also take you inland. The coast in the Carolina's & Georgia, while interesting, will drop your progress to nil unless you get on I=95.

Both bikes should be more than comfortable enough, & 65 is a speed comfortable enough for both back roads & the interstate. It'll get some miles under you on the interstate highways, but will be difficult to maintain on the back roads. Give yourselves as much time as possible & enjoy your trip.
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post #19 of 33 Old Jan 14th, 2007, 6:29 am
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Smile Enjoy the trip no matter what!

The objective is not to see how far you can go in a day but to enjoy the trip getting there. Is it the trip or the destination you seek? I have always found that more is time better then more miles unless you are in Nebraska or West Texas (no offense meant to our NE or TX friends) on the bike. 500 miles a day at 60 miles per hours means you have 8.34 hours of riding with no stops. This means that gas, meals, and a little refreshment will take another 2.5 hours out of your day without seeing anything but the motel. If your friend does not want to go over 65 mph and you take secondary roads it will be much longer for traffic and stop lights along the way and roads with less than 65 mph. Not to mention the additional cages you must compete with in the towns. You easily can do the trip in 3 days but long 12-13 hour days but only on the interstates with little time to enjoy the sights, hydrate, rest, eat, and recover. I would figure on 4 days on the secondary roads but I am not in that much of a hurry.

A CB or a communication system between riders will help make the ride easier for stops, pee calls, and just to break up the trip.

Enjoy and have a safe trip.

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post #20 of 33 Old Jan 14th, 2007, 8:20 am
 
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Wink traveling theory

Over the years I've found that there are 3 types of riders. (1) riders that want to get to the destination as quick as possible. (2) riders that want to travel a certain number of miles each day. and (3) riders who just want to ride and enjoy the trip. The goal is to do all three! If your buddy only drives 65mph then you should realistically plan on averaging about 50mph or less. Decide ,based on your past experience, how many hours a day you want to ride. Be flexible! Don't lock yourself in to such a ridged schedule that you can't enjoy the trip! Also, expect some bad weather and have a plan if you need to stop early one day. It's better to stop more for short periods of time than to wear yourself out trying to do a marathon. I like to stop about every 100 miles just to stretch, pee, and rehydrate. A short stop will refresh you. If you get too focused on the destination you lose part of the joy of riding. Stop and smell the Roses. Every ride I take is an adventure! Even riding to work. Ride safe and God Speed! Ron Ray
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post #21 of 33 Old Jan 14th, 2007, 8:33 am
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What is the overall purpose of the trip, the destination or the trip. I think you plan of 500 miles per day is VERY easy on interstates, however depending on what type of side road you are taking and how much site seeing you are doing, 300 might be more realistic. I usually plan on 700 mile days using interstates with very little stopping. I usually end up doing 700 to 1000 miles per day and the day is long usually 12 hours or more. As mentioned earlier, start early each day.


If it is the trip. The Blue ridge parkway is a must. It is about 450 miles of 45 mph road atop mountains going south. The views are incredible. Plan on taking 2 days to stop and see the views. I would personally skip Skyline drive. Much slower, Toll Road and more traffic due to being closer to Washington DC. Avoid riding either of these roads after dark. Too many animals to worry about. Typical sitings are wild turkeys, deer, beer, bobcat, fox etc.

Route 81 parallels both of these roads, so it is usually easy to jump off and use some interstate if needed.

At the end of the Blueridge parkway you are in the smoky mountains. If the trip is the purpose, spend one day exploring this area.

On the East Coast, the Blue Ridge Parkway (southern half) and the smoky mountain area are the Best Motorcycle roads around. You will need to go far to find a ride that has as many great roads!

This will but you into northern Georgia.
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post #22 of 33 Old Jan 19th, 2007, 6:25 am
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulkster
Trip is roughly 1400 +/-. We would try to avoid Major Highways. He has a old Gold Wing and does not like to go over 65 miles an hour. I was thinking that 500 miles a day is realistic. I figure that is 7 hour of riding time. Do you think this is realistic?
With the above scenario, you'd be doing well to average 50mph. That makes it a 10 hour ride. If you've never done rides of 400 miles per day before, it may be a little tiring to line up 3 consecutive 10 hour days. Especially if the riding is not on major highways. Just something to consider in your planning.

