brake bleeding advice requested - BMW Luxury Touring Community
 
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post #1 of 5 Old Nov 9th, 2006, 9:42 am
Bandit
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brake bleeding advice requested

not on my LT ... i know better than to tackle that little engineering challenge.

it's for a 1995 triumph sprint with non-boosted, non-ABS brakes. my son has "appropriated" the bike and is away at college. and the brakes are overdue for service, including replacing fluid. so he'll be bringing by the garage this weekend for a pit stop.

i know there are two principal ways to bleed ... with a vacuum device or with the so-called "speed bleeder" one-way valve that threads into the caliper.

so the question is ... which one is better? and i'd welcome any other tips on properly doing the job.

TIA ...
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post #2 of 5 Old Nov 9th, 2006, 11:43 am
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Lightbulb 3rd method

These 2 methods allow you to do the job by yourself, without an assistant.
Speed bleeders are great and inexpensive. I have no experience with a vacuum device so I can't comment on that.
There is of course the 3rd method, the one most of us used for years. Nothing is required, except for an assistant to hit the brake handle or pedal when you say so and release when you say so as you open and close the bleeding screw....

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post #3 of 5 Old Nov 9th, 2006, 12:51 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandit
not on my LT ... i know better than to tackle that little engineering challenge.

it's for a 1995 triumph sprint with non-boosted, non-ABS brakes. my son has "appropriated" the bike and is away at college. and the brakes are overdue for service, including replacing fluid. so he'll be bringing by the garage this weekend for a pit stop.

i know there are two principal ways to bleed ... with a vacuum device or with the so-called "speed bleeder" one-way valve that threads into the caliper.

so the question is ... which one is better? and i'd welcome any other tips on properly doing the job.

TIA ...
Whichever method you use, *DON'T* bleed by stroking the brake lever all the way back to the grip (or to the end of the rear pedal stroke) if the fluid is very old and the brakes have been mostly unused. The end of the master cyclinder typically never sees the master cylinder piston seal go by to help keep the cylinder wall clean. If water settles in this area, the cylinder walls can develop rust. After the rust has developed, it will *shred* the piston seal if the seal is forced into the area, as during bleeding.

I learned this lesson years ago on an R75/6 (undertank front brake reservoir, directly over the engine block). Shortly after purchasing it, I changed the front fluid, and a few hours later found most of the fluid on the ground after it bled past the piston -- which, Murphy ensured, was angled down to guarantee maximum undesired flow out of the master cylinder! (Worse yet, it drained directly on to the engine; fortunately the early airhead motors were not painted, so no engine damage -- I was *real* lucky on that one).

Now you know why I prefer pressure or vacuum bleeding over manual lever/pedal application.

Mark Neblett
Fairfax, VA
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post #4 of 5 Old Nov 9th, 2006, 1:11 pm
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mark and gilles ... thanks very much.

the reason i ask is that the last time i did this job (on a GS500) i think there was residual air in the line. which of course is no damn good. i used a syringe with a small tube. i think this time i will invest in a good vacuum bleeder.
post #5 of 5 Old Nov 9th, 2006, 6:05 pm
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If you can get one use a pressure bleeder.

It is basically a pump up insect sprayer like device that will attach to the reservoir and pushes the fluid through. 0% chance of air in the line. Very fast, very effective.

A vacuum bleeder can pull air in. Not much of a chance but it is there.
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