Quote:
Is it hard on body? Stretching or resting advice?
It will make a real difference in how you feel at the end of the day if you stretch a little at each gas stop. A couple of deep knee bends, shaking out the arms, that kind o f thing. Just to get your blood circulation going a little.
It only takes a minute or so but is time well spent.


hth,

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post #23 of 33 Old Jan 19th, 2007, 7:20 am
 
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500 mile days will work if you go the freeway route. If you are going secondary roads you will find 300-400 more realistic. Leave early, take advantage of gas stops to stretch, walk around , don't forget to drink plenty of water. I keep a water bottle in my cup holder and it usually needs to be refilled at every gas stop. Have fun
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post #24 of 33 Old Jan 19th, 2007, 9:21 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickcavanaugh
If it is the trip. The Blue ridge parkway is a must. It is about 450 miles of 45 mph road atop mountains going south. The views are incredible. Plan on taking 2 days to stop and see the views. I would personally skip Skyline drive. Much slower, Toll Road and more traffic due to being closer to Washington DC. Avoid riding either of these roads after dark.
I understand what Rick is trying to communicate here, but cannot agree with all of it,
it's true that there is more traffic on Skyline drive, especially on the weekends,
but keep in mind this is practically in his backyard, my assumption is he's probably done it so many times that it's not as much fun for him as it would be for somebody that has never seen it before.

You also mentioned that you're having a problem with your heated vest becoming unplugged,
I had a similar issue with my BMW vest plugged in by my left foot
until I fastened the cord to my tankbag with only a short loop hanging out toward my vest
where I plugged/unplugged it, that "cured" it for me.


Hans
St. Petersburg FL

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post #25 of 33 Old Jan 19th, 2007, 9:33 am
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The single best piece of advice I can offer is to stay hydrated. The second best is GOLD BOND POWDER! I know it sounds corny, but it really works. Even during the Saddlesore 1000's and Bunburner 1500's I've done I always found time to "powder up" during stops, and it really makes a difference. Being uncomfortable in that area down there can make even a 200 mile day difficult. Just stay away from the medicated (blue bottle) powder, don't ask me how I know. Good luck on your trip, it sounds like a great time.

Fred Jewell
No longer president, River City Beemers
2009 R1200RT - Silver


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post #26 of 33 Old Jan 19th, 2007, 11:10 am
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Not much new to add to all of the above, especially since I've taken just a few long-ish trips, but I will second the idea that bike-to-bike communications is a requirement, IMO. About the tenth time he signals you to pull over to tell you something inane, you'll want to kill him. The 20th time, you will.

I feel your pain; I have a riding buddy who has a new Gold Wing and he just doesn't like to get on the interstate or other faster-mph roads. A trip to KY last year (takes 5 hours by car) took us 8 hours. Frank discussions between you and your friend, pre-trip, will set expectations so there are no hard feelings.

Howard Schisler
2015 BMW K1600GTL
2009 BMW K1200LT - 60k miles
2012 BMW F650GS (sold)
2005 BMW K1200LT - "Gray Ghost", traded at 120k miles
2005 Honda Shadow 650 (sold)
AMA, IBA, BMW MOA. CCRs: Braselton 2006, Osage Beach 2007, Duluth 2012


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post #27 of 33 Old Jan 19th, 2007, 1:01 pm
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Listen to your body

Unless you have a specific place to be at a specific time, stop when you feel like it and don't push it. Some days it seems like you can simply ride forever, the weather is cool and you just seem to be flying. Other times 200 miles is a killer because of bad weather or conditions. I lreally ike the idea of multiple way points and not having a reservation up ahead. A reservation will force you to ride when you really shouldn't.

Dano
Tampa, Fl.

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post #28 of 33 Old Jan 19th, 2007, 1:06 pm
 
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Indeed. When my wife and I travel on the bike, we never make reservations. We only had one time when a lack of rooms forced us down the road another 60 miles
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post #29 of 33 Old Oct 10th, 2007, 1:01 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dandiver
Unless you have a specific place to be at a specific time, stop when you feel like it and don't push it. Some days it seems like you can simply ride forever, the weather is cool and you just seem to be flying. Other times 200 miles is a killer because of bad weather or conditions. I lreally ike the idea of multiple way points and not having a reservation up ahead. A reservation will force you to ride when you really shouldn't.
I think that sums it up nicely. Ride each day as it comes, stop when you see something interesting, be it a nice little town with a quant eartery, an old building or farmhouse woth snapping a picture of, a bridge across a deep valley, a battlefield (there is tons of history along the eastern part of the nation) a freindly Inn that looks inviting, etc. Whatever time you lose on a day exploring can be made up the next on slab if you need to get to your destination on a given date. At this time of year reservations really aren't needed, in all my trips that I've taken, esp in late fall or early spring I have never had a problem finding a room when wondering the back roads.

As for the blueridge/smoky Mt's consider doing it on your way back, for some reason it is always less crowded going north, I know, having riden them off and on for the past 30 years. Again at this time of year i never make reservations, unless you stay ON the parkway (the few places right on the parkway and Skyline do fill up on weekends this time of year) but again during the week there is almost no traffic to speak of, esp. north bound.

take your time and enjoy the ride. after you've done a few you may find that the long haul high mileage type of rides are you thing ( I know many folks that really enjoy putting on the miles) for others its a mix, or for folks like me, its all about the back roads and small towns and taking lots of breaks to explore and photograph.

so my adivse is, go easy the first time, don't over plan your route or the trip, you never know what may turn up along the way or some interesting road that says "go this way!". Then work up to longer rides and more miles a day till you find your own nitch.

RM

I ride because I look funny walking!
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post #30 of 33 Old Oct 10th, 2007, 6:03 pm
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This coming sunday, I ride from phoenix to minneapolis for the work week, have to be at work tues morn.

That means I have to do 1700 miles from sun morn til mon nite (so I can get some rest for the mtg).

That means, I have to do about 1100 miles on sunday to be on the 'safe' side (making it to work in time).

I only have the heated gerbing jkt, you'll need it this time of year if your doing a long day. Being cold takes hours off the ride physically (at least at my age, heheh).

Don't overpack if you can help it. That thing is heavy but when you get tired, it absorbs water or something and gains 3x the weight!

Also...gas up in the morning if your really tired. I gassed up one nite when tired, lost the bike somehow, broke my ceebaily while getting squished between the pump and the bike until someone came over to help. I can usually lift a car for comparo (well, you know) but I'll be daymed if I could move that monster more than a half-inch until I got help.

THAT was a $300 gas stop, I won't make that mistake again.
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post #31 of 33 Old Oct 10th, 2007, 6:41 pm
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And if you're really tired you fill up the night before, decide you're too tired to continue safely, find a motel to catch some sleep, then fill up again in the morning. I was wondering why the bike only took 0.2 gallons, until I remembered that I'd already filled it. Better than forgetting to fill up then running out, I suppose.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
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Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #32 of 33 Old Oct 10th, 2007, 8:43 pm
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If you have never done a long day either in hours or miles go out and do one or a few before you take your trip. Make sure you also know how to address common problems like flats. Make sure the bikes are road worthy; check for loose nuts/bolts, tuned, good tires, and oil. Since this is you and your brothers first long trip take lots of pictures. Like what has been said before get out early before traffic starts. Get some miles under your belt then stop and have breakfast. Don't eat heavy meals, stay hydrated. Use the highways to get around big towns. Give yourself an extra day for whatever. Have fun!

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post #33 of 33 Old Oct 11th, 2007, 12:47 am
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Riding with a partner takes some work on both parts. It will be give and take on both parties. When alone I can ride and ride, for CCR I left home at 0330 and arrived at CCR at 1530 that afternoon about 800 miles, half interstate, half secondary roads. I stopped once for breakfast about 1000 am in Jonesboro, Ar. About halfway point.

Learning to ride with a partner takes time to develop habits and understanding. Developing signals, in case com unit goes down, if you will want to continue with your trip, also to continue riding with your partner. You can have discussions about all of it, but until you do it, I garantee, one of you will be angry before the day is out. In fact Miss E and I have different ideas and she will get upset with me from time to time. I have ridden with a number of people and there are some I will NEVER ride with again. Our styles are so different that we both end up angry and then the purpose of the trip is blown.

It is like developing a fishing partner, only in a boat both of you are stuck!

Also if this is just one trip you may have to just concede to your partner, if you have to be at the destination at a particular date, you may want to add a day or two, That way you wont be pressed to make miles, when you dont need to, you can put up with a lot that way.

Hope this helps, my .02 cents

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